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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Everyone!

Why:
Please help me and others, by contributing to a useful "best practices in restoring an old Polaris Xplorer" thread. Hopefully, we can generate a good list to help myself and the whole community. I can synthesize a checklist including consensus agreements.

Background:
I am attempting to revive a 1998 Polaris 300 Xplorer 4x4 that has been stored in a open-door huge machine shed/pole barn for 10yrs, due to a suspected reverse over-ride switch problem. I get the ATV for free if I can get it running. I tend to believe there are potential problems that could be avoided by pre-starting maintenence...anyone agree? Do we have a related thread already on the topic (I couldn't find one easily)?

So Far:
only preliminary tried to start with pull-starter. Needs new battery. Didn't start.

Planned:
Replacespark plug (needed or not, examine old one)
Replace old gas & replace with fresh
replace fuel filter
Replace Oil change & filter

Clean battery cables
Clean air filter
Clean battery cables
Clean and visually inspect overall machine, remove plastics to facilitate access
Obtain new battery (jumpstart in meantime with car-sized 12-volt)

Help:
transmission flush?
carburetor maintenance?

....Then try starting via car-sized battery and test functionality and find additional problems, determine if further work worth the cost to continue restoration.
 

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My 2 cents worth:

1. Getting it started has to be the first order of business. If it won't run, the rest is a waste of time.
2. If it has been sitting that long with fuel in it, then you will need to remove and clean the carb before you try to start it with the fuel system.
3. If you can get it to crank over, then you can get " proof of concept" with starting fluid. Get the engine spinning and spray a bit into the carb. If it pops and fires, then you know it will run and you can continue to make it run right.

After you get proof that it will fire and run, then you can go into the rest of the stuff.

If it't free, then the time and effort can be worth it. These machines are not that complicated, you can do this! Get a book and follow it.

Good luck
 

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Ok well I just did a 1995 xplorer 400 this past year.

Pull the gas tank and fuel filter. Replace the filter and clean the tank AND the fuel selector

Pull the carb. Strip it and clean it will with cleaner and compressed air. Get a kit. Don't kid yourself into believing it's good enough. Get the kit and replace ALL the parts included

Replace the plug. Use the pull to make sure you have a decent spark

Next check the compression. If it sat that long there is a good chance you will need a piston kit. If you have over 100 lbs then leave it. Of not. Pull the head and cylinder. Get the cylinder bored 10 thou over and get a piston and ring kit to size. You will be VERY glad you did. When you reassemble the piston and cylinder do NOT tap the cylinder down with anything hard. Rubber mallet or wooden block of required.

Check the compression again. If it's still low you will need to replace the crank seals. Behind the clutch and magneto.

Of your compression is good and the carb is good and clean it will fire up.

After that it's all clutch and transmission.

Message again if you get stuck.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks stave7119 & mikeanw,

Seems to be good reasoned advice, and much appreciated. I'm glad I'm asking first, as your replies raise the question of "is it worth the work and parts"? Always, with any older vehicle that'll be the case. Anyone have anything to add or opinions are welcome too!
 

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If you look at my signature, I think you can see what side of the fence I am on. In about 2004, I bought my first machine. I told a buddy that worked at a dealership that I wanted a "project machine". I could justify having an ATV around the property, but not the cost of a new one.

I can't pass an older vehicle for sale without wishing I could take it home and fix it up....

If you have the skills, or are willing to take the project on and learn as you go, then it is definitely worth the time and effort. In '04, I spent about $1500 in parts to get the Magnum up and running. That included new tires. At the time, retail on it was around $3000. I have gotten my money out of it after 10+ years. The older the machine, the harder it is to justify the parts outlay. Just knowing what you can get by with used and what you should buy new will go a long way. Most of these machines will be worth between 1500 and 2000 bucks in good running condition. If you plan on flipping it, then you have to watch the $$$ closely and it might not be worth it. If you plan on keeping it for yourself, not so much. With the first machine, I didn't know shit about finding parts. or the aftermarket. I got lucky with some and paid too much for others. Much smarter about that now. I have also done some machines for others.

I have said it before...there is a certain satisfaction in taking something that didn't work, and fixing it.....A feeling no one who has not done it can appreciate.

I say go for it! If you can make it run, the rest is details...
 
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