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Discussion Starter #1
New to the Forum and needing help...

I have a 2017 Polaris Sportsman 570 EFI with very low hours on it. Ever since I bought it new, I have had issues with the starter. At first, I would turn the key and the starter would try to engage but would not. It was almost like the battery was weak. It would click one time (just one time) and you could tell the starter had engaged and was trying to turn the engine over but there was not enough power to do it. You could hit the starter a few times and it would eventually turn over (very strong) and start right up. I did not ride it a lot so I just dealt with it. Well I started using it more so I put a new battery on it. Worked fine the first time out. It set up 2 weeks and I went out and the battery was drained. I turned the key and it just started clicking continuously, the sign of a dead battery. I have now fully charged the battery and it is still just clicking. I will pull the battery off this weekend and check all the connections. It appears something is draining the battery, but also there is the original weak starter issue. Please tell me someone else has experienced this and has a solution.

Thanks
 

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Yeah the starter is most likely weak/NG. It's not common but not unheard of. But before changing it check all the connections from the battery-solenoid-starter. Even the grounds/Neg.
 

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Why did you not take it back to the dealer for warranty?
Why do something like that when you can wait till you have to pay through the nose? P.T. Barnum was right.
 

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Why did you not take it back to the dealer for warranty?


Could be the dealer is some distance away, and attempting a DIY diagnosis and fix is a better first step.
It’s a 17 bought new. By his post I read it that he has had it and now out of warranty. Refer to my previous post.

P.S. My dealer is a 40 mile round trip and I have to pay him $70 for the round trip if you’re going to play you have to pay.
 

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Get yourself a digital voltmeter. Set it to "DC" with a scale of 20 volts or similar--the closest scale value over 15 volts DC. In the ideal world, when you go to start your engine, the starter assembly gets full battery current without any voltage drop along the way. Have someone try to start it when you're making measurements. Don't worry about which lead is positive vs negative. Current needs to go from the TIGHT battery positive to a solenoid somewhere, and return through an equally tight ground path to the tight negative battery terminal.
1) First, measure across the battery. When it is "unloaded", it should measure something on the order of 12 to 14V (if you have the leads reversed, -12V to -14V -- doesn't matter).
2) Attempt to start. If the battery voltage doesn't change much, you don't have a battery problem. If the battery voltage drops considerably; like 10V or less, you have a battery problem.
3) Find the starter/solenoid and measure from the positive terminal to the closest reliable ground point, and try starting. Record that value. It should read within 0.1 or 0.2 volts (DC) of what your first_across_battery measurement was. If you have any drop greater than this, especially a volt or two,
4) Then measure from the positive of the battery to the positive of the starter/solenoid when attempting to start. If this has a greater voltage drop than, say 0.5 or 1.0 Volts, you have a loose positive connection somewhere along the positive path. If this isn't the problem
5) Repeat with the negative of the battery to the closest ground point near the starter/solenoid when attempting to start.

So, around the loop, if all connections are good, you should see something like this when you start: Battery drops a couple of volts max from its charged, no load state. A 0.1 or 0.2 volt drop from positive battery to positive starter/solenoid. A drop from starter/solenoid positive to closest ground very similar to what your battery voltage drop was. And a 0.1 or 0.2 volt drop from the closest starter/solenoid ground to battery negative. Ie, the battery voltage voltage drop = positive (red) wires battery positive to starter/solenoid positive terminal voltage drop plus starter/soleniod voltage drop from positive input to closest ground plus starter/solenoid closest ground voltage drop to negative battery terminal drop. If you always keep the red voltmeter wire closest to the path of positive battery terminal, it will add up (good system) something like: 11.2V = 0.1V + 11.0V + 0.1V under a starting load.

This all should tell you if you have a bad battery, a wiring/connector issue, or a bad solenoid/starter.
 

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In my experience with 2 570's i own they start hard and sometimes have to hit the key a few times to get it going. However the clicking and battery losing power, I had a similar problem with one for years, since my 2016 was new. Replaced several batteries, first under warranty then on my own dime when the warranty ran out. I think (been problem free for 4 months now) my problem was my winch. I have a Badlands with the remote hooked to the battery instead of the ignition, while the winch pulls no power when off i suspect the remote sensor was. I unhooked the winch and think i solved my problems. I would check your winch connection (make sure its hooked to a power line that is off when the ignition is) or other things you may have hooked up that are slowly drawing power causing your battery to go bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I did not use it a lot right after I got it. I did not get it at my local dealer and since I did not buy it from them, they were not real interested in helping me. The dealer I got it from was over 100 miles away. Yes, there is a reason and story for that.

The issue The_real_oc described is just like mine. Its almost like the starter is not strong enough to overcome the compression of the new engine. At least that was the initial problem. Now the consistent clicking is a bad battery. I pulled the batter this weekend and it was almost dry. It is a month old, was filled with acid, charged, and installed. Worked great for a few weeks. I know it did not boil dry. I'm wondering if maybe it got cracked. Either way I am off to get a new battery. And on a side note, whose bright idea was it to put a batter between the front wheels. You have to take the wheel off to make it easier to get to. What happened to easy access under the seat.

I still think there is a parasitic draw. I'm going to go through the test as described by Gregs and a few other test that i have read about. It has no lights, winches, or anything added. everything is stock.

Ill let you know how it turns out. Thanks for the input.
 

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The battery location is a real pain no matter how many times you take it in and out. I would go with an AMG battery so you don't have to deal with the water. The cost difference is pretty nominal. It could be you had a bad battery from the start, seems unlikely (Dealer told me that a couple times in a row). I think i'm using a 220 CCA battery and 190 is stock, so a little more power to turn the motor, but i still have to hit the key sometimes. When i was trying to figure out my issue I would test the battery a lot, for example i would take i out and charge it, it would hold charge, i would put it back on the quad, would hold charge for a week, i'd test a week later and it would be at 11 volts. It just didn't seem to make sense. After you run it for a while, i would probably check to make sure the stator is charging the battery but it seems more to me like a parasitic draw too. Just not sure where it could be coming from.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well here is an update.....I purchased an AGM battery off Amazon and put on the Polaris. I did a parasitic amp draw test and got 0.00015 milliamp draw, basically nothing. I did notice that when the key was on I would get a 12V draw, which is right, when the key was off, it dropped to 6 to 8 volts. I though it would go to zero. The new battery does have higher amps than the previous 2 batteries. So far everything is working. It has cranked without any issues and when I turn on the ignition the gauge usually reads 11.8 or 11.9 volts and jumps to 13.? when i crank it, so all that looks good. Maybe the previous 2 batteries were just bad batteries. Who knows...

Regarding putting the battery between the front wheels, the engineer that came up with that design still needs a boot to the head.
 
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