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Discussion Starter #1
I replaced the brake pads both fronts and the rear on my 2 2002 Sportsman 500 HO Atvs. The replacement went well without any problems. As part of the replacement, I bled the brakes and the brakes work well. My problem/concern is that they seem to apply some stopping effort when the brakes are not applied. I was hoping that they would just wear in. I have ridden them about 50 miles and they still seems to be dragging. I stopped and checked them after riding for awhile and they were hot to the touch. They run but it takes greater effort to get them going and I can push them while in neutral but it takes greater effort.

Could I have done something wrong, overfilled the reservoirs or something else; Or do I just need to let them wear in. The brakes work great when they are applied.

Thanks in advance for you input.
 

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Over filling the reservoir is a possibility - the fluid needs to be about 1/4" below the top of the reservoir when the cap is installed - too little air space in the reservoir can cause pressure on the pads as the fluid heats, but you may not have adjusted the caliper properly - back off the clearance adjuster set screw on each front caliper about 1/2 turn.
 

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Sounds like the caliper adjustment is to tight. Personally I tighten the adjustment screw until pad/rotor contact is made then back the screw off 360°.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for your input. I did not know there was any adjustment and just tightened the set screw fairly snug. I will back it off per your adjustment recommendations hopefully this weekend and I am pretty sure that is the problems. Thanks again.
 

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Yup that's def your prob if you didn't adjust from the get go.
 

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Yeah, that's likely the problem. Your caliper has a stationary pad and a moveable pad. You turn the set screw until the stationary pad contacts the disc and then back it off 1/2 turn.
I'm also wondering why you'd bleed any fluid when simply replacing pad? Unless you've had a leak or lost fluid during repairs or you're changing the fluid there's no reason to ever bleed or add fluid. When the fluid shows low the pads need replaced. When you push the caliper pistons back in to replace the pads the reservoir will be full again. Having the reservoir too full can also create problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I did only to replace the brake fluid since it was original 18 years old. Otherwise, I completely agree that bleeding is unnecessary. I hope to check this set screw this afternoon and it will be an easy fix.
 

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I did only to replace the brake fluid since it was original 18 years old. Otherwise, I completely agree that bleeding is unnecessary. I hope to check this set screw this afternoon and it will be an easy fix.
Put a little drop of blue Loctite on the set screw threads and you should be good.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Follow up adjustment worked great

Just a follow up. I adjusted the set screws, backed them all the way off, put a drop of blue loctite and put them back in. I was kind of hard to tell exactly when to stop, I put them in until I had some resistance on the brake and then backed them off a 1/2 turn. You don't need to take the wheels off but I did and it made it a lot easier. Thanks again for the great assistance.
 
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