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Hello Everybody
I have been rebuilding a 1999 polaris 500 magnum and I will start by saying I purchased this atv really cheap. It runs and drives. I am fixing a few things on it and a few other things I found odd and am trying to correct it back to factory.
The brown wire that comes from the stator I cannot seem to find a home as of right now its just hanging out like it pulled loose from somewhere and the other thing is he hardwired the fan and im trying to figure out where the original wires were and put the fan switch back to working order. Any help with these thing will be greatly appreciated. I will get pictures up asap
 

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The brown wire from the stator is a ground wire - find a convenient ground and connect it

Here's the fan wiring - red/wht is 12v+ when the key and handlebar switch are on and brown is ground
137263
 

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Ok next question I thaught it might be a ground and I connected it and the atv misfired like crazy I removed it and it starts and runs but won’t shut off at the key
 

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OK - you have an ignition problem - to figure out what is wrong, find the CDI unit, disconnect the black wire and connect the brown wire to ground - it should start and run, but you won't be able to shut it off until the black wire is reconnected.

Start trouble shooting by testing the stator - none of the wires to the stator should have continuity to ground except the brown wire. If there is continuity to ground on any of the other wires, the stator need to be replaced.
 

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Ok I will do that tomarrow. Also Does it matter if I just replaced the cdi box. It was just a weird coincidence because I installed the cdi box and I was able to start it and turn it off with the switch no problem . Does the black wire from the cdi box go to the switch ? Also the switch was new when I bought the atv and the switch and the key switch would not kill the atv. Im sorry I am just trying to provide as much detail as possible.
 

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It's OK - you are doing fine - electrical is a pain for most - I have a degree in electronics and have worked on motorcycles and ATV's for over 30 years.

The black wire on the CDI goes to the key switch, handlebar kill switch throttle lever safety switch and the rev limiter - the black wire is the kill wire - with the engine running, touch the black wire to ground and the engine will die
 

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I am an automotive mechanic by trade small engines are not my cup of tea but I am always up for learning . It definitely makes sense what your saying the wiring on this thing has been hacked up a good so would it be a good idea to check for a bad ground while I am doing the test for the stator ? thanks again for the information too !
 

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I have a degree in electronics; my history -

I grew up on a farm - I have a brother 6 years older - dad wanted his kids to be better than farmers, so he sent us to college - my brother earned a degree as a journeyman auto mechanic - he taught me mechanics - I thought I wanted to be a mechanic too and announced that I was going to attend the same college my brother did - my brother told me he had taught me all there was to being a mechanic and urged me to go to different school, learn something else and teach it to him (prior to graduating High School in 1969, I worked part time in a Kawasaki shop from 1967 to 69) - while attending college (1969 to 71) I worked part time in a Yamaha shop - I dropped out college in the early summer of 1971 to join the Army (it was the height of the Vietnam War and my birth date made me #25 in the first draft lottery) - by joining, I got to select the branch of the military I got into (I joined an Armor Division as there was no armor units in Vietnam) - upon completion of training I was assigned to the National Guard - I then contacted the school and enrolled in a class that was at the point where I had dropped out - upon graduation from college early 1972, I couldn't find a job in electronics, so I accidentally got a job in a Kawasaki shop while seeking a job in electronics - in Dec. of 1973 I got into General Electric's High Current Lab in Bloomington, IL - was laid off in Sept. 75, worked at a local Ace Hardware store from Sept. 75 to Feb. 77 - managed a Montgomery Ward Store Mar. 77 to May 81.

I left Montgomery Ward because the Local Honda/Kawasaki dealership owner was going to retire and we had made a deal for me to take over the dealership - between May and Dec. of 81 I was unemployed waiting on Honda and Kawasaki to approve the transfer - in Dec. the transfer was denied as both Honda and Kawasaki determined the dealers in neighboring communities would benefit from the closing of the location.

In Aug. 81, I began operation of an independent motorcycle repair shop in anticipation of adding a Honda and Kawasaki franchise to the venture. When the deal fell through, I found that I did not have enough business to sustain the fledgling business. I got a part time job as a maintenance man in a local sheet metal roll form manufacturing plant and continued to work on motorcycles after my shift at the plant. I left the plant in 2006 and continue to operate the repair shop. During the period between 1982 and 2006 my shop grew, moved into a larger building and eventually I purchased a property that had previously been a body shop which gained me a larger shop building and a warehouse building for storage.

I am now selective on what I work on - no Goldwings or other large touring bikes, no snowmobiles, jet skis or side by sides. At the same time I am an authorized warranty repair for BMS, TaoTao, Roketa, MotoVox, Monster Moto, Baja, Coleman, Coolster, American Landmaster, Yard Sport, Yerf Dog and various other Chinese brands including Razor electric scooters.

I started out working on farm machinery, learned how to work on engines with my brother, helped build a 1957 Ford Fairlane 312 Y block drag race car, fixed a 47 Harley and rode it until I got a drivers license, took two junk Zundapp KS601's, built one running bike and rode it until I started working in the Kawasaki shop when I bought my first NEW motorcycle - a 1967 Kawasaki A7 Avenger (350cc twin cylinder rotary valve two stroke - very similar to the Bridgestone GTR 350) - I wrecked it and got a 1968 Kawasaki A7SS (street scrambler version of the A7 - had high pips, bash pan, bobbed fenders and a crossbar on the handlebars). My last new motorcycle was a 2004 Honda CRF250X. I have worked on chain saws, lawn mowers, all variations of single and multi-cylinder motorcycles and ATV's, car and truck engines from model A flat head Fords to overhead cam V-8's and Caterpillar diesel engines (never worked on an airplane engine, but did assist with a Texaco pumping station straight 8 diesel) - my experience is quite varied - welder, carpenter, plumber, computer programmer, electronics designer, mechanic, mechanical engineer, business manager, business owner, president of a charitable corporation, father, grandfather and some things that I no longer remember.

Testing for ground is #1 - 90% of electrical problems are connections and 90% of connection problems are grounding problems.

Here is something to dwell on - the ATV you have has two separate electrical systems - AC ignition and DC power - they operate 100% separately from each other. The DC power runs the lights and electric starter - the ignition is pointless magneto. The key switch makes two connections - in the off position it connects black to brown to kill the engine - in the on position it connects red to red/blk to supply battery power to the lights and electric starter - just unplugging the ignition switch will allow the engine to be started with the recoil and it can be shut off with the handlebar switch. The only connection between the ignition and the battery is the stator - the stator has windings to generate AC to charge the battery and separate windings to excite the CDI - an AC signal (voltage only - no amperage) is taken from the battery charge winding and used by the speedometer to determine engine speed to limit RPM when in reverse. Other than that, there is no connection between the DC side and the AC side.
 

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Wow what a picture perfect answer my friend and awesome story your a very brilliant man and the experience is awesome too . With your explanation helps me a lot with the diagnostic process when I get home today I’ll hook up the brown wire from the stator to a good ground and disconnect the black wire and see what she does I’m hopeing it’s the switch lol something easy for once but the key didn’t kill it and the handlebar switch didn’t kill it so I’m doubtful at this point lol but we will see it all worked when I put the cdi box in and even with the brown wire off it started ran and died with key switch the only reason I moved wires is because nothing was held down so I was putting everything in it’s factory locations so I could install my winch conductor ...lol all a process
 

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The brown wire from the stator is nothing more than a ground wire - technically it should not be needed as the engine is grounded to the frame and the stator is bolted to the engine - it is a redundant ground for the ignition if the frame ground to the engine is lost. Since the engine is anchored to the frame by rubber cushions, has a belt drive and the carb is connected by a rubber holder, the engine need a grounding wire so the starter motor will work. Since the coil is attached to the frame and the spark plug is in the engine, the ignition needs a ground for a complete circuit. If the main engine ground is lost due to breakage or continuity (corrosion) issues, the redundant ground provides a secondary path for the spark. If the main ground is lost and the redundant ground is good, the starter motor will not work, but it can be starter with the recoil starter. BTW, if the main engine ground wire looses connection or fails completely, using the electric start will cause the redundant ground to carry the full starter motor current causing the stator ground wire to melt.

I will do my best to help you figure this out as long as you can give me accurate and detailed observations.

Troubleshooting involves a keen sense of observation.
 
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