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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all. Having an issue with a non responsive transmission. The Ranger (i am told) was slipping and all of the sudden quit pulling all together. My first thought was broken belt. I removed the belt cover for inspection and noted that the center securing bolt on the secondary clutch was loose (falling off loose).
I thought well here is my problem and slid the clutch off the shaft to inspect for secondary damage. Well as you can emagon the bolt was damaged at the tip and the threaded hole was also damaged. I used a tap to chase the threads in the end of the transmission input shaft and bought a new bolt. While chasing the threads i used a pair of vice grip pliers to hold the shaft while turning the tap. With the vice grips in place i turned the input shaft and the rear axles attempted to turn but the weight of the vehicle was keeping me from actually moving it. This told me that the enturnal of the transmission were still working (well sort of working). The splines on the shaft were in good shape and the splines inside the clutch were not worn for about an inch and show wear on about one inch (worn for about one inch from the bolt and not worn closer in at the transmission) I installed the rear clutch and belt. Cranked the engine and the rear clutch turns but the ranger wont move. I removed the rear clutch and took it to the dealer for dismantling. Everything looks good except the worn area on part of the splines. My question is has anyone had this issue and what was the outcome. I am going back out the the shop tomorrow to inspect the shaft and also the front clutch right now i am a little confused.
 

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The drive clutch is locked on the end of the crankshaft. It MUST turn anytime the engine turns unless its slipping on the shaft... Unlikely but I have heard of it... Never saw it though.
Start the machine in Park or Neutral with the belt cover off. When you rev the engine up is the drive clutch closing and grabbing the belt? Is the belt being pulled down into the secondary clutch making it spin?
If the answer to both is YES, then it is NOT a clutch or belt problem!
The problem is in the tranny/rear end.

With the engine off and key on can you hear the turf mode solenoid in the rear end working in and out when you flip the switch in and out of turf mode (up/center positions)? If not, see if you have power to the solenoid... fuses, wires etc.
If the rear differential lock solenoid/turf mode seems to be operating:
Jack it up and get all four wheels off the ground for testing.
Start the engine. Put the AWD switch in 2x4 (center position) and shift to High.
Give it some fuel... Do the rear wheels turn?
Try it in AWD (down position). All four wheels should spin.
Try it in turf mode (up position). One wheel should spin.

Let us know what you find.
If you get no joy and its been a while since the tranny oil was changed, drain the tranny oil into a clean container and inspect it for metal.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well guys I feel a little sheepish this morning. :grin This old school mechanic is slipping. When inspecting the Ranger I neglected to look at the axles to see if one of them was spinning when the vehicle was put into gear. If I had just put the switch into 4x2 or 4x4 it would have moved but when the left rear axle outer cv joint explodes and you have the switch in 4x1 all indication is catastrophic transmission failure. I feel like a novice, it's all good tho I did find the loose bolt on the secondary clutch before something else went amuck and it needed some new control arm bushings any way.
 

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Nothing to be sheepish about. You found the problem and now know what it takes to fix it... That's what mechanics do lol!!
I wasn't sure how experienced you were and suspected it may be an issue to do with the turf mode. That's why I wanted you to tell us what you found after checking it out. Most folks, mechanically inclined or not, don't know that "turf mode" is actually one-wheel drive.
IMO, its sorta like ADC on some of the atv's. Its a specialized function that should ONLY be used when needed to prevent tearing up the lawn. Its NOT for everyday use! And especially so on a big heavy four-seater machine. When in turf mode you're putting the entire force of moving the machine on one relatively tiny set of splines on only one axle and when in a tight turn the forces are multiplied exponentially. If that drive mode is used all the time the splines on that one axle will wear out very quickly as you just discovered. The really bad and VERY expensive part is that it also wears the splines in the rear end. Just replacing the axle won't fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I am glad you straighten me out on this as I was under the impression it was better for the unit to be run in 1 wheel drive. After your explanation I see the reasoning for running in 2 wheel drive until 1 or 4 wheel drive is needed. Thanks man I will pass this on to the guys at the lease.
 

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I am glad you straighten me out on this as I was under the impression it was better for the unit to be run in 1 wheel drive. After your explanation I see the reasoning for running in 2 wheel drive until 1 or 4 wheel drive is needed. Thanks man I will pass this on to the guys at the lease.
LOL, well I'm sorry if I sounded like I was preaching at you. That's not how I meant it. It's just that I work on a lot of different machines and often see problems that could be avoided if folks better understood how things work.
Turf mode is only to keep from tearing the grass up when you turn in the yard.
2x4 is for normal everyday use on dry ground or roads.
AWD is designed so it can be selected anytime you are off road or may encounter slick, soft or rough terrain. You don't have to wait till you're stuck or get to a bad place. In AWD the machine still runs in 2x4 unless the rear wheels slip a little. Then the front axles lock in automatically without you even feeling it. They unlock as soon as traction is regained. All without the driver even noticing. That's the beauty of Polaris' AWD system. As soon as you leave the road you can just flip the switch to AWD and forget about it. The front wheels engage and disengage automatically "On Demand" only when needed.
 
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