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Discussion Starter #1
I'm wondering how exactly this works. I haven't noticed much of a difference between 4x4 and 4x4 adc. The manual states to use it whenever climbing or descending a hill. Already seems like there is a lot of engine braking. I see there is a fluid reservoir for the adc so it got me questioning how it works. Is there harm being done not using it?


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I'm no expert and someone who knows more will probably chime in but my understanding is when descending a steep hill if will automatically apply the brakes in addition to the engine braking system. I don't really use mine unless it's a super steep hill.

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From my experience the ADC control is for very steep hills. I hardly use mine as there seems to be engine breaking as it is.
The only way to wreck your machine when using it is if you leave it on when your just driving normally. Although I wouldn't use it going uphill either.

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Discussion Starter #5
I've gone down some pretty steep hills and really noticed no difference. I didn't know if I was harming the cvt by not using it, so if that's not that case I'd rather not use it unless absolutely necessary to avoid accidentally leaving it on during normal driving.


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EBS is rear wheel engine braking, ADC is front wheel engine braking.
You should notice a big difference in how fast your atv comes to a stop.
If you start down a very steep slippery hill and the rear wheels are sliding, you can turn on ADC and then the front wheels will hold back also. ADC connects the front wheels to the engine, nothing to do with the brakes.
Other brand atvs have 4 wheel engine braking if in 4wd, since Polaris uses AWD the front wheels don't hold back unless ADC equipped.
 

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EBS is rear wheel engine braking, ADC is front wheel engine braking.
You should notice a big difference in how fast your atv comes to a stop.
If you start down a very steep slippery hill and the rear wheels are sliding, you can turn on ADC and then the front wheels will hold back also. ADC connects the front wheels to the engine, nothing to do with the brakes.
Other brand atvs have 4 wheel engine braking if in 4wd, since Polaris uses AWD the front wheels don't hold back unless ADC equipped.
Thank you for your insight.... That is something I didn't know..... Or never thought of before because it makes sense.

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It just forces the atv into 4wd when no throttle is applied. IMO it is way too slow to go down a hill like that and the brakes work just as good.
 

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It just forces the atv into 4wd when no throttle is applied. IMO it is way too slow to go down a hill like that and the brakes work just as good.
Not everyone rides like a madman busting up their atv as they go.
Does your 570 even have ADC?

So you let your truck in 2wd while creeping down a power line too?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
EBS is rear wheel engine braking, ADC is front wheel engine braking.

You should notice a big difference in how fast your atv comes to a stop.

If you start down a very steep slippery hill and the rear wheels are sliding, you can turn on ADC and then the front wheels will hold back also. ADC connects the front wheels to the engine, nothing to do with the brakes.

Other brand atvs have 4 wheel engine braking if in 4wd, since Polaris uses AWD the front wheels don't hold back unless ADC equipped.

Thanks for the explanation. Ok so how does it work, why is there a fluid reservoir for the adc why does it use separate fluid? Seems like it would just electronically engage the front diff to connect the from wheels to the engine.


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EBS is rear wheel engine braking, ADC is front wheel engine braking.

You should notice a big difference in how fast your atv comes to a stop.

If you start down a very steep slippery hill and the rear wheels are sliding, you can turn on ADC and then the front wheels will hold back also. ADC connects the front wheels to the engine, nothing to do with the brakes.

Other brand atvs have 4 wheel engine braking if in 4wd, since Polaris uses AWD the front wheels don't hold back unless ADC equipped.

Thanks for the explanation. Ok so how does it work, why is there a fluid reservoir for the adc why does it use separate fluid? Seems like it would just electronically engage the front diff to connect the from wheels to the engine.


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The adc switch sends power to a magnet which turns and sends hydraulic fluid to clamp the clutch pac. The reason a Polaris with ADC can stop on a steep hill is that the front and rear gear ratios are different. It doesn't hurt a thing to ride around with AWD engaged all the time but if you have adc on everytime you slow down it will engage and wear the clutch packs. Just flip the switch at the top of a nasty mt. Flip off at the bottom.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the explanation it makes sense now.


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The engine breaking on Polaris isn't as strong as some others and u can tell quite a bit of diff between adc and no adc on really steep slippery hills. I used it going down a muddy double black at hatfield last weekend and I literally could take both hands off the bars as it inched down the hill....I only used my brakes maybe once or twice on that hill....the grizzly and can ams were riding the brakes all the way down. I am a believer in adc on very steep, slippery descents.


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The adc system is computer controlled.. Nothing to do with the engine.. The computer needs to sense that there is zero throttle being applied and that you are travelling slower than 15mph.. It then sends a signal to the front diff which is programmed to not allow the machine to travel more than 5mph'ish.. I don't know what speed its actually calibrated to maintain as you descend a hill but its in the 5mph range.. Once you hit the throttle or turn the adc off, it is disengaged..
 

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I use mine only on really steep downhills. I can go down some really steep grades with the only input to my machine being one hand on the handlebars. Meanwhile, the Grizzly's, Rincon, and Brute Force guys I ride with are standing on their brakes and doing a not-very-controlled slide on the rocks.

Most of the time I leave it off, even on downhills, but when the hill is steep enough to cause my weight to shift in the seat, ADC gets off the bench and into the game.
 

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Active Decent Control - Change Fluid Often!

I used my ADC last weekend during a club fun run and noticed while going down a steep muddy path the ADC was clicking, grinding and crunching. I thought I broke something and turned it off.

I took it to the dealer and they said the ADC fluid should be changed about every 20 hours or this can happen. I've never changed the ADC fluid before and the machine has about 2100 miles on it. They said they flushed the system twice for me and it seems to be working fine again. They still have my machine so I won't know for sure until I get it back.

Hopefully it's fixed, I'm not replacing the unit if it's gone. Too expensive.

For those of you that have ADC - CHANGE THE FLUID.
 
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