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Discussion Starter #41
Apparently you guys do not understand how the stationary brake pad adjuster screw works?
The calipers have a moveable pad and a stationary pad. The screw is used to adjust the stationary pad so its correctly oriented to the brake disc.
Pump the brake lever till pressure it built up. Apply a drop of blue loctite to the screw threads and insert it and turn the adjuster screw all the way in until the stationary pad contacts the brake disc. Then back it out 1/2 turn. They ALL have to be set that way for the brakes to function correctly.
Just pulled all 4 of them. Backs are nice and firm, fronts won't build any pressure. Front handle is spring tension only.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
Spent the entire day going over everything, and re-bled the entire system. Still no front brakes. I am officially stumped. Did everything everyone suggested.
 

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Well, I guess I should add my 2 cents here...........

The easiest way to bleed brakes is to start at the rear - remove the pad adjuster set screw from all the brake calipers prior to starting this operation. Remove the caliper and brake pads, make sure the hand brake MC reservoir is full and use the foot brake to pump the caliper piston 3/4 out (as the piston moves outward the fluid level in the hand MC should drop) - cover the MC with a shop towel or similar to prevent brake fluid from geysering out - use a C-clamp, position the caliper so the brake line to the hand MC is at the apex and depress the piston into the caliper. The process works this way; as the caliper piston is pumped out with the foot brake, vacuum pulls fluid from the hand brake to the caliper piston chamber, then pressing the piston back into the caliper pushes fluid back to the MC and the fluid pushes air to them MC to evacuate air from the system. This may need to be repeated a few times to assure all the air is out between the rear brake and the hand brake MC. Leave the c-clamp on the rear caliper holding the piston in the fully depressed position.

Move to the front brakes: make sure the brake fluid level is adequate - start with the right front - remove the caliper and pads - operate the hand lever to try to get the caliper piston to move outward (even with air in the system, each operation of the lever will (or should) move the piston a small amount. When the piston is about 3/4 out, position the brake line at the apex and push the piston into the caliper with a c-clamp - do this two or 3 times, leave the piston depressed and then move to the left caliper. Same process.

When done and all three caliper pistons are fully depressed and held by c-clamps, you should be able to get good pressure at the lever - pull the lever to put pressure on the system and proceed to crack the line fittings starting at the master cylinder - maintain pressure on the system and crack each line fitting at every junction - finish at the calipers and complete the job by cracking the bleeder screws.

Now with the brake system bled and pressurized, release the hand lever, top off both front and auxiliary MC reservoirs and seal the system (install the covers/caps) - remove the c-clamps, install the brake pads and install the calipers - operate both the hand brake and foot brake simultaneously until all the brakes are firm. Now re-bleed the brakes conventionally.

Starting with the foot brake, apply and maintain pressure to the rear brake - crack the line fitting only to the point of seeing fluid, and do the same for the bleed screw then progress to the hand brake - apply pressure and crack the bleed screw to the point of seeing fluid on all three calipers. Install the stationery pad set screw securing with loctite or vibratite - 24 hours later recheck the bleed screws for any residual air that may have collected.

Now since air will rise within the system and collect at the master cylinder, each time the vehicle is parked, turn the handle bars to the left to position the MC at the highest point and at a random moment before a ride, apply the brake and crack the line fitting at the MC just to see if any air has become trapped in the fitting. and the process is completed.

Now, do not add fluid to the brake system - the drop in fluid level is an indication of the amount of wear on the brake pads - when the fluid level has dropped sufficiently, inspect the pads and replace when necessary.

Note, when the pads are replaced, re-bleed the system conventionally then remove all the old fluid from the MC reservoirs and refill with fresh fluid.

If this procedure does not work, you need to take it to a professional.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
Well, not the way Polaris intended, but I have strong front and rear brakes. I pulled the line to the lower MC from the handle bar and capped it off. Plugged the lower MC, and bled the whole system. Nice firm brakes finally. Down side is front only controls front. For what I will be doing with this machine, should be good to go. Thanks for all of the help and ideas! I really appreciate it.
 
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