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I want to make a homemade snorkel kit for my Sportsman 700 but I'm not sure where to start. Anyone have any suggestions...pictures etc.??? :dunno:
 

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How about a snorkel kit (homemade or otherwise) for an '09 Sportsman XP 850?
 

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I made one for my 2009 Ranger Crew. I just had to get inside to the engine and take pictures of how it looked before I pulled the stock breathers off. On the Ranger Crew, there are two for the transmission and one for the intake. (Thats the one with the filter in it.)

Then I took everything off and used 1" radiator hoses, PVC Fittings for the tight bends and made a route for the new snorkels to come out and stick up. For me, I had to drill some holes in the frame behind the back seat to stick the new tubes in between the back seat and the dump bed in the back.

It was a lot of work and I had to make sure that every joint was air tight, but it worked!



I later learned I had to do the same with the radiator and fan, because the mud fouled it and it overheated. That is why you see the radiator and fans up on the roof! :scratchchin:
 

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I made a kit for my 07 700. You'll need to snorkel the engine intake, and the clutch intake/exhaust vents. While you're doing that I'd suggest rerouting you're breather lines (fr/rr diff., t-case) to one of the clutch vents. There is also a breather hole on the coolant reservior cap. I ended up drilling it out and tapping a breather line to it then running that to a clutch vent as well.

Those are the items that need to be taken care of when building a kit. Other than that. Use you're imagination on where you want your stuff running to. Really, the sky is the limit.







Also, I'd suggest adding a fan kill switch. No sense in burning out a fan motor when trolling around in water..
 

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I made a kit for my 07 700. You'll need to snorkel the engine intake, and the clutch intake/exhaust vents. While you're doing that I'd suggest rerouting you're breather lines (fr/rr diff., t-case) to one of the clutch vents. There is also a breather hole on the coolant reservior cap. I ended up drilling it out and tapping a breather line to it then running that to a clutch vent as well.

Those are the items that need to be taken care of when building a kit. Other than that. Use you're imagination on where you want your stuff running to. Really, the sky is the limit.

Also, I'd suggest adding a fan kill switch. No sense in burning out a fan motor when trolling around in water..
mjohnson,

Great work with the snorkels! You mentioned a couple of places that I may have overlooked. Thanks!

One question though, I was under the impression that the fan disengaged when it went underwater. Sort of like the fan clutch on an old car. You can stop them stop your hand. The fan doesn't stop while in the mud or water?

Well, I guess it no longer matters for me because I put the radiator and two (2) fans on the roof of my crew.

Thanks for the insight! :)
 

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mjohnson,

Great work with the snorkels! You mentioned a couple of places that I may have overlooked. Thanks!

One question though, I was under the impression that the fan disengaged when it went underwater. Sort of like the fan clutch on an old car. You can stop them stop your hand. The fan doesn't stop while in the mud or water?

Well, I guess it no longer matters for me because I put the radiator and two (2) fans on the roof of my crew.

Thanks for the insight! :)
Thanks for the approval. Took about a week to design, and about another 3 days to install, plus a couple runs to the local river to find the weak areas...

I know exactly what you're saying about the fan being easy to stop, but a couple times in the water I've blown the same 20amp fuse. Not EVERY time I'm deep in the water, but sometimes...perhaps when the fan wanted to kick in??? I'm not sure, but I did look at the wiring schematic and the only thing that stuck out was the fan relay and motor are on that curcuit. The other couple things on the circuit didn't pop out to me as being tempermental in the water.

I've thought about putting my radiator up on the front rack, but I don't want to lose the functionality of the front cubby. Although I have no doubt I could come up with a way to make both work, I also sometimes have friends ride up front if they need to get somewhere..and it's nice to have the extra cargo space if needed..
 
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2009 Sportsman 850XP Snorkels

How about a snorkel kit (homemade or otherwise) for an '09 Sportsman XP 850?
When I was up at Rally Motors picking up my 09 850XP and saw that they had done a snorkel setup on one of their 850XP's. http://www.rallypa.com/

Give them a call or drop them an email and see if they can get you some pictures or sell you a parts list or kit.
 

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Thanks for the approval. Took about a week to design, and about another 3 days to install, plus a couple runs to the local river to find the weak areas...

I know exactly what you're saying about the fan being easy to stop, but a couple times in the water I've blown the same 20amp fuse. Not EVERY time I'm deep in the water, but sometimes...perhaps when the fan wanted to kick in??? I'm not sure, but I did look at the wiring schematic and the only thing that stuck out was the fan relay and motor are on that curcuit. The other couple things on the circuit didn't pop out to me as being tempermental in the water.

I've thought about putting my radiator up on the front rack, but I don't want to lose the functionality of the front cubby. Although I have no doubt I could come up with a way to make both work, I also sometimes have friends ride up front if they need to get somewhere..and it's nice to have the extra cargo space if needed..
I understand about where you would put your fan and radiator. You don't have too many options on that little thing. I personally think it is rediculious to have a fan and radiator on these kinds of things! The shoulld be air (or splash) cooled!

When I was talking about the fan stopping, I wasn't talking about an electrical interrupt switch or anything, I was talking about a clutch on the fan itself. I don't remember seeing one and I think my dealer was just talking out of his rear end. On the cars in the 1970s, they actually had a "Fan Clutch". It is where the fan-belt attached to the fan and it was mostly run by centrifical force and the heat in the engine compartment made a spring expand and engaged the clutch. Even though the clutch was engaged, you could reach in and stop it with your hand. (If you were brave enough) They used to rip people off on I-75 in Georgia by one guy looking under the hood and stopping the fan and saying "Look! You have a bad fan clutch!" while the other guy let air out of your tire on the other side of the car, then he would say "Look, you must have a leak in your tire!"

It was a big scam and hit the newspapers when these guys were busted. (I ran into them pulling it on some woman and told her to go to the next gas station, there was nothing wrong with her car.) They weren't too happy with me and still insisted that they were right. I just drove off.

Long story, but that is what I meant about the fan stopping on it's own. After another friend's experience with a stick putting two holes in his radiator and what his dealer said about his fan throwing a stick into the fan, I now believe it is BS. Someday I will take a closer look at my fan.

Now my biggest weak point is my "A-Bars"! They are hollow and bend very easily if you hit a stump or rock hidden in the grass! They replaced the right one last week and as I was driving out of the dealer he said "We found this yesterday after I told you to come and get it". The left A-Bar was bent into a "C" because I must have backed up into something! It was actually worse than the right! Now when I turn left the wheel rubs and I am afraid it will break and leave me stranded.

I ordered the parts and going to fix it myself. (They charge $80 an hour for a "Certified Polaris Technician" to work on it.)

Oh, BTW, we siliconed every electrical connection and joint on the buggy! It looks funky, but hopefully we won't get corrosion or shorts because of it. This was recommended by another friend that used to take his Jeep to the Swamp Buggie Races. So far, so good! If I need to get to that area, a sharp knige and a little scratching with my finger nail uncovers that area. I even found the "ECU". (The Brain) It was hidden behind the wheel fender and side panels! I siliconed the crap out of that!
 
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Oh, BTW, we siliconed every electrical connection and joint on the buggy! It looks funky, but hopefully we won't get corrosion or shorts because of it. This was recommended by another friend that used to take his Jeep to the Swamp Buggie Races. So far, so good! If I need to get to that area, a sharp knige and a little scratching with my finger nail uncovers that area. I even found the "ECU". (The Brain) It was hidden behind the wheel fender and side panels! I siliconed the crap out of that!
That sounds a lot easier that filling the connector with dialectic grease and sealing the points where the wire enters the connector with liquid tape.
 

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That sounds a lot easier that filling the connector with dialectic grease and sealing the points where the wire enters the connector with liquid tape.
Ha!

That dialectric grease sucks! :yikes:

It is sticky as hell and you can't get it off your fingers or the connection if you ever need to get in there.
 

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That's an interesting concept (silicon). I actually just picked up a tube of dialectric grease with plans to go through all the connects, but maybe I'll take that back and get another tube of silicon instead.

I just went to the river yesterday. Not a bad little run. Played in the water for about 20 min or so. Went about 10 minutes upstream. The entire time the clutch cover was under the water and about half the time the water was above the seat. As I was finishing up, I noticed the belt starting to give way (wet) and what seemed to be a misfire. We got her out of the water and I pulled the clutch cover drain plug and a fair amount of water drained out. Let it idle for a bit to dry and everything was back to normal (except the misfire).

Tomorrow I will likely tear apart the front end and diagnose the bad idle/loss of power, and go over all electrical connections with silicon as well.

I've siliconed the crap out of everything I can see that has to do with the clutch but apparently water can still get in...even though at just a slow rate. Meaning, it is perfectly functional for mud holes or playing in slop, but doesn't meet my standard of being able to park it seat deep in water without issues.

I have an idea that should take care of my 'slow seeping' problem when extended water bogging is expected. Got the idea from my jet ski. The ski is typically waterproof, but in some cases, water gets in the hull and the bildge pump takes care of the issue. I was thinking about taking out the drain plug on the clutch cover and installing a fitting with a hose connected to a mini wet/dry water pump. I'd hook it up to a switch because it won't be needed all the time, just when I intend to play in deep water for a while. The pump would definately have to be capable of running dry, and have enough power to push water against gravity.

What do you guys think?
 

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That's an interesting concept (silicon). I actually just picked up a tube of dialectric grease with plans to go through all the connects, but maybe I'll take that back and get another tube of silicon instead.

I just went to the river yesterday. Not a bad little run. Played in the water for about 20 min or so. Went about 10 minutes upstream. The entire time the clutch cover was under the water and about half the time the water was above the seat. As I was finishing up, I noticed the belt starting to give way (wet) and what seemed to be a misfire. We got her out of the water and I pulled the clutch cover drain plug and a fair amount of water drained out. Let it idle for a bit to dry and everything was back to normal (except the misfire).

Tomorrow I will likely tear apart the front end and diagnose the bad idle/loss of power, and go over all electrical connections with silicon as well.

I've siliconed the crap out of everything I can see that has to do with the clutch but apparently water can still get in...even though at just a slow rate. Meaning, it is perfectly functional for mud holes or playing in slop, but doesn't meet my standard of being able to park it seat deep in water without issues.

I have an idea that should take care of my 'slow seeping' problem when extended water bogging is expected. Got the idea from my jet ski. The ski is typically waterproof, but in some cases, water gets in the hull and the bildge pump takes care of the issue. I was thinking about taking out the drain plug on the clutch cover and installing a fitting with a hose connected to a mini wet/dry water pump. I'd hook it up to a switch because it won't be needed all the time, just when I intend to play in deep water for a while. The pump would definately have to be capable of running dry, and have enough power to push water against gravity.

What do you guys think?
Are those bolt holes on your PVC piping? Did you use PVC Glue to seal the pipe? If not, those might be the source of a leak. You still need to silicone the bolts if you haven't already waterproofed them. I am a retired Firefighter/Driver Engineer and I learned that just a pinhole air leak can run the prime of your suction of the firetruck, so even though there is much lower pressure, water will find a way in. What we did was make the piping in sections that could be easily removed in case we need to get to a specific part. We interspersed the PVC with 1" copper pipe and radiator hoses and hose clamps. This way we don't have to disassemble the whole thing for repair. I understand in your case that probably isn't necessary, but check those bolts!

The sputtering might just be from wet spark plug wires?

I had to replace another "A-Bar" yesterday! I guess I need to get a quantity discount on those things. Those stumps and rocks hidden in the grass play hell on them.



And in case I haven't shown you this short video of where we drive, here is a look at it:

http://manetta.us/hunting/2009/RoughTrail.wmv

Just right click and save it to you computer somewhere and then view it. It is 38 MB. I don't think it is quite what you are used to. :eek2:

The "Regular Gun Season" starts tomorrow and we have a cold front blowing through, so maybe we will see something! Believe it or not I have hunted in Illinois and Colorado, but some of the coldest hunts I ever have had were down here in the Everglades! 40º and cold wet blowing wind will make you miserable! :crying:

Wish us luck! See ya' all on Monday!
 

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I'll inspect the pipes again.

You should look in to a-arm skid plates... I've seen them for the sportsman so I'm sure there are some available for the ranger
 

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I'll inspect the pipes again.

You should look in to a-arm skid plates... I've seen them for the sportsman so I'm sure there are some available for the ranger
I would definately put A-arm guards on it and that will cure the problem.I'm sure replacing them gets to be a pain in the butt and expensive.
 

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Today I tore the beast apart and siliconed the crap out of everything.

I found the issue to the misfire. When I pulled the spark plug wire off the other day, I must have grabbed it by the wire instead of the boot, which coincidently pull the wire further in to the boot (not really noticeable, unless you're looking for it). The wire was able to touch the spark plug with certain vibrations (explains the intermittent full power, then returning to 1 cylinder). I replaced the plugs and reseated the wires.

Before pulling the plugs I noticed there was a ton of mud caked in the hole around the spark plug. I decided to put a bead of high temp silicon around the boot to help keep mud/water out of there.

I finished the day off by siliconing the gauge cluster. The last thing I want is for my digital readout to stop working when going handlebar high in the river...
 

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Today I tore the beast apart and siliconed the crap out of everything.

I found the issue to the misfire. When I pulled the spark plug wire off the other day, I must have grabbed it by the wire instead of the boot, which coincidently pull the wire further in to the boot (not really noticeable, unless you're looking for it). The wire was able to touch the spark plug with certain vibrations (explains the intermittent full power, then returning to 1 cylinder). I replaced the plugs and reseated the wires.

Before pulling the plugs I noticed there was a ton of mud caked in the hole around the spark plug. I decided to put a bead of high temp silicon around the boot to help keep mud/water out of there.

I finished the day off by siliconing the gauge cluster. The last thing I want is for my digital readout to stop working when going handlebar high in the river...
Good Find!

I know I don't have to say this, but in the future, blow that mud out with an air gun or water hose very, very good before you take the spark plug out. All you need is a little bit of dirt to fall into that chamber and... :kater:

Those A-Bar Guards look great! I will have to see if they have them for my Polaris. I think my 2009 model was either the prototype or a lemon version. Polaris has nothing in the way of protection for anything built into it. It is made to be driven around a farm or something? (UTV vs ATV) "Utility Vehicle"!

It held together great this weekend and drove well. But, I need those plates bad before I will feel save now. I have so much crap (tools, jacks, etc) that I must have added a thousand pounds to the damn thing. It sinks easier now and will dig real good holes until I am flat on my frame if I am not careful!
 

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Oh believe me, I blasted the crap out the mud in those holes. I took a pick and broke up the mud. Cleaned out great, but it was a long process. Took about 45 min until I was satisfied. Hopefully putting a bead of silicon around the boot will keep me from having to do that again. I'm going to see if I can head to the river for another test.

Looks like the next thing in order for you (besides the arm skid plates) is a heavy duty suspension and a lift kit!! haha. In all seriousness though, I was actually surprised at how many more trail options openend up to me with 2" of lift and 28" tires. The beast is sittin around 1100lb right now with everything that I've added, plus myself. So it was high centering easily before the lift and tires.
 

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mjohnson,

Good! It is like brain surgery sometimes!

I wanted to call the dealer about a matching pair (front and rear) of these below, but I fell asleep today. The weekend beat me up. We got about 2 1/2 hours a night sleep night. I like these guards a lot!



Also, they have some other nice products too!

Thanks for the tip!
 
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