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Hello enthusiasts.
i have a starting issue and I am looking for someone with a fresh perspective. I am not new to mechanical diagnostic and repairs. But this issue is baffling to me. Pull starting it starts every time. But when I use the electric start. I don’t get a spark. I replaced the handlebar switch and that didn’t help. I tried jumping the solenoidthinking the switch may still be defective. And still no spark. The only issue that may be contributing is the crank bearing has the slightest movement. And I am wondering if the magneto is being torque to close and causing a electrical problem Any one with a fresh perspective will be greatly appreciated. Thank you friends
 

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Well, the 99 Xplorer does not use battery energy to generate a spark, but the electric starter turns the engine at a constant speed which is slower than using the recoil start. I suspect the stator is failing and higher cranking speed equates to a higher voltage generated in the charge coil of the CDI, but when you say the crank bearing has movement, how much movement? Two strokes are sloppy and loose engines, but physically perceptible movement of the crankshaft could be a factor. The electric starter applies a force to the outside circumference of the flywheel will deflect the flywheel in the opposite direction of applied force. The movement of the crankshaft away from center will affect the air gap between the flywheel magnets and the stator it rotates around. the change in air gap could reduce the generated voltage affecting the charging of the CDI unit. The recoil turns the flywheel from the center and no (or very little) deflection of the flywheel occurs to affect air gap. Also, the recoil starter turns the crankshaft faster than the electric starter - thus the voltage generated is greater and the compression is raised also due to the higher crankshaft and piston speed.

Just replacing the stator might be a fix, but it may require a crankshaft bearing replacement for a fix. If the flywheel movement is greater than .014 inch, I would replace the bearings first and the stator later if needed. It's also possible replacing the crankshaft bearings would result in a loss of spark due to a correct and maintained generator air gap. If the crankshaft movement is .012 or less, replace the stator now and the crank bearings later when necessitated by leaking crankshaft seals. Or do nothing and see what eventually goes completely bad and confirms my assessment.
 
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