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I know this has been brought up before, and most people agree that following the break-in procedure from owners manual is the right thing to do. I'm not arguing. Though, I came across an article that states otherwise, and appears to have some science behind it. I'm not saying I'm convinced, but then again I don't know much about engines. I am curious to see what people on here think.

Break In Secrets--How To Break In New Motorcycle and Car Engines For More Power
 

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I know this has been brought up before, and most people agree that following the break-in procedure from owners manual is the right thing to do. I'm not arguing. Though, I came across an article that states otherwise, and appears to have some science behind it. I'm not saying I'm convinced, but then again I don't know much about engines. I am curious to see what people on here think.

Break In Secrets--How To Break In New Motorcycle and Car Engines For More Power
While there may be some merit to that and similar techniques, it would be my position that one should follow the break-in procedure recommended by the one providing the warranty.

I'm sure such information is being made in good faith, but they are not the ones that will have to live with the consequences should things go wrong.
 

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I've seen that article before and I'm not sure that I buy everything he's selling. While I've broken mine in by the book (no WOT etc), I also rode them like they were meant to be ridden. I do the same thing with my autos and haven't had a problem yet.


Rather be riding, instead I'm using Tapatalk
 

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yea, he keeps talking about the seating of the ring, and the wearing of the cylinder walls, but idk anything about engine internals so I have no idea if his theory makes sense or if it's bogus. I was wondering if anyone on here is an engine-buff
 

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This ring seating talk is all CRAP. The infer provided is only relative to cast iron rings. Nearly every engine manufacture has been using chrome rings for 20+ years.

How to I break in a new engine, generally by the book. I do not abuse it, but I do not baby it either. Like was stated earlier, ride it as it is meant to be ridden.
 

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The ONLY thing relevant to engine brake in, is varying RPM's. Don't take it and sit at the same spped/rpm for hours at a time. The same goes for cars.
 

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it takes years of engine time to wear seats in the cylinder wall, and I was taught that the cross hatch pattern was there to hold the oil on the cylinder wall, which it does and therefore his assertion that it's there to file down the rings is complete crap. The oil would prevent that. Also there aren't "thousands of PSI" in a cylinder. There might be if the cylinder didn't move, but it does and that movement prevents excessive pressure build up in the cylinder.

I think that this guys claims to having links in many different websites is him confusing people calling him out for his crap with people trying to say, hey this is what you should do.

Also break it time isn't just for the engine and as he states, the rings. It's for the entire machine. engine, Trans, Diff, axles, brakes, tires, shocks, springs, linkages, etc.
 

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I get a good chuckle every time I read his BS. Have any of you ever seen a compression testing gauge that reads into the thousands? Normal compression for an 850 is in the 180-210 lb range. Thousands would blow the head off of any engine you will ever own. Maybe a top fuel dragster... And, if you had something "filing" down parts in your engine, you have some large issues with your engine. There is a reason for the break in procedure outlined in the manual. It also helps with the proper break in for your belt, which is important as well.
 

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An article from Yesteryear perhaps?

Interesting article.. any thoughts? - MBWorld.org Forums

Reading these few posts and between the lines this guy was big a few decades ago perhaps.

The post about the break in period being to give a longer life to the transmission and differential makes a ton of technical sense. Even cams need to work harden. bobx2 makes a good point about the belt we need to consider. We know the need to let car tires to fully cure by keeping take off, speed and stops on the soft side for the first 500 miles.

Ring setting today as others have noted is a horse of another color in most cases. Machining and metallurgy is different today as well.

Forgetting the age of the article do you really want an ATV that will win one race or one that will last 2 or more years riding trails before it throws a rod? :duh:
 

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I get a good chuckle every time I read his BS. Have any of you ever seen a compression testing gauge that reads into the thousands? Normal compression for an 850 is in the 180-210 lb range. Thousands would blow the head off of any engine you will ever own.
You should stop your chuckles. He never said thousands of pounds of compression, he said thousands of pounds of combustion pressure. It is a completely different thing. The number of lbs of compression your engine makes is only the number you see WITHOUT combustion. The actual pressure on the piston/rings on a race engine can easily be 1000 to 1500 PSI. Add a turbo to the mix and it climbs from there. Doesnt really apply to this but turbo diesel motors can have peak pressures of over 2500 psi.
 

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Uh...OK. Chuckling stopped. (till I read it again)
 

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"We know the need to let car tires to fully cure by keeping take off, speed and stops on the soft side for the first 500 miles."

That's a new one for me. I have never heard that.
 

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I read most of those links, thank you. They are talking about bead slip from tire mounting lubrication and the residue left over from the mold process. Not so much that the tire needs to cure.
 

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Interesting article.. any thoughts? - MBWorld.org Forums

Reading these few posts and between the lines this guy was big a few decades ago perhaps.

The post about the break in period being to give a longer life to the transmission and differential makes a ton of technical sense. Even cams need to work harden. bobx2 makes a good point about the belt we need to consider. We know the need to let car tires to fully cure by keeping take off, speed and stops on the soft side for the first 500 miles.

Ring setting today as others have noted is a horse of another color in most cases. Machining and metallurgy is different today as well.

Forgetting the age of the article do you really want an ATV that will win one race or one that will last 2 or more years riding trails before it throws a rod? :duh:
QUOTE: We know the need to let car tires to fully cure by keeping take off, speed and stops on the soft side for the first 500 miles.
Gayle, where did you hear this. I made tires for nearly 40 years and have never heard of this. When a tire comes out of a curing press it is ready for whatever you want to throw at it, and is completely cured. The heat that it takes to cure a tire can never be matched just by riding on it, be it easy or hard. Tires are subjected to different time limits for their cure, depending on their design and the compound of the rubber being used, and after multiple hours of curing time, believe me that tire is as cured as it's going to get. If a tire was mounted that wasn't completely cured, it would self destruct fairly quickly, no matter how you were driving
 

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ChickenHawk and Vandal my concept of the tires needing to get hot to cure must have been a false concept I developed 30-40 years ago from listening to old guys talk. Clearly from the links I provided the heat cycle from usage is needed to cook off the external lube on new tires from the building process. Of course there is the physical wearing off of the lube as well.

The lube trapped between the tire and the rim that can cause rim slip from fast take off and or stopping I guess escapes from heat perhaps?

The bottom line is tires need a break in period per the makers and as long as it is done it the main thing in the end. If one is wrong about the WHY for a break in period yet does the break in period correctly then the end results are the same.

It seems the two wheel machines are at greatest risk of crashing due to not doing a correct break-in period.
 

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ChickenHawk and Vandal my concept of the tires needing to get hot to cure must have been a false concept I developed 30-40 years ago from listening to old guys talk. Clearly from the links I provided the heat cycle from usage is needed to cook off the external lube on new tires from the building process. Of course there is the physical wearing off of the lube as well.

The lube trapped between the tire and the rim that can cause rim slip from fast take off and or stopping I guess escapes from heat perhaps?

The bottom line is tires need a break in period per the makers and as long as it is done it the main thing in the end. If one is wrong about the WHY for a break in period yet does the break in period correctly then the end results are the same.

It seems the two wheel machines are at greatest risk of crashing due to not doing a correct break-in period.

I can see being careful with a new motorcycle tire, as they have a much greater tendancy to be slippery until they are scuffed in, but I never break in car tires, and have never heard about bead slippage occurring because of the small amount of bead lube used when mounting tires. Car tires, put em on and give em hell. I'd say it would take a very powerful car to make the bead slip because of the bead lube used for mounting. Racers use bead locks on drag slicks, because they bite so hard that they can actually spin the tire on the rim, but a regular tire....I doubt it very much
 

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I've seen that article before and I'm not sure that I buy everything he's selling. While I've broken mine in by the book (no WOT etc), I also rode them like they were meant to be ridden. I do the same thing with my autos and haven't had a problem yet.
Tapatalk
Same here. Been doing this for many years with everything (auto, motorcycle, boat, atv, etc) that I have ever owned. Never had any problems, and usually end up with a more responsive engine.

That guy's a crack head.
 
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