2010 Trailblazer electrical issues - Polaris ATV Forum
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-14-2018, 01:03 PM Thread Starter
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2010 Trailblazer electrical issues

Hello All! I have a 2010 Trailblazer 330 that seems to have some weird electrical issues. I have just put in a new battery and voltage regulator about three weeks ago. We used the quad once and then it sat for two weeks. When I went out to start it, the battery was basically dead. I used the pull start and it fired up. I noticed that if I turned on the headlight or the brake light it would shut down. If I left those items off, it would run but it wouldn't rev up very high. I pulled the battery out to recharged it and for some reason the battery will go from 13.0 volts to 8.5 volts over night just sitting on a table. When I first recharged the battery I thought I should do a amp draw test on the system. When I hooked everything up like it I was supposed to, it was showing a 0.416 mA draw. I checked the fuses and nothing changed. I then disconnected the RPM limiter and the draw went down to 0.237 mA which is still a little high. I plugged the RPM limiter back in and then unplugged the voltage regulator and the draw went to 0.000. My question is, can a voltage regulator draw power from the battery? When the quad is running it's putting out 14.8 volts to the battery which should be fine. I really don't know where to go from here with this.

Any info would be very helpful.
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-15-2018, 08:33 AM
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If the battery loses voltage overnight setting on a table (not connected to anything) the battery is defective.

I suspect a defective rec/reg - not because of the key off draw, but the description of your problem. The ignition system is a DC CDI - it needs a good clean 9vdc or higher to fire the engine. Since the lights will kill it, it's kinda obvious to me that the voltage is falling below 9 volts. Although you are getting 14.8 volts across the battery, the battery is taking all the voltage and not leaving anything for the lights and such. It's also possible you are getting a regulated AC voltage across the battery and that's what killed it. Install a new battery and test the rec/reg (or just install a new rec/reg) and see if your problems go away.
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-15-2018, 09:21 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the advice latebird! I will pick up a new battery first as well as order a replacement Reg/rectifier. Would you recommend a stock Polaris regulator or Rmstator (mosfet) regulator? There isn't much difference in price but I have no experience with Rmstator products.

2017 Kawasaki Brute Force 750i (Beast!)
Stock for now but will have a big bore kit soon!

2010 Polaris Trailblazer 330 (Wife's Toy)
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-15-2018, 12:11 PM
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I typically use Rick's and Arrow rec/reg - I have no experience with RMStator but mosfet is short for metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor. The mosfet is the regulator and basically operates the same as any other rec/reg. What I can tell you is Polaris does not manufacture rectifier/regulators - they outsource them (probably from the Chinese) - therefore I believe any unit that fits and does not come from Polaris is at least as good as theirs.

As for the battery, get a good one - either spring for a Lithium (very light, extremely durable, typically comes with a 3 year warranty, but requires a special charger for maintaining) or a absorbed glass material (AGM) battery (more durable than a conventional flooded lead antimony battery) There is a good article on lead acid batteries here (if you are interested)

https://batteryuniversity.com/index....n_modern_times
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-10-2018, 01:55 PM
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Hey "latebird, found your post researching batts for my 2000 trailblazer 250..everything is fine except the batteries getting from local "Polaris dealer last bout 3-4 months then wont take a charge.. they are "Yausa?...$50..guaranteed a year but tired of them whining .. Can you steer me to a better batt (agm)? am willing to pay higher price since winter and snow is on way and reliability is essential up here. Thanks for your time!

Last edited by highpines; 10-10-2018 at 01:57 PM.
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-10-2018, 02:53 PM
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Electrical problem

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Originally Posted by highpines View Post
Hey "latebird, found your post researching batts for my 2000 trailblazer 250..everything is fine except the batteries getting from local "Polaris dealer last bout 3-4 months then wont take a charge.. they are "Yausa?...$50..guaranteed a year but tired of them whining .. Can you steer me to a better batt (agm)? am willing to pay higher price since winter and snow is on way and reliability is essential up here. Thanks for your time!
@highpines - if I was your dealer, I would insist on checking your charging system before giving you another battery - I suspect you are getting AC from the alternator to the battery and AC will kill a battery - if that's the case it would make no difference what battery you install, it will fail in 2 to 4 months depending on how much you use it - it wouldn't make any difference if it was a $35 Chinese battery or a $200 Lithium battery. Get the charging system checked and possibly repaired before wasting money on another battery

If this sounds unsympathetic, I'm sorry, but a charging system operating like it should would get a year to two years out of a cheap battery
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-10-2018, 04:17 PM
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No not unsympathetic at all..I work on all my vehicles and just did top end on this Trailblazer..new piston, gaskets etc...yea compression is king ..so I second guess myself to be sure. Just went out put v-meter on while running and I get 14.6 volts charging which is good for all vehicles right? Ummm what is AC" from alternator? ...I appreciate your knowledge and help..
If I'm charging well is this a good batt?....Thanx

https://www.amazon.com/CALTRIC-BATTE.../dp/B01DGLSTIY
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-11-2018, 08:34 AM
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Caltric sells fairly good Chinese products and I have used their products which are available for vintage vehicles that the manufacturer no longer supports, but I gather from your post that there is an underlying problem.

Switch your meter to AC volts and check across the battery - let me know what the reading is.

The alternator produces alternating positive and negative voltage pulses commonly referred to as AC (alternating current) - the rectifier inverts the pulses so they all go the same direction - this creates a pulsating DC (direct current) - the terms are technically incorrect because what is generated is voltage. Voltage is the push and current is flow. "Alternators" create voltage and the voltage is present as long as the magnetic field is rotated around the stator (stationary) winding - the voltage is responsible for current flow when connected to a conductor.

The most common AC Generator is a permanent magnet rotated around a stationary coil (single phase) or 3 coils (three phase). A 3 phase alternator is most commonly constructed with one end of each coil terminated to one end of another coil (referred to as "wound in "wye"). Sometimes the coils are connected in series and referred to as wound in "Delta". Each phase of a "Wye" wound alternator generates voltage across two coils while a "Delta" wound alternator generates across a single coil. Therefore, wye wound stators tend to be more compact to generate the same voltage as a delta wound stator.

Commonly the alternators produce approximately 30 to 50 "peak to peak" AC volts - the rectifier flips half the sine wave which drops the peak voltage approximately in half and the voltage available to charge the battery is the average between zero and peak voltage. So, an alternator producing 30 VAC has approximately 15 volts of pulsating DC to charge the battery. Revving the engine increases the frequency of the AC voltage being produced which raises the average of the rectified voltage available to charge the battery. That's where the "regulator" comes into play. The regulator shunts all voltage over 14.8 to ground so if the regulator is operating properly, you will see no more than 14.8 volts across the battery terminals. As the battery discharges, the regulator will stop shunting voltage to ground (this is usually set at about 13.4 or 13.6 volts) and the voltage to the battery increases. As the battery charges and the voltage increases, at about 14.8 VDC the regulator "turns on" and sends excess voltage to ground. This is one of the reasons most rec/reg units are somewhat large and finned. Changing AC into DC creates heat and shunting excess voltage to ground creates heat too.

That is the short version of how a permanent magnet AC generator (alternator) works.

Now, what can go wrong with this type of charging system...........

A permanent magnet alternator produces AC voltage at the maximum value all the time. The average voltage (read by a common multimeter) will increase with engine speed. The peak voltage will remain constant and must be read with a special peak voltage meter, an adapter that lets an average voltage meter read peak voltage or measured with a calibrated oscilloscope.

If one of the 3 coils opens, the output voltage will drop - this is easy to determine with a continuity test

If the insulation between the winding's of wire fails and the coil shorts out winding to winding or if a wire cracks, the output drops, but only under load. Difficult to determine even with a highly accurate ohm meter

If the insulation of the winding fails on any one coil and the coil wire shorts to ground, the output will drop to near zero, but under certain circumstances, the coil will continue to produce voltage between the lead wire and ground. Under this condition, AC voltage may be present between the terminals of the battery. A short to ground is easily determined with a continuity test. The stator must be replaced when a short to ground is detected.

A simple, single phase full wave rectifier has 2 diodes while a 3 phase has 6. The diodes can open (like a fuse) or short (conduct in both directions). If a diode shorts, you can have AC voltage at the battery, which will kill the battery.

In either case (alternator winding shorted to ground or shorted diode in the rectifier) there can be AC voltage getting to the battery. The regulator may still be doing it's job limiting the voltage to 14.8 volts, but if it's AC voltage the battery will be damaged.

Incandescent lights on the other hand are DUMB - they don't care if they are operating AC or DC and they will operate on both higher and lower than nominal voltage without failure. A typical 12v headlight may operate just fine at 16 volts without burning out prematurely and lowering the voltage almost never damages one. LED and High Intensity lights are a different story.

End of this long story - you could have a failed part of your charging system causing the short life of your battery. The odds of getting one properly activated bad battery is pretty high - getting 2 is like getting struck by lightning - getting 3, there has to be another problem somewhere.

I am not into writing text books and I hope this is not confusing or inaccurate. It is to the best of my knowledge correct and may help you determine the problem with your charging system. There are tests that are not in the book.
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-13-2018, 06:42 AM
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WOW! Thank you so much for great info...for now though I will replace with AGM batt and if need be will look at charging system...only so many parts to replace...Thanks again...
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 10-13-2018, 07:33 AM
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I prefer to only replace the parts that need replaced and not replace the parts that are doing what they were designed to do. It just so happens if the system is not tested, you can install all new parts and it may still not work. It doesn't happen often, but I have seen bad flywheels cause a no charge condition. So far it has been several Kawasaki Tecate 2 strokes, a Yamaha YFB250 Timberwolf, an Arctic Cat 400 with a Suzuki engine, a Honda TRX250R, a Chinese quad that someone had used a hammer on to try to remove the flywheel, a Polaris 500 that someone had used a large 2 jaw gear puller on and a 1986 Harley Sportster where the flywheel was the back side of the clutch basket. Most of the flywheels that failed due to natural causes are those that run dry. The only "run wet" flywheels that I have seen fail due to natural causes have been Suzuki, Arctic Cat and Harley. I'm sure other mechanics have witnessed other failures - no make or model is immune.
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