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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am new to the site and am looking for input on a 2004 Magnum 330 4x4. The origin al CDI box burned up on me soon after I purchased the unit 2 years ago. Literally burned a hole in it. I replaced the CDI module with a new one and seemed to work ok however i have noticed a burning smell again from the front of the unit and have checked battery voltage. It is elevated some time to around 16 volts. I don't see a separate voltage regulator on the machine. The Stator appears to be controlled by the CDI box. Any assistance would be appreciated.
 

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Welcome to the board!:med:
 

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You should check with your local dealer. There is a recall on those models for faulty ECM's (#29) that can cause fires. You may get it replaced by Polaris.



If you've already replaced the CDI (#11) you should tell him about that too.

 

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Welcome to the forums!
 

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2003 Polaris Magnum Voltage Regulator Location

Can anyone tell me where the voltage regulator is at on a 2003 polaris magnum. I have had the plastic off and cant seem to locate it.
 

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There's a limiter located in the front to the left, it has 3 female wires coming out, then there's the ECM in the very front and if think that acts as the voltage regulator. Still doing research, hope that helps part # 4010684
 

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Hi everyone. I just bought my first ATV, it's an '03 Magnum 330 4x4. I recently noticed the fan for the oil cooler wasn't working so I replaced the thermistor on the top of the radiator. Now my stator plug on the bottom of the voltage regulator started smoking and melted the plug. I unplugged the thermistor and it doesn't seem to smoke now but for all I know the thing is now broken. I'm not really sure what would cause this to happen because all I did was fix what seemed to be a broken part. I've been trolling the forum and I can't really tell if just replacing the control unit will fix my issue. I'd hate to spend a bunch of money on one and have it burn out right away. any suggestions? Is it possible to bypass this regulator with something less expensive that you'd see in an older car or something?

I replied to this thread because it seemed like a similar issue. Thanks in advance for any help.
 

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The plug with 3 yellow wires are the alternator stator wires for charging the battery - they overheat for two primary reasons; 1) a poor connection and 2) running with a defective or severely discharged battery, but a corroded connection is the most common fault.

Install a new connector on the wiring harness and with luck it will fix the charging issue - test the current draw of the fan motor - have the battery thoroughly tested along with the charging system.

The bad news is the unit is no longer available - an experienced and talented mechanic can install a separate rectifier/regulator from a Honda, Yamaha or other model vehicle with a 3 phase charging system - the yel/red wire will have to tied to one of yel alternator wires to provide a signal to the reverse speed limiter - the brn/wht wire will have to be connected to ground for the AWD to work and the AWD may be active in reverse with out pushing the override button and the only function of the override button will become to override the reverse speed limiter - The thermister (which has a solid state output) will have to be replaced with a temp switch wired between the red/wht or a red/blk wire directly to the fan and the orange/black of the fan wired to ground - the hot lamp wire (blu/wht) will be left unconnected and the hot lamp will no longer function unless a second heat sending unit can be installed somewhere on the engine to turn the hot lamp on between 205 and 210 degrees F.

I estimate about $500 to $600 for the conversion.

Here's the unit wiring diagram:
142562
 

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The plug with 3 yellow wires are the alternator stator wires for charging the battery - they overheat for two primary reasons; 1) a poor connection and 2) running with a defective or severely discharged battery, but a corroded connection is the most common fault.

Install a new connector on the wiring harness and with luck it will fix the charging issue - test the current draw of the fan motor - have the battery thoroughly tested along with the charging system.

The bad news is the unit is no longer available - an experienced and talented mechanic can install a separate rectifier/regulator from a Honda, Yamaha or other model vehicle with a 3 phase charging system - the yel/red wire will have to tied to one of yel alternator wires to provide a signal to the reverse speed limiter - the brn/wht wire will have to be connected to ground for the AWD to work and the AWD may be active in reverse with out pushing the override button and the only function of the override button will become to override the reverse speed limiter - The thermister (which has a solid state output) will have to be replaced with a temp switch wired between the red/wht or a red/blk wire directly to the fan and the orange/black of the fan wired to ground - the hot lamp wire (blu/wht) will be left unconnected and the hot lamp will no longer function unless a second heat sending unit can be installed somewhere on the engine to turn the hot lamp on between 205 and 210 degrees F.

I estimate about $500 to $600 for the conversion.

Here's the unit wiring diagram:
View attachment 142562
OK, I'll try swapping that connector out and clean up all the grounds and try swapping the battery. Thanks for that detailed explanation, I really appreciate it.

Is there a way to test the regulator to see if it is somehow still working? My guess is fix the plug and see if it charges the battery? haha
 

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There is 3 primary parts to the charging system; the stator (supplies AC voltage), the rectifier (changes the AC into DC) and the regulator (no external wiring other than the red battery wire and the brown ground wire - the regulator simply limits voltage to the battery to no more than 14.8 volts)

It easy to test - with a fully charged battery, start the engine and run at about 2500 RPM - the voltage across the battery terminals should climb to 14.8 and then fall to 13.? then increase to 14.8 and fall - this repeating cycle is the regulator cutting in and out to control charging. This verifies the alternator, rectifier and regulator are all working as designed.
 

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There is 3 primary parts to the charging system; the stator (supplies AC voltage), the rectifier (changes the AC into DC) and the regulator (no external wiring other than the red battery wire and the brown ground wire - the regulator simply limits voltage to the battery to no more than 14.8 volts)

It easy to test - with a fully charged battery, start the engine and run at about 2500 RPM - the voltage across the battery terminals should climb to 14.8 and then fall to 13.? then increase to 14.8 and fall - this repeating cycle is the regulator cutting in and out to control charging. This verifies the alternator, rectifier and regulator are all working as designed.
Gotcha, thanks for all this info latebird. Hopefully will get this all worked out this week. Hope to have this thing up and running for hunting season ;)
 
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