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That'll pare me down to two motor oils on the garage shelf. Rotella T6 & VW 505.01 spec stuff for the PD TDI.
Maybe one. Shell's Rotella T6 is a HDDEO - heavy duty diesel engine oil. Might work satisfactorily for the TDI too. I use it on everything (but i have no diesels). Luck!
 

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Not enough EP adds in the witches brew to use in the BEW BRM PD engines. VW did a poor job of cam design. The lobes are too narrow for the pressures involved so they wipe out even with the reccomended oils. BEW Cams are a PITA to replace... I'll push that job off as long as possible by sticking with the 505.01 certified Castrol, Motul, or ELF even tho they are high dollar oils. Schaeffers would have more than enough zinc and moly but might have enough to poison the exhaust catalyst and it costs about the same as the Castrol TXT.

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You do not have to run bike oil, an ATV is not a bike and automotive oil is just fine. You can run Mobil 1, Rotella and several others. Mobil 1 is the only 0W40 available in my neck of the woods. If they don't have that run any synthetic brand of 5w40 or 5w50. Lot of guys are having good results with Rotella t6 as well and it comes in a 5w.

Its odd you say that a ATV isn't a motorcycle. Because I have always put it in the same class as a motorcycle not a automobile. More for mechanical reasons then the number of wheels it has. I guess the question here is what is the different in the two oils, motorcycle or automobile? The cost of the oil? which can cost almost twice as much for a motorcycle then a car.
Polaris does not use wet clutches in the Sportsmans, no need for a Jasa ma spec oil. However, Rotella T6 0/5W40 is well worth the investment.
 

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I have been using mobil 1 20w 50 in my 500 scrambler since the very first oil change and I bought it new and still have it...not one engine problem in 14 years and still runs like a new one...The only oil i will use.
 

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I have been using mobil 1 20w 50 in my 500 scrambler since the very first oil change and I bought it new and still have it...not one engine problem in 14 years and still runs like a new one...The only oil i will use.
You're not doing your engine any favors by running a 20W-50 oil. A 20W oil is far too thick when cold and provides very little lubrication when starting a cold engine. 90% of engine wear occurs during cold starts, so when your engine needs the most lubrication, you're giving it almost none. ("cold" meaning an engine that's not warmed up to normal operating temperature)

While you may have not had any problems, 0W-40, 5W-40, or 5W-50 would be much better for your engine.

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I have been using mobil 1 20w 50 in my 500 scrambler since the very first oil change and I bought it new and still have it...not one engine problem in 14 years and still runs like a new one...The only oil i will use.
You're not doing your engine any favors by running a 20W-50 oil. A 20W oil is far too thick when cold and provides very little lubrication when starting a cold engine. 90% of engine wear occurs during cold starts, so when your engine needs the most lubrication, you're giving it almost none. ("cold" meaning an engine that's not warmed up to normal operating temperature)

While you may have not had any problems, 0W-40, 5W-40, or 5W-50 would be much better for your engine.

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I have thought about the lighter weight in oil but was concerned about the high heat of the engine is why I chose to go with that weight of oil.
 

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I have been using mobil 1 20w 50 in my 500 scrambler since the very first oil change and I bought it new and still have it...not one engine problem in 14 years and still runs like a new one...The only oil i will use.
You're not doing your engine any favors by running a 20W-50 oil. A 20W oil is far too thick when cold and provides very little lubrication when starting a cold engine. 90% of engine wear occurs during cold starts, so when your engine needs the most lubrication, you're giving it almost none. ("cold" meaning an engine that's not warmed up to normal operating temperature)

While you may have not had any problems, 0W-40, 5W-40, or 5W-50 would be much better for your engine.

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I have thought about the lighter weight in oil but was concerned about the high heat of the engine is why I chose to go with that weight of oil.
I think you're not quite understanding how oil grades work. First, forget the term "weight" when talking about oil. The correct term is "grade". Most people think the "W" after the first number means "Weight". This is wrong. It actually means "Winter". So the first number is the "winter" grade and the second number is the grade when hot.

A 20W-50 will have the viscosity of a 20 grade oil when cold, and the viscosity of a 50 grade oil when hot.

A 5W-50 has the viscosity of a 5 grade oil when cold, and a 50 grade oil when hot.

So, both 5W-50 and 20W-50 are the same grade when hot, but the 5W-50 is much thinner when cold. This means it will flow through your engine much easier when it's cold, while still providing the same protection when it's hot.

Now, if you compare say a 10W-30 and a 0W-40, the 0W-40 is thinner when cold, but also thicker when hot.

A straight 30 grade oil will be a 30 grade no matter what the temperature, so would be thicker than a 20W-50 when it's cold, and thinner than the 20W-50 when hot.

Hope this helps.

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You do not have to run bike oil, an ATV is not a bike and automotive oil is just fine. You can run Mobil 1, Rotella and several others. Mobil 1 is the only 0W40 available in my neck of the woods. If they don't have that run any synthetic brand of 5w40 or 5w50. Lot of guys are having good results with Rotella t6 as well and it comes in a 5w.

Its odd you say that a ATV isn't a motorcycle. Because I have always put it in the same class as a motorcycle not a automobile. More for mechanical reasons then the number of wheels it has. I guess the question here is what is the different in the two oils, motorcycle or automobile? The cost of the oil? which can cost almost twice as much for a motorcycle then a car.
Polaris does not use wet clutches in the Sportsmans, no need for a Jasa ma spec oil. However, Rotella T6 0/5W40 is well the investment.
T6 5w40 is more of a universal choice with the Vulcan, Sportsman, 3 diesel trucks, LS4 Impala SS, and a lightly used 1200cc 4 stroke Yamaha sled on the way... The rods on my 92 Indy 440 parted company with the crank today, with no warning, right after initial startup. After 21 years of faithful service RIP to my old smoky buddy. :( OTOH No more smelling like and breathing two stroke fuel.:D:beer:

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Honestly, the only number that really counts is the first number of a multi-viscosity oil and the lower the better. Oil technology has changed so much over the past 25 years it's pretty incredible but it's a hard to swallow change. The second number should be followed per the manufactures recommendation in most cases.

The only reason you want a thicker oil at start up is if you have a "loose tolerance" or wore out engine which could have a lot of ring blow by. A thinner oil in this case would cause greater oil consumption, plug fouling and greater emissions....but less wear.

Also, the only reason a manufacturer today would suggest a 15W, 20W or Straight 30 oil is due to emmission standards. Another reason is because that is how it "always was". It was drilled into my head as a kid that you run straight 30 in your lawn mowers and similar small engines and I did that for years just because of habit. 0W just sounds strange, looks strange and how can Zero be good for anything? Bigger is always better right? 20W has to be better than 0W? Well, 0W it is good for your modern ATV engine so that's what I run.

Just 20 years ago the availability of even 5W oils was pretty scarce as these thinner oils were difficult to make with petroleum bases. With synthetic oils the world opened up but it took a while for that technolgy to mature and prove itself. If you are still running Dino oils this converstation isn't really for you as you are in the dark ages.

Currently the thickest I run in small engines (mowers, generators, etc..) is a 10W30 synthetic. Once again, I should probably run a 5W but I am making an educated guess that these engines are not spec'd at tight as others. The mower I have with a Honda engine recommends 10W30 so I just run that accross the board in my power equipment so I don't have to carry a bunch of different oils.

In the winter many engines won't even start with a straight 30 weight. My dad has the same generator as me and he was running straight 30 and I was running 10W30. He couldn't pull hard enought to get it to start cold and mine would fire on the first pull. He now runs 10W in all his small engines. His buddy that works on small engines was a hard sell but he even gave in and made the switch to 10W30 synthetics in all his small engines with much sucess.

The best thing I ever did was go to the "Bob is the Oil Guy" website and read all the literature on oils. Pretty amazing stuff but many have a hard time breaking old habits but there are always baby steps.

Remember, "Thinner is the Winner", maybe that is what the "W" should stand for!

I can remember back in the 70 and 80's if you got 100k miles out of your car or truck you were doing really good. Now engines will go way past 200k if you take care of them and that is directly related to oil technolgy. There are other reasons but Thinner Viscosity Multi-Grade oils are the biggest driver of longer lasting engines.

If I offended anyone I apologize as it was purely intentional! :slomo:

By the way, after sitting outside under a cover for 60 days my 850 running 0W40 Mobil 1 European Automotive Formula oil and started as soon as I touched the starter button yesterday :).
 

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You're not doing your engine any favors by running a 20W-50 oil. A 20W oil is far too thick when cold and provides very little lubrication when starting a cold engine. 90% of engine wear occurs during cold starts, so when your engine needs the most lubrication, you're giving it almost none. ("cold" meaning an engine that's not warmed up to normal operating temperature)

While you may have not had any problems, 0W-40, 5W-40, or 5W-50 would be much better for your engine.

Sent from my HTCONE using Tapatalk
I have thought about the lighter weight in oil but was concerned about the high heat of the engine is why I chose to go with that weight of oil.
I think you're not quite understanding how oil grades work. First, forget the term "weight" when talking about oil. The correct term is "grade". Most people think the "W" after the first number means "Weight". This is wrong. It actually means "Winter". So the first number is the "winter" grade and the second number is the grade when hot.

A 20W-50 will have the viscosity of a 20 grade oil when cold, and the viscosity of a 50 grade oil when hot.

A 5W-50 has the viscosity of a 5 grade oil when cold, and a 50 grade oil when hot.

So, both 5W-50 and 20W-50 are the same grade when hot, but the 5W-50 is much thinner when cold. This means it will flow through your engine much easier when it's cold, while still providing the same protection when it's hot.

Now, if you compare say a 10W-30 and a 0W-40, the 0W-40 is thinner when cold, but also thicker when hot.

A straight 30 grade oil will be a 30 grade no matter what the temperature, so would be thicker than a 20W-50 when it's cold, and thinner than the 20W-50 when hot.

Hope this helps.

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It sure does because I never could understand how oil could be a thicker grade so too speak when its hot than when its cold...I was only really focusing on the hot thinking it got alot thinner.
 

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I have thought about the lighter weight in oil but was concerned about the high heat of the engine is why I chose to go with that weight of oil.
I think you're not quite understanding how oil grades work. First, forget the term "weight" when talking about oil. The correct term is "grade". Most people think the "W" after the first number means "Weight". This is wrong. It actually means "Winter". So the first number is the "winter" grade and the second number is the grade when hot.

A 20W-50 will have the viscosity of a 20 grade oil when cold, and the viscosity of a 50 grade oil when hot.

A 5W-50 has the viscosity of a 5 grade oil when cold, and a 50 grade oil when hot.

So, both 5W-50 and 20W-50 are the same grade when hot, but the 5W-50 is much thinner when cold. This means it will flow through your engine much easier when it's cold, while still providing the same protection when it's hot.

Now, if you compare say a 10W-30 and a 0W-40, the 0W-40 is thinner when cold, but also thicker when hot.

A straight 30 grade oil will be a 30 grade no matter what the temperature, so would be thicker than a 20W-50 when it's cold, and thinner than the 20W-50 when hot.

Hope this helps.

Sent from my HTCONE using Tapatalk
It sure does because I never could understand how oil could be a thicker grade so too speak when its hot than when its cold...I was only really focusing on the hot thinking it got alot thinner.
The second number in a multigrade oil denotes the viscosity demostrated at operating temperature (212 degF hot), not at standard temp of 75 degF. So a 0W40 and a 20W40 oil will be the same at operating temperature (hot) but the 0W will thicken less than a 20W as it cools back down to 75 degrees.

A hot 40 grade oil will be thinner in overall viscosity at operating temperature than a 0W40 would be at 75 degrees.

That is why most manufactures want you to warm the engine prior to draining the oil as it's overall viscosity thins as it gets hotter, allowing more thorough draining.

So, they only get thicker relative to operating temperature.

Just the opposite, If you ran a straight 10 weight oil at 212 degrees it would be much thinner than straight 30 at 212 degrees. However, at 75 degF a straight 10 weight oil and a 10W30 would be identical in viscosity.

Clear as dirty oil?
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Well now its winter and the temperature is running around 0. I found out why NOT to use 10W-40 oil. After buying a new battery it still barely turns over to start. Then on top of that it seems to take forever to warm up. I see at the local auto parts store they sell the Mobile 1 0W-40. This coming Monday I am changing the oil to the 0W-40. What are the thoughts on Mobile 1??
 

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Well now its winter and the temperature is running around 0. I found out why NOT to use 10W-40 oil. After buying a new battery it still barely turns over to start. Then on top of that it seems to take forever to warm up. I see at the local auto parts store they sell the Mobile 1 0W-40. This coming Monday I am changing the oil to the 0W-40. What are the thoughts on Mobile 1??
Probably the most used oil by members on this site is Mobil1 0w40. Most important thing is synthetic and a 0w or 5w 40 and changing it per the manual.

IMHO you want a 0W for winter but it also works well in the summer.
 

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You can safely run T6 5W40 year round. It is a true Heavy duty engine oil for both diesel and gas. No need to flip flop.
 
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