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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

Long time Can-am rider here, currently owning a 2017 Outlander 1000 XTp Max. I use the ATV for the trails, the occasional MX track and on-road riding in Western Europe. I no longer need a 2up model and am considering to purchase a Scrambler XP 1000. The model that's offered here is basically the 2018 model year package with the red plastics, the digital gauge cluster from the sportsman and it has both ADC and EBS. As you can imagine I have a few questions because this is quite a different ATV than my current one. I did my research but apologize in advance if my questions are already answered on this forum.

It looks like the Scrambler throws a lot of mud in the driver's face, similar to a Renegade. How effective are the 3rd party fender flares that are sold on Ebay? I'm concerned that they are easily damaged when passing around trees on a narrow trail.

Am I missing something, or does the Scrambler have zero storage space. Not really a big deal, I can carry a small back or box on the front or rear rack with me.

Changing a belt is a lot more work than on a Can-am. Do people typically carry the required tools to take of the wheel other parts if the belt fails while you're in the middle of nowhere?

I like the stock location of the radiator. I mean, it's vulnerable but at least it's better accessible than on the Can-am Outlander and Renegade. What do people typically do to keep the mud out? I would add a piece of mesh in front of the grill but read the radiator is not protected from the wheel arches. I'd rather not relocate the radiator.

I love the Fox shocks on my Outlander, they're fully adjustable with rebound and fast/slow compression adjusters. How does that work with the 18 presets on the Scrambler. Did you ruin into the limitations or considering replacing them with fully adjustable shocks? I couldn't find anything on the shocks in the owners manual.

Anybody else who switched from Can-am to Polaris recently? How was your experience, any advice?
 

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Direction 2 makes good fender flares and the are TOUGH!!

No storage to my knowledge.

Belt is tougher to change the because the engine is mounted in a longitudinal direction. But nothing that can't be done on the trail. FYI stock belts and clutching are robust so belt changes if done under a PM schedule should never be an issue out on the trail.

As for the radiator I just keep mine clean. It gets hosed down after every ride like the rest of the wheeler.

The Scramy fox shocks aren't going to compare to the Outy shocks but I've heard they do a good job.

Funny thing you started this thread, I'll be ordering a 2020 Outy XXC Thursday. Supposedly the dealer will have an availability for me by then. It doesn't look like Polaris is going to produce a Scramy 1k for 2020. So it's time to give Can-Am a go. Plus all my buddies are going Can-Am and ditching their Japanese wheelers.
 

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Hi all,

Long time Can-am rider here, currently owning a 2017 Outlander 1000 XTp Max. I use the ATV for the trails, the occasional MX track and on-road riding in Western Europe. I no longer need a 2up model and am considering to purchase a Scrambler XP 1000. The model that's offered here is basically the 2018 model year package with the red plastics, the digital gauge cluster from the sportsman and it has both ADC and EBS. As you can imagine I have a few questions because this is quite a different ATV than my current one. I did my research but apologize in advance if my questions are already answered on this forum.

It looks like the Scrambler throws a lot of mud in the driver's face, similar to a Renegade. How effective are the 3rd party fender flares that are sold on Ebay? I'm concerned that they are easily damaged when passing around trees on a narrow trail.

Am I missing something, or does the Scrambler have zero storage space. Not really a big deal, I can carry a small back or box on the front or rear rack with me.



Changing a belt is a lot more work than on a Can-am. Do people typically carry the required tools to take of the wheel other parts if the belt fails while you're in the middle of nowhere?

I like the stock location of the radiator. I mean, it's vulnerable but at least it's better accessible than on the Can-am Outlander and Renegade. What do people typically do to keep the mud out? I would add a piece of mesh in front of the grill but read the radiator is not protected from the wheel arches. I'd rather not relocate the radiator.

I love the Fox shocks on my Outlander, they're fully adjustable with rebound and fast/slow compression adjusters. How does that work with the 18 presets on the Scrambler. Did you ruin into the limitations or considering replacing them with fully adjustable shocks? I couldn't find anything on the shocks in the owners manual.

Anybody else who switched from Can-am to Polaris recently? How was your experience, any advice?
Consider the sportsman 1000xp. Same basic bike as the Scrambler only with electronic throttle and bigger fenders and more storage. Less $$$ up front also. I have one, it is pretty sporting looking and does a good job of keeping the mud off.

D
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Funny thing you started this thread, I'll be ordering a 2020 Outy XXC Thursday. Supposedly the dealer will have an availability for me by then. It doesn't look like Polaris is going to produce a Scramy 1k for 2020. So it's time to give Can-Am a go. Plus all my buddies are going Can-Am and ditching their Japanese wheelers.
Funny indeed. At this point I don't see any real big difference between the brands, certainly not after you have driven 30 minutes and got used to the different ergonomics and handling. It's just that Can-am currently doesn't offer a road-legal Renegade in my country, otherwise I would've stuck with Can-am.

Thanks for recommending the Direction 2 fender flares. I found a few sellers on Ebay but none shipping to The Netherlands, I'll do some more research.
 

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The belt is no harder to change than the can-am. I have changed belts on both. It freaks people out to see the belt where it is but it is not hard to change at all. The big deal people make out of it is you must take off the rear tire and one support bracket. The can-am requires taking off the entire foot well (which to me is a huge pain in the ass).

How often do you change belts anyhow? I put a new one on at about 5000 miles and sell the bike at around 10,000. One belt change in the life of the bike is not a game changer for me.



D
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Agree, in 10 years riding CVT driven ATV's I broke down in the forest only once. But I'm always carrying a spare belt and the tools to replace it with me since then. Not all Can-ams require to remove the foot well, btw. For most it's just the 13 bolts of the CVT cover. But yes, having to remove the wheel and support the frame while doing it sound like quite an adventure.

Regards the Sportsman, yes that would probably the sensible alternative. But I had Can-am's sensible model for ages now and am ready to buy a more sporty model. I kinda like the aggressive look of the Scrambler, it's not exactly pretty but at least a lot sportier than the Sportsman. Another reason is that at many local events it's frowned upon to enter with a utility model, even though we all know that there's virtually no difference in performance whether you drive a Sportsman or Scrambler, Outlander or Renegade.

The only problem I have with the looks of the Scrambler is the red plastics and decals, personally I like the white plastics from previous model years better.
 

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Hi all,

Long time Can-am rider here, currently owning a 2017 Outlander 1000 XTp Max. I use the ATV for the trails, the occasional MX track and on-road riding in Western Europe. I no longer need a 2up model and am considering to purchase a Scrambler XP 1000. The model that's offered here is basically the 2018 model year package with the red plastics, the digital gauge cluster from the sportsman and it has both ADC and EBS. As you can imagine I have a few questions because this is quite a different ATV than my current one. I did my research but apologize in advance if my questions are already answered on this forum.

It looks like the Scrambler throws a lot of mud in the driver's face, similar to a Renegade. How effective are the 3rd party fender flares that are sold on Ebay? I'm concerned that they are easily damaged when passing around trees on a narrow trail.

Am I missing something, or does the Scrambler have zero storage space. Not really a big deal, I can carry a small back or box on the front or rear rack with me.

Changing a belt is a lot more work than on a Can-am. Do people typically carry the required tools to take of the wheel other parts if the belt fails while you're in the middle of nowhere?

I like the stock location of the radiator. I mean, it's vulnerable but at least it's better accessible than on the Can-am Outlander and Renegade. What do people typically do to keep the mud out? I would add a piece of mesh in front of the grill but read the radiator is not protected from the wheel arches. I'd rather not relocate the radiator.

I love the Fox shocks on my Outlander, they're fully adjustable with rebound and fast/slow compression adjusters. How does that work with the 18 presets on the Scrambler. Did you ruin into the limitations or considering replacing them with fully adjustable shocks? I couldn't find anything on the shocks in the owners manual.

Anybody else who switched from Can-am to Polaris recently? How was your experience, any advice?
the Scrambler has a little storage compartment,
the fox podium x shocks are fully adjustable, the presets are only for rebound.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Great stuff, thanks. Do you know where I can find more information about the shocks? A review or user manual maybe?
 

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BTW, unfortunately this is not accurate. I test drove the Scrambler today and the shocks have a single dial to choose a preset that controles both high speed, low speed compression as well as rebound.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
You're talking about pre-compression. I'm talking about low and high speed compression damping and rebound damping. You don't need Elka's for that, Elka sells models with and without these options just as the Fox shocks on my Can-am are fully adjustable.

Took this pic today:


Fully adjustable shocks have 3 dials instead of one.

Anyway, I test drove the Scrambler today for an hour or so. Took a couple of miles to get used to the extremely light steering, really missing Can-am's adjustable power steering. But after a while I hardly noticed it anymore. Biggest difference with my 2up Can-am is the shorter wheel base, 100 kg weight difference and the stock tires on the Scrambler.

All in all I enjoyed the ride and asked the dealer to prepare a quote. I haven't decided between Ceros or Big Horn tires, but definitely want to replace the stock tires. And need a winch.
 

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You're talking about pre-compression. I'm talking about low and high speed compression damping and rebound damping. You don't need Elka's for that, Elka sells models with and without these options just as the Fox shocks on my Can-am are fully adjustable.

Took this pic today:


Fully adjustable shocks have 3 dials instead of one.

Anyway, I test drove the Scrambler today for an hour or so. Took a couple of miles to get used to the extremely light steering, really missing Can-am's adjustable power steering. But after a while I hardly noticed it anymore. Biggest difference with my 2up Can-am is the shorter wheel base, 100 kg weight difference and the stock tires on the Scrambler.

All in all I enjoyed the ride and asked the dealer to prepare a quote. I haven't decided between Ceros or Big Horn tires, but definitely want to replace the stock tires. And need a winch.
yeah the podiums are not that adjustable unfortunately, i get what ur saying now, i'm only familiar with the Scramblers sorry, we ride mostly rail beds and forest trails up here and i have not had to tighten the coils yet, i have the preset to hardest in front and softest in rear and it handles medium size ruts and pot holes at 40-60 mph all day no problem, i weight about 190 lbs .
 
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