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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, so my voltage regulator got fried for a second time on the weekend. My factory regulator lasted about 2500 miles and this one, an rm stator regulator lasted about a thousand miles. The last one did the over voltage deal and I replaced it so I didn't do any damage to my electronics. But this rm stator just about started on fire. I noticed my low voltage warning and within about 30 seconds, my machine shut down and smoke was pouring out of the regulator and the guts were dripping out onto my winch. I have cleaned ALL my connections after installing the rm stator, as the wires going to it from the stator were what I thought was too hot. I have all good grounds and can't find any bare wires anywhere. So I guess my question is how hot do your wires get from your stator? and what kind of voltage regulators are you having luck with? thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I tested it when I replaced my last regulator and everything was in spec. Ill check it again before I install my new one. You never know.
 

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The stator generates voltage and the voltage is the push behind the amperage - the rectifier changes the AC voltage of the generator into DC voltage to supply the electrical system (lights, winch, AWD magnet coil and stereo, gps, cell phone?) - the regulator has to provide enough amperage to run all the add on's and 1.5 amps to charge the battery. What amperage was the system designed to supply and how does the rectifier/regulator dissipate the heat (watts) generated by the load on the battery? Most rec/reg's fail from excessive heat either from abnormally high current draw or failure to shed the heat and ultimately a combination of both. What mods (if any) have increased the current demand of the electrical system? High wattage lights? Additional lights? Even LED's draw current and HID lights draw more than either incandescent or LED (in most cases, but it depends on the lights and the input current of the device.

Keep in mind, that as voltage decreases, amperage increases. To get 60 watts of illumination from a light bulb requires 5 amps at 12 volts - the same amount of light at 6 volts requires 10 amps of current - as the battery voltage drops, the charging system is taxed with supplying additional amperage to supply the wattage hungry accessories.

Survey your vehicle and estimate the amount of amperage required to operate all the equipment without consideration of charging the battery. How many amps does the fuel pump, fuel gauge, speedometer, headlight (on high beam), tail light, brake light (both on at the same time), dash lights, clock, clearance lights, ground effects lights, cell phone charger, GPS power supply, radio, stereo, CB radio, heated grips, thumb warmer, work light, spot light what ever you have that is normally on at the same time even if only for one day or a portion of a day. The diodes or MOSFET (metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor which operates the same as a diode) is what normally fails and heat is the killer. The device can open like a fuse or short out and become a simple conductor.

Either reduce the draw or cool the unit more effectively
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the info. I know how it works and why. I'm running basically stock. My issue is it seems awfully hot idling in my driveway with no lights or accessories on.
 

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Thanks for the info. I know how it works and why. I'm running basically stock. My issue is it seems awfully hot idling in my driveway with no lights or accessories on.
It is not charging at idle - it is operating at a loss - technically everything the alternator is generating is going straight to ground (through the regulator to the lights, fuel pump and other things) and the battery is likewise discharging through the regulator to ground but at a low rate. Fastest way to run a battery dead other than just leaving the lights on and walking away is to let the vehicle idle and walk away (I presume if it's parked and idling the parking brake is set and the brake light is on even if the lights are turned off).

Long periods of idling (more than 5 minutes) is hard on the battery and the charging system - typically, 15 minutes of engine speed above 2500 RPM is needed to recharge the battery after running the starter motor for 10 seconds - an hour of engine speed above 2500 RPM is needed to recharge a battery after 5 minutes of idling.

Automotive products 'over drive' the alternator - it spins at appx 3X the idle speed of the engine - it has heavier windings, is fan cooled and rated at a minimum of 30 amps and can be as high as 100 amps. The ATV alternator spins at the same RPM as the engine, is enclosed and usually rated at about 14 amps. The 2013 850 Sportsman has an alternator rated at 475 watts at 1200 RPM (575 watts peak) - watts is heat, heat is the result of amperage passing through a resistance - the resistance could be a headlight, starter motor or the windings of the alternator itself - therefore, if the alternator is generating 35 volts AC at 1200 RPM and 45 volts at 3000 RPM (watts divided by voltage equals amps) it is providing 13.6 amps at 1200 RPM and 12.8 amps at 3000 RPM - it gets hotter at idle than at speed.

I don't recall replacing a rec/reg on any of my toys other than my 67 Harley Sportster and with a mechenical DC regulator and my 72 Triumph 650 Bonneville which used a Zener Diode as the regulator, but I did replace the stator in my VT1000 (damn thing uses a special battery that costs $116 and I rode it the last 3 weeks of riding season by bump starting it instead of replacing the battery. The next spring I installed a new battery and later in the year put in a new stator. I figured the rec/reg would go next, but that was 3 years ago and it hasn't failed yet. I just make sure I connect it to the 750 milliamp Battery Tender a couple days before I intend to ride and so far so good.

But, I replace a lot of rec/reg, stators, batteries and an occasional flywheel for other people.
 

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Had Same exact issue

300 miles the factory reg went, it was also out of warranty. Replaced with rm then that one burnt wire harness to stator almost caught fire. So I replaced stator and regulator at 600 miles, I have been checking the wires regularly and they are not hot at all, after a long ride slightly warm to the touch but not much. I also rerouted my wires up the right side for easy access Incase they melt again.
 

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Take a look at your stator wires that leave your stator and run down by your oil filter and up by your battery. They may have rubbed through and are shorting out.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ok, so update... I went to charge my battery and when I did I see the positive terminal is partly melted. I pulled the battery and it took a charge fine. I cut the wires from the stator to the regulator , as the plug had already melted on me last year and I hard wired them. Installed my battery, fired up my fourwheeler and it ran fine. Tested the stator again and everything is in spec... I figured it must have been a bad regulator, so today I installed the new regulator and when I went to start it.... dead battery? It almost looks like the positive terminal has been melted a little more. I have checked all my positive battery cables and cables to the winch to see if something has worn through , but nothing... I have the battery back on the charger and am going to do a draw test when its charged, but has anyone had a positive ground in their winch? Thats about the only thing I can think that could draw enough amps to melt the battery terminal. All of my connections were clean and tight. Mark
 

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Well I just tested it with the battery charged. No major draws and winch drawing nil with key off. Looks like its just time for a new battery. Hope its good for another year. Thanks for the help guys.
 

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Well I just tested it with the battery charged. No major draws and winch drawing nil with key off. Looks like its just time for a new battery. Hope its good for another year. Thanks for the help guys.
if you're getting a new battery Canadian Tire sells a Eliminator AGM sealed battery with more cranking amps for about $130 regular price.
 

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I have over voltage issue on my 2018 completely stock 570. I just reached 25 hour maintenance break in interval. I replaced the voltage regulator and check all wires for grounding and everything looks fine. Ran great entire ride and when I went to back it off trailer the error popped up. No idea where to look next, Any suggestions greatly appreciated. Curious as to why disconnecting battery doesn't reset error, seems like it should be no error condition when key is on but not started after batter installation and it still shows error, is there a factory error reset procedure on the 2018?
 

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I put the plastic sheathing over my wires coming from stator and inspected the wires closely and have found no chaffing but at 25 hours I am getting over voltage error and the Voltage Regulator didn't fix it. I have been all through wiring and can't find any issues that look like a short or wire issues. Very frustrated!
 

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no warranty, 300 miles currently on machine, bought used and it was very lightly used with 242 miles in excellent condition. Ran great on a 60 mile ride and then wouldn't run to take it off trailer.
 

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OV can occur when DC voltage goes above 15 volts or if AC voltage is bleeding into the DC circuit - this can happen if the stator develops a short to ground - test the stator, if the stator is not shorted to ground, replace the rec/reg
 
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