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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys first post here, and first quad ive ever owned so please take it easy on me. I picked up a used 2020 sportsman 1000 xp last week. Got new wheels and tires today and figured I would grease the wheel bearings while I was switching everything over. Things were going pretty well until I got to the last hub, really had to force it out. Once it came out I realized the bearing seal was seized onto the hub.

First question, maybe obvious, are these bearings not sealed? I think I know the answer as while I was pumping grease into a few others the outer seals were pushing out, and I re-seated them before putting everything back together.

2nd question, if my assumption above is correct, would anyone be able to point me to a part number for a replacement? I have tried numerous methods to get this piece off but it's pretty damaged now and I will probably just cut it off with a dremel.

Pics attached below for reference to what part I'm looking for.

Thanks in advance to anyone who responds.
 

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2008 800 ho efi, 2019 850 SP premium
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

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Cut an deep "X" shape into the stuck bearing race with a cut-off wheel on an air grinder or a Dremel or something similar. Don't cull all the way through and into the hub. Once you have a deep "X" cut in the race, get a chisel and a hammer. Put the chisel on one of the "X" grooves and hammer it hard a couple of times (or more). That should crack the race and you will be able to remove it. Been there and done that more than once. Be careful to not damage the hub. Grease the hub shaft and the inner race of the new bearing to help prevent a reoccurrence. It may still happen again but at least you're giving yourself a better fighting chance against it.

**Some may say to heat up the race but that hardly works on these. Cutting an "X" and breaking it with a chisel works every time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Cut an deep "X" shape into the stuck bearing race with a cut-off wheel on an air grinder or a Dremel or something similar. Don't cull all the way through and into the hub. Once you have a deep "X" cut in the race, get a chisel and a hammer. Put the chisel on one of the "X" grooves and hammer it hard a couple of times (or more). That should crack the race and you will be able to remove it. Been there and done that more than once. Be careful to not damage the hub. Grease the hub shaft and the inner race of the new bearing to help prevent a reoccurrence. It may still happen again but at least you're giving yourself a better fighting chance against it.

**Some may say to heat up the race but that hardly works on these. Cutting an "X" and breaking it with a chisel works every time.
Thanks, this worked perfectly. New bearing is ready to go in just waiting on its arrival.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
New bearing is in. I noticed as I was putting the hub back in, that it needed some convincing to seat properly. Not worried about it at the moment as everything is greased, but I have a feeling if I need to remove it again I will be in the same situation (hub pulling the race off). Might end up getting a new hub if that ends up being the case. Time will tell. Thanks again for everyone who replied.
 

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New bearing is in. I noticed as I was putting the hub back in, that it needed some convincing to seat properly. Not worried about it at the moment as everything is greased, but I have a feeling if I need to remove it again I will be in the same situation (hub pulling the race off). Might end up getting a new hub if that ends up being the case. Time will tell. Thanks again for everyone who replied.
Having to tap the hub with a mallet or a hammer and a piece of wood, etc. into the bearing during installation isn’t uncommon. Sometimes you get the hub nice and straight to the bearing and it assembles by hand and other times it takes a little persuasion. That’s also not a direct sign you will have the same issue you already had if you need to remove the hub in the future. You’re good to go - send it!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
It's pretty common for the inner race to come out with the hub. Doesn't hurt anything as long as you get it off the hub without damaging it.

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Awesome thanks. I think I just panicked a bit since it's a new machine (to me). I grew up around quads but always preferred 2 wheels. I sold a 2019 super duke to fund this machine. Im anal about maintenance. If it happens again I'll just hand pack grease in there and run it til it gives me issues.
 

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If my inner race pops out, I'm replacing the bearing. If you choose to reassemble as is then to need to pick the dirt out of the bearing first. As soon as the race pops out, dirt falls in.

Not saying there's anything wrong with putting everything back as is.
 

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Many times the full extension of the shock, especially on newer machines with tight axles, binds the hub/axle against the inner bearing making the hub hard to remove and install. Removing the lower shock bolt and rotating the shock up out of the way so the arms/axle assembly can be raised and propped on a block in a more straight-line orientation while working on it makes it much easier to remove and install the hub with no need to force it or risk dislodging the bearing races. This also ensures that the axle is fully seated in the bearing during assembly and that the castle nut has the correct torque since it isn't in a bind. Once installed simply lower the arm assembly and reinstall the shock bolt.
It is a minor extra step in the process and I've found over the years that it can actually make things much quicker and easier and will often save you the grief of a bearing race popping out as the OP experienced. Just my $.02
 

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Many times the full extension of the shock, especially on newer machines with tight axles, binds the hub/axle against the inner bearing making the hub hard to remove and install. Removing the lower shock bolt and rotating the shock up out of the way so the arms/axle assembly can be raised and propped on a block in a more straight-line orientation while working on it makes it much easier to remove and install the hub with no need to force it or risk dislodging the bearing races. This also ensures that the axle is fully seated in the bearing during assembly and that the castle nut has the correct torque since it isn't in a bind. Once installed simply lower the arm assembly and reinstall the shock bolt.
It is a minor extra step in the process and I've found over the years that it can actually make things much quicker and easier and will often save you the grief of a bearing race popping out as the OP experienced. Just my $.02
Hell of a good idea right there!
 
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