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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, here is the skinny. I replaced the engine in my 2012 Ranger 800 crew with a re manufactured engine. The new engine came without a stator and in the process of removing the original stator. I dropped it on the floor and broke the darn thing. I ordered and installed a new stator (non polaris) and it has worked flawlessly for 100 hours. The other day one of the lease hands (hired help) called me and said the battery's are dead and one battery may be bad. I told him to cannibalize another Ranger that had 2 new batteries and a bad transmission. He did so and it ran fine until it ran out of electrical power and that is when i stepped in and checked the batteries and charging system.
The original batteries were charged and tested, one was shorted and the other tested good. The replacement batteries were charged and both tested good. At this time it was brought to my attention that when the Ranger failed to start the first time, the hands jumped started the unit by connecting a hot battery to the 2 batteries and connected the cables to the positive post on one battery and the negative post on the other battery. Hooking the connections in this fashion would send 24 volts to the electrical system. Now I test the stator and with the wires disconnected it passed the ohm test but when I started the engine only two legs of the stator passed the ac current test and one leg did not pass. So now I am stumped !? I know the stator is bad but could the original problem be a shorted battery and when it was jumped with 24 volts it burned up the stator? If it is the latter what else did it take out? Regulator? ECU? I don't think it got the ECU because it still runs, Another question is that Polaris now offers a combination Stator/Flywheel, are they having some problems with the flywheel causing problems? HELLLLLLLP!!! 馃槼
 

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What do you mean batteries - you mean battery? The stator is designed to charge one 30 amp battery and supplement the rest of the electrical demand. Having more than one or a larger than 30 amp battery can place an excessive load on the rec/reg inviting failure.

At any rate, the battery has no connection to the stator. The stator simply generates AC voltage which is rectified into DC by the rectifier and limited to 14.8 volts by the regulator. The rec/reg is designed to supply about 1.5 amps to the battery for charging and the battery supplies up to it's capacity in amperage to power everything else connected to the electrical system.

The rectifier can fail in one of two ways; it can open like a fuse and disconnect the stator from the charging system or it can short out connecting the battery to the AC output of the stator. Normally this only results in the battery being overcharged and destroyed. Sometimes the high voltage AC (upwards of 100 volts phase to phase at high RPM) will burn out the lights and other DC powered devices that are in use at the moment of failure.

The flywheel does not contribute to the problem. The flywheel has magnets that rotate around the stator to generate current. Polaris has had some problems with magnets coming loose that can destroy the stator.

If you had two batteries wired in parallel to provide more amp hours - regardless of what battery terminal jumper cables or a jump pack is attached to will not change the voltage to 24 volts - you have to connect + of one 12v battery to - of another 12v battery and then the + of one and the - of the other to the vehicle electrical system to have 24v DC. You can connect - of a 12v to the + of a 6v and have 18v between + of the 12v and - of the 6v and if you connect a 12v jump to the 12v battery you still have 18v, but if you connect a 12v jump to the 6v battery, you will now have 24v on the vehicle's system. No the jump did not contribute to the failure as much as having two batteries being charged by a system designed to charge one battery.

I do not promote the installation of a second battery on an ATV, but If it has to be done, you need to reconstruct the charging system to handle the added load. Short term; split the stator wires and install a second rec/reg to handle the second battery. Long term, send a stator to a rewinder and have it wound for a higher voltage output (smaller wire and more wraps around each pole) - higher voltage = lower amperage - amperage creates heat and heat burns out wiring and devices - higher voltage means it will start charging at a lower RPM - regardless of the AC voltage, the rectifier converts AC to DC and the regulator regulates the DC voltage - with a dual charging system, each rec/reg only has to maintain the battery it is connected to. In this system, the batteries are not wires in parallel, but the electrical system has a parallel power source. One battery and/or rec/reg may fail without affecting the vehicle electrical system.

I guess the root question is, why two batteries?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well two batteries make for more 12 volt when wired parallel and the winch and lighting used on this vehicle require a lot of electricity. We stick these UTV's a lot. and the winch is also used for stretching fence and lifting feeders and stands, before we swapped over to 2 batteries we burned up a bunch of stators and regulators. It is not uncommon to put 300 hours on our utv's in one month. They run constantly because we use them for work, not just week end once a month mud flings. Before we switched to dual batteries I replaced 3 stators before the second year was over. That was 2012 to 2014 and this is the first one (that i didnt drop and break) i have replace since 2014. Lets see that is 5+ years so i am thinking maybe two (standard size) batteries is a better way to go for us. I had to draw out the wiring on paper with the jumper cables hooked to the negative of one battery and the positive of the other and well i still think you will have 24 volts at the batteries but not at the vehicle because the vehicle it is only hooked to one 12 v source.
Master tech. certified for more than 40 years but have been working on cars (foreign, domestic, motor cycle, boat for 52 years.)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Rut Row Scooby I have made a grave mistake latebird is correct. After researching my own diagnosis and drawing out the wiring AGAIN! No 24 volt was ever in the equation. No matter how many batteries you hook up (negative to negative and positive to positive) you will only have 12 volt. Sorry for the mis information.
 

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I do not promote the installation of a second battery on an ATV, but If it has to be done, you need to reconstruct the charging system to handle the added load. Short term; split the stator wires and install a second rec/reg to handle the second battery. Long term, send a stator to a rewinder and have it wound for a higher voltage output (smaller wire and more wraps around each pole) - higher voltage = lower amperage - amperage creates heat and heat burns out wiring and devices - higher voltage means it will start charging at a lower RPM - regardless of the AC voltage, the rectifier converts AC to DC and the regulator regulates the DC voltage - with a dual charging system, each rec/reg only has to maintain the battery it is connected to. In this system, the batteries are not wires in parallel, but the electrical system has a parallel power source. One battery and/or rec/reg may fail without affecting the vehicle electrical system.

I guess the root question is, why two batteries?
Interesting. I'm looking into losing one of the useless "dual exhaust" cans on my 06 800, and replacing with a battery on that side for more power when plowing, since the winch is getting a lot of use, the lights are going, and hot grips/thumb and seat heater are all on.

But I don't want to end up making the charging system worse. My tentative plan, until I saw your post, was to pick up one of these. along with a mount and battery. How short is the short term plan of splitting the stator output?
 

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VERY interesting! I did not know this existed, but it is another answer to the problem. This device allows the charging system to essentially charge one battery at a time from the single on board charging system while allowing current to be drawn from both batteries when needed. It would take a lab test to find out which is better; a dual charging system or this device. Personally, I will go with the dual charging system (similar to two alternators on some diesel powered equipment to charge up to 12 batteries) until it is proven to me this device is up to snuff. The one major difference I see in in the dual charging system I described a winch and some accessories are dedicated draw off one battery while the vehicle and factory accessories draw off the other battery. With this device, the entire system draws off one, the other or both batteries as required and charges one battery at a time, but connecting a battery charger to one battery will charge both batteries. The dual charging system I described will charge both batteries by connecting to a single battery also, but the dual system draws a higher current from the stator as it always charges both batteries at the same time.

Here's the brochure on the device True AM
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Back in the day when people used VW vans for camping a battery isolator was used to charge the camper battery when driving down the road but when camping would not let the vehicle battery discharge while camping. wonder if one of these might work.
 
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