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Discussion Starter #1
newbie to sportsman here.. swapped from Honda and Suzuki.

Ijust picked up this 570 sportsman hunter edition that I’m in love with. However, took it riding this weekend and battery ‘low voltage 10.5-10.8v’ came on randomly. It never died but it ran like $**t... sputtering, back firing and dying at idle.

i have since drained the tank and replaced with ethanol free, which helped the: full throttle to no throttle back fires, but still dies at idle.

I pulled battery, cleaned terminals and load tested- all good. Charging volts show around 14v.
Pulled the spark plug and it seems a little lean (white). Pulled air filter and it’s good. Idles between 1200-1250. It’s about 100* outside temp here in Texas.

I have been told a “reflash” could help...
 

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Get a fuel pressure reading. Should be between 56-60psi.
 

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The random low voltage problem may have been fixed with the terminal cleaning and tightening which in turn may have fixed the idling and running problem. You did not state if the problem persisted after the work.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Sorry, after cleaning the terminals, I did not see a change in idling or running. It still has a slight bit of a problem on a cold start, I have to bump the starter a couple times for it to turn over.

However, after draining old gas and adding ethanol free gas, the idling issue still persist but the sputtering, after letting off the throttle, has Diminished 100%.
 

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Since it's fuel injected, you are limited to what you can do without the diagnostic program and interlink - you are relegated to getting the proper tools or taking it to a dealer for adjustment or repair.
 

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If it ends up being the fuel pump, I suggest getting the fuel tank heat shield Polaris added to the 2017's because of the heat issue. It might save the new pump.
The part number is 5263226 for the shield and there's a screw 7517386 & nut 7670096 to secure it to the frame at the bottom.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Sorry for late response, the forum was giving me trouble logging in...

anyways, I did a self diagnoses on the issue and was unable to find a fix: changed plugs from colder to hot. Removed air box and filter and cleaned and replaced. Seafoamed and drained gas. Nothing fixed it. I was seeing a“lean” look on my plugs so I decided to pull the tank.

inside the tank I first noticed the fuel pump system has been removed before and inside the tank has quite a bit of debris. I removed the files pump and housing and noticed the electric motor and misc rubber pieces have been melted (or what looks melted). I will try to attach a picture to show. Prior to removal I conducted a pressure test and was reading 20ish psi. Thanks for y’all a help! New pump ordered tonight and will be in tomorrow.

Indy, funny you say that about the heat shield. I was just debating, since the gas tank is out, mine as well heat shield it... then I log onto the forum and see what you wrote.
Excellent work, how this will help someone in the future.

P.S. the quad ran find at WOT and idled OK, but died during idling after 1-2 minutes!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So, the fuel pump replacement kit I ordered shows good reviews and fitment for the 15 570. But, it also shows 58 psi pump pressure. Does anyone know if this is okay? Should I kept my same regulator or swap to the new one?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Not sure if it really made a diff. But I went with a new heat range of 8 (compared to 6) and it doesn’t hesitate near as much when it’s running at higher temps.
 

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If the OEM plug was tan, then that’s what I’d use. I’d not go hotter.
 

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Just FYI

Copied from the NGK website

Typically the heat range for NGK Spark Plugs varies from 2-11. This number indicates the thermal characteristics of a spark plug, or how ‘hot’ or ‘cold’ a spark plug is. The term hot/cold is commonly used to describe whether a spark plug heats up easily (hot) or whether it provides resistance to heating up (cold).

Generally, low power engines such as lawn mowers don’t produce a large amount of heat, hence use a low heat range (or hot) spark plug such as a 4 heat range. This means the spark plug will heat up easily and reach its optimal operating temperature. High performance engines on the other hand produce a large amount of heat, hence a high heat range (or cold) spark plug such as a 10 heat range needs to be used to resist the heat developed by the engine.

Several factors influence the heat range of a spark plug, although typically the insulator nose design provides an indication of the heat range of a spark plug.

When a spark plug absorbs heat produced from combustion, the heat is transferred through the centre electrode and insulator nose to the metal shell, which then transfers the heat into the engine casing and circulating coolant.

heat-range-1


A low heat range (or hot) spark plug typically has a long thin insulator nose which will heat up easily however will not dissipate readily to the metal shell (above left). Conversely, a high heat range (or cold) spark plug has a short thick insulator nose which will dissipate heat much easier (above right).

When the heat rating is too high:

The spark plug temperature remains too low and causes deposits to build up on the firing end; the deposits offer an electrical leakage path that gives rise to loss of sparks.

When the heat rating is too low:

The spark plug temperature rises too high and induces abnormal combustion (pre-ignition): this leads to melting of the spark plug electrodes as well as piston seizure and erosion.

NGK Spark Plugs pioneered the use of a copper cored electrode in 1958, which enables a spark plug to heat up quickly and also dissipate heat quickly giving an ultra wide heat range. It is essential to use a spark plug that fits a specific engine and its conditions of use.

As spark plugs are positioned in the head of an engine, their analysis can give a good indication of how your engine is operating.

heat-range-2


The operating temperature of a spark plug varies between 450-870°C. At 450°C the spark plug reaches its self cleaning temperature; this means that carbon deposits which are produced during combustion are actively burnt off the insulator nose. When too many carbon deposits accumulate along the insulator nose carbon fouling occurs and engine misfire may occur. If the temperature of a spark plug exceeds 870°C overheating may occur leading to spark plug and possible engine damage.

operating-temperature


From other NGK technical literature:

In identical spark plug types, the difference fron one heat range to the next is the ability to remove approximately 70*C (160*F) to 100*C (212*F) from the combustion chamber. A projected style spark plug firing temperature is increased by 10* to 20*C (50 to 70*F)

While it is generally safe to change to a hotter plug by one heat range, it it totally dependent on fuel and operation of the engine. While the only downside to going to a colder plug is more frequent fouling, going hotter under demanding operating conditions may result in engine failure.

Changing of the heat range does not produce a stronger spark, easier ignition, a hotter burn or more power.
 
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