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angle drive,, demand drive,,arcane polaris names for common mechanical components why? why not front drive gearbox,,, rear drive gearbox etc ,,, new GF has 4x4 ranger series 11 and trying to match owner manual maintainance recomendations to whats in polaris dealer ???? mannnnnn y'kno
the # on the fluids do not match # in manual or component descriptions in
Polaris fluid part numbers have changed over the years, so a manual for an older model like that will have an old part number. If the dealer punches in that number, they'll come up with the number it superceeded to. That ranger should take PS4 in the engine, AGL in the trans, Angle Drive in front and rear diffs, and Demand Drive in the front hubs.



In addition to checking lug nuts when changing the oil, it's also a good idea to check all the bolts that hold moving components, such as the a-arms, ball joints, tie rods, etc.
 

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first; thank you for reply

yeh,,, as i found out @ the dealer ,,, but only after arguing with the parts person and showing them the manual,,, asking service about wtf arcane polaris names for components and whether the gear-case/hubs are the same thing in the front diff, or hub and diff are separate entities, NONE of which is clear in the manual,,: F**k,, not even vague .
i wrote operations and maintenance manuals in a new pulp mill,, + the process machinery came from varied sources ,offshore and domestic, it was my job to condense technical data into "comprehensible" comprehensive documents for operations personel. Even after translation from country of origin, most of the tech reference i received was more ""comprehensible and comprehensive"" than the 'merde' (written by english speakers for english speakers) polaris ships with their product!!!
i can figure it out stuff once i get apart but i am 100 mile from nearest dealer and makin a run into city for "parts" ie. oil.... grrrr
;again thanks
 

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first; thank you for reply

yeh,,, as i found out @ the dealer ,,, but only after arguing with the parts person and showing them the manual,,, asking service about wtf arcane Polaris names for components and whether the gear-case/hubs are the same thing in the front diff, or hub and diff are separate entities, NONE of which is clear in the manual,,: F**k,, not even vague .
i wrote operations and maintenance manuals in a new pulp mill,, + the process machinery came from varied sources ,offshore and domestic, it was my job to condense technical data into "comprehensible" comprehensive documents for operations personnel. Even after translation from country of origin, most of the tech reference i received was more ""comprehensible and comprehensive"" than the 'merde' (written by English speakers for English speakers) Polaris ships with their product!!!
i can figure it out stuff once i get apart but i am 100 mile from nearest dealer and making a run into city for "parts" ie. oil.... grrrr
;again thanks
I'm going through the same tedious process right now. That fluid guide isn't that great since it doesn't even list the hub fluid for my 2002 Magnum 325 4x4. It lists Angle fluid for front and rear and then lists Front Drive fluid ....for the front. Is it the diffs or hubs it's talking about? I don't know. Not to mention I called different Polaris dealerships and they're telling me different things. Why does it have to be so confusing. I'm sure it's easy once you do it once but figuring it out the first time is enraging. That's enough of my rant.

If anyone knows which fluid goes where for my 2002 Magnum 325 4x4 please post here. So far I have:

Hubs: Demand Drive
Front Diff: Demand Drive
Rear Diff: Angle Drive

Is this correct for fluids? For the diffs does it work like a car where you just fill it up until it pours out the fill plug? And the hubs are the 4/8 O'clock deal?
 

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You've almost got it right. Since your awd clutches are in the hubs, then you need angle drive in the front diff, and demand drive in the hubs.

I can't remember if your model actually has a rear diff, or if it's all in one unit. Polaris went back and forth on different models with that. If you do have a separate gearcase and rear diff, then agl in the gearcase and angle drive in the diff. If it's all one piece, then one quart of agl is all you need.
 

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Excuse my ignorance but is "park" the same as "neutral" in reference to clutch action? I ask because I read your point about not letting the machine idle for very long in gear.
Trying to preserve belt life.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Excuse my ignorance but is "park" the same as "neutral" in reference to clutch action? I ask because I read your point about not letting the machine idle for very long in gear.
Trying to preserve belt life.
Great question. I cant answer that with certainty yet. I'll try to find an answer
 

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EDIT*

CHASSIS LUBE On every machine, there are various grease zerks hidden around each machine. Where and how many can vary a lot by model and year, but look around all parts that move or have bushings. An all season all purpose grease will be fine. On each zerk, you want to push enough fresh grease in that it starts to push the old grease out of the bushing. Then you know it is full, and it constantly cycles the old grease out. Polaris for a while went to sealed bushings because of consumer complaint that other manufactures were doing it, and it was more convient. The problem, the bushings would eventually wear and need to be replaced. Polaris is back to mostly unsealed bushings. Places to check include the steering neck, up near the handle bars, usually between the body and headlight pod. All a-arms, both where they are bolted to the frame, and also out near the wheels where the a-arms attach to the strut. Also, on machines that have a prop shaft going to the rear gearbox, there is actually grease zerk on that shaft. You may need to put the machine in neutral and roll it front or back until the shaft spins around and the zerk comes up on top so you can get to it. This should be done every time you change your oil


Thanks for a great post. One question, my manual says special Polaris U joint lube should be used for the prop shaft. Whats your opinion on that?

Jonas
 

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Discussion Starter #29
EDIT*

CHASSIS LUBE On every machine, there are various grease zerks hidden around each machine. Where and how many can vary a lot by model and year, but look around all parts that move or have bushings. An all season all purpose grease will be fine. On each zerk, you want to push enough fresh grease in that it starts to push the old grease out of the bushing. Then you know it is full, and it constantly cycles the old grease out. Polaris for a while went to sealed bushings because of consumer complaint that other manufactures were doing it, and it was more convient. The problem, the bushings would eventually wear and need to be replaced. Polaris is back to mostly unsealed bushings. Places to check include the steering neck, up near the handle bars, usually between the body and headlight pod. All a-arms, both where they are bolted to the frame, and also out near the wheels where the a-arms attach to the strut. Also, on machines that have a prop shaft going to the rear gearbox, there is actually grease zerk on that shaft. You may need to put the machine in neutral and roll it front or back until the shaft spins around and the zerk comes up on top so you can get to it. This should be done every time you change your oil


Thanks for a great post. One question, my manual says special Polaris U joint lube should be used for the prop shaft. Whats your opinion on that?

Jonas


That would be best.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
It's better than nothing.

As far as I can tell, the U-joint grease has an additive Molybdenum. A quick google search says this is a common additive in u-joint grease that has superior friction reducing ability.

What I got out of it was that with the u-joint constantly spinning and under tension, this additive in the u-joint grease causes it to lubricate better, longer.

Of course Polaris is going to say only use the u-joint grease to protect themselves.

I *think* you would be fine as long as you do it regularly.

Most people never ever even lube it anyway. So by using the all season grease, you are ahead of the curve. And most people that do, probably are just using all season grease, so I think you'll be fine from what I read.
 

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Does anyone know how many grease zerks are on a sportsman?? (I have a 2012 400HO). I am going to pick a gun up and keep on top of the scheduled maintenance...I would think it cant hurt, especially if doing a lot of stream crossings, etc??
 

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i believe you have 5, 1 on each a arm and 1 on the yoke on the drive train.
 

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and it doesn't hurt to grease after any ride that has water involved.
 

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I use green grease on all my zerks...after every few rides...quick and easy to do and well worth it..especially if you are in water at all
 
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