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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have an ingenious way of getting BOTH bolts out of the single shaft on front lower control arm on a 2004 Sportsman 500 HO? One bolt comes out, but then the other one won't because the first one isn't in there to keep the shaft from spinning inside the control arm. I'm not seeing an obvious way of keeping that shaft from spinning so I can spin the other bolt out with my impact.
 

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Put a jack under the a-arm tube and jack it up to see if the weight of the machine is enough to prevent it from spinning as you impact the bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
ok, I'll give it a shot. Anything is better than putting the other one back in, tightening it, then trying again, over, and over. Something about the definition of insanity?
 

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I remove the rear ones by hand (wrench or socket) then remove the front ones with an impact.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I was using an impact the whole time. It would loosen it slightly, then just spin the shaft inside the a-arm. The jack thing didn’t work exactly, but it did raise the a-arm enough that I could get a pair of vice-grips on the other end and eventually get it out. The shaft was badly trashed from rust because this particular ATV didn’t come with grease zerks on the suspension (anywhere except the ball joints, prop shaft, and u-joints), not even holes for any. So I’m replacing the shafts and drilling holes for grease zerks.
 

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Smart to add the zerks I also did this on my 800, added zerks that is.

So another tactic I've used in the past is put a nut on the bolt. Turn the nut all the way up the bolt, install the bolt a decent amount of threads, then tighten down the nut to lock the bushing rod in place, remove the opposite side bolt, loosen the nut, and the bolt and nut should come out freely.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah, I ended up doing exactly that (nut thing). It wasn’t enough to get the other side out alone, but it gave the vice grips enough to bite into (along with the shaft) that I eventually got it out.
 

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Nice!!!
 

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Those short bolts and the threaded pivot tube can be a PITA sometimes. They can also be very dangerous as one of the bolts will sometimes work loose and fall out letting the arm drop out. I've seen several do this and one or two at speed almost causing a serious accident. It also will usually mangle the axle and sometimes the arm, strut and other parts.
Long ago I modified my 2006 800 to use the long single control arm bolt and non-threaded pivot tube as used on newer machines and RZR's. (#20, 21, 26 and 29 in the first pic)
Part numbers bolt:7519065 nylok nut: 7542439 washers:7556153

Its much safer and far easier to work on. The bushings are still the same ones/same size. All you do is order the new long bolt and pivot tube. They will work with no modification at all for the rear. To install the long bolts and pivots in the front only requires you cut a small relief notch with a Dremel in the front lower tips of the front brush guard (#13 in second pic) to allow the long bolts clearance to go through the arms.
After the modification you no longer have to fight with those short bolts and spinning tube and you don't have to worry about the arm falling off while running down the trail or road at speed.
 

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Yup polman I've had it happen and seen it happen. Fortunately in both cases speed was slow so in northern case was there any serious damage.
 

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I don't see the part number for the non-threaded pivot tube. Do you know it off-hand?
Oops... I forgot it. Part number 5137562
I'm looking at the rear suspension for a 2011 Sportsman 800 which is what I used.
When doing the mod on mine several years ago I checked and double checked to make sure the parts were compatible in size etc.
 

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Thank you
You're very welcome OP.
I see you're adding some grease fittings too. I also added grease fittings to all the pivot points on mine while I had it apart.
IIRC, that machine now has something like 22 or 23 fittings including greaseable u-joints and ball joints. The old style greaseable ball joints are hard to find nowdays. There's 12 on the rear suspension alone and that doesn't even include the sway bar since I removed that dead weight long ago. Just make sure to carefully orient the location of the fittings for the rear bearing carriers if you add them so its easy to get on them when its all put together. Those alone will save you a lot of grief if kept greased at all times. Replacing those rear carrier bushings and worn out carriers gets expensive over time.
I even added a fitting to the top steering post bushing. It already has a hole right next to the ECM on the front bulkhead and the bushings have grease channels. You can simply spread the wires back out of the way and a small straight fitting will screw right in.
If kept religiously greased, the effort required to add the fittings to all pivot points will pay off in savings on bushings and work and keep your machine much tighter for WAY longer. My old 800 now has around 20,000+ miles on it. I just rebuilt the engine and got it back in the frame so it'll probably be staying in my collection for the foreseeable future. :wink
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I’m already prepping for operation zerk. The back end is all together, so I’m taking a silver sharpie and putting dots where all of the grease zerks will go. If I can get to it with a sharpie while everything is assembled, I’ll be able to get to it with a grease gun hose.
 
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