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I own two(2) 2019 Polaris Sportsman XP 850’s, which are just now 6 months and a week old (thats right, just out of the warranty). Last night I noticed that one of them has a rear suspension issue that I cannot figure out, so here we go. A few weeks back, I was doing some jumps (1-2 feet max) and a few other trail shenanigans, but nothing too crazy. The left rear side of the quad is now sitting about 3-4 inches higher and the right is around 1-2 inches higher than its sibling. I have done an exhaustive search beneath the chassis and around all components. I cannot find any differences between the one that is sitting straight and level and the one that is now significantly higher. Ive jumped on the rear end up and down several times and it lowers a little but is still pretty high. Best I can determine the left rear spring is either stretched out, or the shock strut has too much resistance to retract without weight. I have yet to disassemble both sides to compare static measurements, but have verified that on a jack at the frame, there is still an off camber tilt to the body in relation to the frame; suspension is my only logical decision at this point.

Any help would be appreciated. I will update this with photos when I return home today. Break- I did set about 150 lbs on the left side over night to see if things settled out, it helped a bit but if i lift up on the back end, it returns to the lifted tilted state.
 

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Jumping (which is not recommended and not for what the vehicle was intended to do) can bend frames, shocks, suspension components, damage linkages and twist various components. Even vehicles intended to absorb the abuse of jumping can be damaged iby jumping. I saw an armored personnel carrier destroyed by plowing through some trees at high speed during a training exercise at Fort Knox. Never mind it was designed to withstand the blast of mines and it was bullet proof, trees were it's demise. Don't worry about it, just continue to abuse it until it looks like other abused ATV's. By the way, damage caused by abuse is not covered by warranty anyway.

PS: I have a bad attitude this morning
 

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Jumping (which is not recommended and not for what the vehicle was intended to do) can bend frames, shocks, suspension components, damage linkages and twist various components. Don't worry about it, just continue to abuse it until it looks like other abused ATV's. By the way, damage caused by abuse is not covered by warranty anyway.
Yeah, I got carried away but I would like to see if I can find the issue. If I were to start somewhere, where would that be? I would like it to be the way it was, before I gacked it up.
 

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Start by measuring - length of shocks, distance from rigid parts to movable parts, look for cracks in the paint (may indicate bending or twisting) - compare measurements of one to the other.

Guys with Honda's, Kawasaki's and other non IRS quads bitch when they bend axles jumping. When I jumped my old 1972 G5 100cc Kawasaki and bent the footpegs upon landing I was brokenhearted, but I got the frame straightened and reinforced, installed beefier footpegs in place of the rubber covered pipe the original footpeg was made of and went right back to jumping. I twisted the swing arm, bent the forks, put a flat spot on the rear rim and ultimately broke the frame, but it didn't deter me, I just got a different bike that was more intended for what I was determined to do to it. I broke Honda's, Kawasaki's, Suzuki's, Yamaha's, Harley dirt bikes (made in Spain and Italy), Hodaka's, Maico's, Bultaco's and a Rockford (Rockford was a Bridgestone sold by the Rockford Motor Company in Rockford IL - similar to a Cooper - Cooper was a re-branded Yamaha DT2). I never broke a Cooper because I never raced one, but I broke a DT2 and as a historical note, American Eagle Motorcycles were re-branded Kawasaki's.

Finally in 1997, I got a bike I couldn't break - a 97 Honda XR250 - raced it 7 years and got an 04 CRF250 - I haven't broken the CRF either
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks, thats right in line with my thinking. I am a former aircraft mechanic, so this isn’t a lift; just wanted to see if there was anything out there as a known issue for things like this. I’m assuming that I have a shock piston issue. I plan to take them both off and slowly lower the rig to see if it sits level absent the dampener and coil spring. I will also compare the static lengths of those components too. So far, no cracks in welds, frames, bending or torsion is visible. Nor are there any indicators. That’s why I leaned more toward a failed component (failed by way of using in a way it was not intended to perform)
 

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Check some basics first - obvious, I know, but worth checking anyway. Tire pressure, coil spring preload settings and visual inspection for any cracks/bends to the frame (I know you noted you saw none). Only then would I start tearing into suspension, etc. What happens when you jack up the whole rear end of the bike - do the sides hang the same?
 
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