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Discussion Starter #1
Removed the carb and cleaned the living bajebus outta it

Installed a new oring on seat under the float( needle seemed in great shape)
Reassembled and still getting the over leakin by (bottom line on the carb)

My question is does the line hanging lower then the carb cause it to siphon and does it have to be elevated to have the line above float level to create a float back pressure

How do you add pics to these post?
Lol
 

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You often can't really SEE a problem with the needle valve. If you don't want to replace it then a good polish of the seat and needle may do it.
I use a q-tip cut in half and chucked in a drill with at little metal polish. Just run it a few in the seat and then a little on a rag to do the needle tip. Usually slicks them right up and they will seal.
Also make sure the float has no issues while you have it apart.
 

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And NO! The drain tube hangs straight down. The needle valve cuts off the flow when the float pushes on it because the bowl is full.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks
I’m gonna order a new complete rebuild carb kit for it tm and go that route
I used the metal polish(brasso) and it cleaned up wicked
I took this bike on trade so god knows what they got done to it lol

Cheers
 

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Also check the float level while you have it apart too. If others before you have monkeyed with it they may have it set too high. Check that the bowl drain screw is seating/sealing and doesn't have a piece of grit under it too.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
According to the manual I have its all good in that avenue
Kit ordered today
Rebuild next week
Thanks for the info and assistance
Cheers
 

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While you have it apart, check the overflow tube in the float bowl. You could have a split in that tube. I ran into it on a Honda motorcycle engine. Latebird can replace the tube if you need to. To check it, fill the float bowl with water and plug the top of the tube with your finger. Blow air into the overflow on the bottom of the carb. If you get bubbles in the water then the tube is bad.
 

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@polman - I see you use the float needle seat polish trick too.

I use a wad of 0000 steel wool pressed into the seat with a small screwdriver and turn the wad inside the seat with said screwdriver - it works faster than brass polish. Also you mention using a Q-tip? Paper or plastic shafts just don't work for me. I buy electronic cleaning 'Q-tips'. They are about 6" long and have wooden shafts. The wood is somewhat brittle and will break easily if too much side pressure is applied, but you can definitely apply more pressure than you can with a 'Q-tip'.

For corroded or otherwise damaged edges of the hole where the float needle has to seat, I will drop a small bearing ball into the seat and use a brass drift to hammer the ball against the hole - the steel ball will 'crush' small imperfections into a smooth slightly tapered, perfectly round seat. Quick fix when you just don't want to install a new seat due to cost or time restraints. A new seat is best, but sometimes...................................
 

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@polman - I see you use the float needle seat polish trick too.

I use a wad of 0000 steel wool pressed into the seat with a small screwdriver and turn the wad inside the seat with said screwdriver - it works faster than brass polish. Also you mention using a Q-tip? Paper or plastic shafts just don't work for me. I buy electronic cleaning 'Q-tips'. They are about 6" long and have wooden shafts. The wood is somewhat brittle and will break easily if too much side pressure is applied, but you can definitely apply more pressure than you can with a 'Q-tip'.

For corroded or otherwise damaged edges of the hole where the float needle has to seat, I will drop a small bearing ball into the seat and use a brass drift to hammer the ball against the hole - the steel ball will 'crush' small imperfections into a smooth slightly tapered, perfectly round seat. Quick fix when you just don't want to install a new seat due to cost or time restraints. A new seat is best, but sometimes...................................
Hmm, I'll have to try the steel wool. Hadn't thought of that. And yeah, the regular q-tips are kinda fragile to work with. Thanks for the tips latebird...pun intended. :grin
 
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