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Well after only running about 10 hours on the Mobil1 5W50 i have switched back to Mobil1 0W40. I have been keeping close eye on the dipstick level and it probably burnt up about a 1/5th of a quart. With the 0w40 at 50 hours i was Spot on and no loss what so ever!

0W40 from here on out!!!!

Matt


Sent from West 'by-God' Virginia!!!
 

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Mobil 1 0w40 can't go wrong. Do not use 5w in cold weather...just adding wear at start up and you can use 0w in the summer....
 

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Mobil 1 0w40 can't go wrong. Do not use 5w in cold weather...just adding wear at start up and you can use 0w in the summer....
Does polaris call for a 0W 50 during the winter? The cold pour point between the two is the same, but the difference is that the 5W offers more protection.
 

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Well after only running about 10 hours on the Mobil1 5W50 i have switched back to Mobil1 0W40. I have been keeping close eye on the dipstick level and it probably burnt up about a 1/5th of a quart. With the 0w40 at 50 hours i was Spot on and no loss what so ever!

0W40 from here on out!!!!

Matt


Sent from West 'by-God' Virginia!!!
Interesting, I have Castrol 5W-50 ready to go in mine. I'll have to keep a close eye on it. If I have the same problem I might have to go back to the Amsoil 0W-40. Or maybe Mobil 1 0W-40 now that Walmart carries it in 5 quart jugs for $25.

Sent from my SPH-D710 using Tapatalk 2
 

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Mobil 1 0w40 can't go wrong. Do not use 5w in cold weather...just adding wear at start up and you can use 0w in the summer....
Does polaris call for a 0W 50 during the winter? The cold pour point between the two is the same, but the difference is that the 5W offers more protection.
Why do you keep posting misinformation? I've posted in numerous threads with links supporting your logic is not right.

There is NO way 5w pour rate is the same as 0w. If it were, it would be CALLED 0w. You don't just slap a 0w and say its the same unless your a Chinese knock-off company.

And stop focusing on "pourability" temperatures to justify using 5w in below freezing temps. Last I checked, hardly anyone is trying to pour oil into their machine in below freezing temps. However, they are starting and running the machine below freezing and that "pumpable" temp is a lot higher (warmer) then the pourable temp, which is extremely important when cold starting ANY motor. The oil pump can not magically pump up enough thick oil to the proper PSI. There is a reason that vehicles in the cold have oil pan heaters, especially diesels since they have so much oil to keep thinned in the winter.
 

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Mobil 1 0w40 can't go wrong. Do not use 5w in cold weather...just adding wear at start up and you can use 0w in the summer....
Does polaris call for a 0W 50 during the winter? The cold pour point between the two is the same, but the difference is that the 5W offers more protection.
Why do you keep posting misinformation? I've posted in numerous threads with links supporting your logic is not right.

There is NO way 5w pour rate is the same as 0w. If it were, it would be CALLED 0w. You don't just slap a 0w and say its the same unless your a Chinese knock-off company.

And stop focusing on "pourability" temperatures to justify using 5w in below freezing temps. Last I checked, hardly anyone is trying to pour oil into their machine in below freezing temps. However, they are starting and running the machine below freezing and that "pumpable" temp is a lot higher (warmer) then the pourable temp, which is extremely important when cold starting ANY motor. The oil pump can not magically pump up enough thick oil to the proper PSI. There is a reason that vehicles in the cold have oil pan heaters, especially diesels since they have so much oil to keep thinned in the winter.
Lets see, you live in toasty warm Nevada, so the chances of you checking your oil in your vehicle which is parked outside on a -50 day, taking a litre from your uninsulated/unheated garage and topping it up are. ..ZERO!! Post all the links you want. The mild difference in pour points at those temps will be marginal.


There is not a vehicle on the road, or off road that specs a 0W oil. Even up in the freezing north, they do not run that thin. Oil pumps do not lose their prime, dry starts are non existent, and if they do lose their prime, you have bigger problems.

M1 0W50 Pour point -54F

http://www.mobil.com/USA-English/Lubes/PDS/GLUSENPVLMOMobil_1_Racing_Oils.aspx

Red Line 5W50 - Pour point -49F
http://www.redlineoil.com/product.aspx?product=11604

Red Line 0W40 Pour point - 60F

http://www.redlineoil.com/product.aspx?pid=126&pcid=21


Even with the 5 Degree difference, youre not going to notice the mild difference in starting. At -60F, your vehicle will be plugged in anyway. But at -49, block heater may not be needed.

My 400 started fine in the middle of a -30 cold snap with Polaris oil in it.

People do actually exist and live their lives at these temps, which includes maintaining our vehicles. You may want to try imagining a little harder.

Oil pan heaters are a total crock of crap. They do not work an anything with a cast iron oil pan. Block heaters are the only legit way of warming something up before starting. And for those in the Arctic circle, draining the oil and taking it inside is still common, if there is not a heated shop to park in. The Prairie Provinces have plug stations at parking lots pretty well everywhere, because it is sl cold you need your block heater to keep the antifreeze and the block warm.
 

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Lets see, you live in toasty warm Nevada, so the chances of you checking your oil in your vehicle which is parked outside on a -50 day, taking a litre from your uninsulated/unheated garage and topping it up are. ..ZERO!! Post all the links you want. A 5W oil pours just the same as a 0W but gives better protection.


There is not a vehicle on the road, or off road that specs a 0W oil. Even up in the freezing north, they do not run that thin. Oil pumps do not lose their prime, dry starts are non existant, and if they do lose their prime, you have bigger problems.

My 400 started fine in the middle of a -30 cold snap with Polaris oil in it.
1) you're right, I live in toasty warm Nevada, guess my chances of taking my quad to the below freezing snow covered mountains that are 30 mins away are ZERO as well....

2) I would venture a guess to say that my experience while deployed in mountains in below freezing temps would a be ZERO in your eyes too...

3) I have forgotten the old rule that garage mechanic beats scientific studies all day, thank you for reminding me. Our sensor data collection means nothing to you guys.

4) Have you heard of a company called "Toyota" by chance? If so you'd know that they IN FACT recommend 0w20 in their owners manuals from anything like Camry's to their higher line-up. Oh, that goes for their Lexus brand, and Subaru to boot too! Guess all the pics of subbies that are up in the mountains are photoshopped cause God forbid they'd blow the block on that 0w20 stuff going up there.

5) Who said the oil pumps lose their prime? Not me. I SAID they can not pump the oil to proper PSI limits as dictated by motor manufacture requirements when the wrong weight (IE your 5w) is used in a temperature below the "pump able" temp. Since very very few manufactures release that number, its hard to judge which oil is indeed better over the other. The number game they play is who's can pour at the coldest point. Pouring temp has almost 0 factor in the oil pumps ability to move it to the top end at the minimum PSI needed. It would stand to reason that the lower the pour temp the lower the pump temp will be, but that can not be verified without the manufacture's number.
 

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I tend to use the manufacturers products especially in my Deere polaris n jeep. I don't even look at the price of the parts when I go to the dealer cause I know I'm getting hard. But with this oil talk I'm considering going after market with the filter and oil. in general I use after market oil n filter's. So does any one know the cross reference for the oil filters to say fram?
 

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Oh I see you've finally added some links for once :)

We can continue this argument all day long in every oil thread, but my statement still stands from the last one, use what you want to use cause I don't care, its your money for your machine. I'm here to help people and provide information for them to use at their leisure if they care about their equipment like I do. Stop spreading misinformation that the 2 are the same...they are not. NO oil spec in the industry agrees with your logic, nor do oil studies.
 

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I tend to use the manufacturers products especially in my Deere polaris n jeep. I don't even look at the price of the parts when I go to the dealer cause I know I'm getting hard. But with this oil talk I'm considering going after market with the filter and oil. in general I use after market oil n filter's. So does any one know the cross reference for the oil filters to say fram?
I don't recall the wix number off hand, but there are a lot of threads here with the part number to wix. I'd steer clear of Fram, there are way better aftermarket filters out there.
 

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OK, while we argue about the difference between 0W and 5W, there are many, many people that run plain old conventional 10W-40, 15W-40 in their ATVs, or 20W-50, even in the winter and they never have any problems.

There is not a vehicle on the road, or off road that specs a 0W oil.
Actually, there are quite a few cars on the road these days that spec 0W. Most new Hondas, Toyotas, and Mazdas spec 0W-20 just to name a few.
 

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Oh I see you've finally added some links for once :)

We can continue this argument all day long in every oil thread, but my statement still stands from the last one, use what you want to use cause I don't care, its your money for your machine. I'm here to help people and provide information for them to use at their leisure if they care about their equipment like I do. Stop spreading misinformation that the 2 are the same...they are not. NO oil spec in the industry agrees with your logic, nor do oil studies.
The last time I checked, Toyota, Subaru did not have any Cold Weather Development centres In Northern Ontario, do they?? GM has one up in Kapuskasing where they do all kinds of testing, oil included. Do you see them with specs lower than 5W30?? No. GM shares a lot of their Data with Petro Canada. Petro was one of the companies that developed Dexron VI.

My data also come from many friends up north that take care of their vehicles too, many are heavy equipment mechanics, and have never had an oil related failure too. Guess what, they run what is called for, not what people on the internet tell them they should be running.
 

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OK, while we argue about the difference between 0W and 5W, there are many, many people that run plain old conventional 10W-40, 15W-40 in their ATVs, or 20W-50, even in the winter and they never have any problems.
So because other people don't follow or exceed manufacture recommendations, everyone is suppose to follow them cause "they never have any problems."?

you've got to be kidding...
 

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OK, while we argue about the difference between 0W and 5W, there are many, many people that run plain old conventional 10W-40, 15W-40 in their ATVs, or 20W-50, even in the winter and they never have any problems.

There is not a vehicle on the road, or off road that specs a 0W oil.
Actually, there are quite a few cars on the road these days that spec 0W. Most new Hondas, Toyotas, and Mazdas spec 0W-20 just to name a few.
CAFE standards are the biggest reason they spec that low a grade of oil, no other reason for it.

Exactly. People run heavier and have not had issues.
 

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I tend to use the manufacturers products especially in my Deere polaris n jeep. I don't even look at the price of the parts when I go to the dealer cause I know I'm getting hard. But with this oil talk I'm considering going after market with the filter and oil. in general I use after market oil n filter's. So does any one know the cross reference for the oil filters to say fram?
I don't recall the wix number off hand, but there are a lot of threads here with the part number to wix. I'd steer clear of Fram, there are way better aftermarket filters out there.
Wix part number is 51358, or Napa Gold 1358. (same filter) Definitely stay away from the regular Fram filters, but the Fram Ultra is an excellent filter. I just picked up some Royal Purple filters on ebay for $8 each.

Here's a cross reference chart, go down to section number 5 for a complete list of filters that will work.

Motorcycle Oil Filter Cross Reference
 

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Wix part number is 51358, or Napa Gold 1358. (same filter) Definitely stay away from the regular Fram filters, but the Fram Ultra is an excellent filter. I just picked up some Royal Purple filters on ebay for $8 each.

Here's a cross reference chart, go down to section number 5 for a complete list of filters that will work.

Motorcycle Oil Filter Cross Reference
They finally decided to improve their quality??
 

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Oh I see you've finally added some links for once :)

We can continue this argument all day long in every oil thread, but my statement still stands from the last one, use what you want to use cause I don't care, its your money for your machine. I'm here to help people and provide information for them to use at their leisure if they care about their equipment like I do. Stop spreading misinformation that the 2 are the same...they are not. NO oil spec in the industry agrees with your logic, nor do oil studies.
The last time I checked, Toyota, Subaru did not have any Cold Weather Development centres In Northern Ontario, do they?? GM has one up in Kapuskasing where they do all kinds of testing, oil included. Do you see them with specs lower than 5W30?? No.

My data also come from many friends up north that take care of their vehicles too, many are heavy equipment mechanics, and have never had an oil related failure too. Guess what, they run what is called for, not what people on the internet tell them they should be running.
Nope they don't have one!

TOYOTA CANADA: TOYOTA.CA LANGUAGE

Other operations in North America

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Canada_Inc.

... they've had that center since 1998, but who's counting.

And the first vehicle to make it to the North Pole was a Toyota, haven't seen GM do that yet...

Your data comes from friends, mine comes from sensors and studies. In the end you posting in here and me is the EXACT same. Its 2 dudes no one has met posting crap about oil weights and pressure. One spouts off claims that 2 weights are the same the other says no and shows proof. Then the first guy links oil pour temps to justify his misunderstanding and actually post information that confirms what second guy has been saying all along. The 2 are not the same. Thank you for playing :)
 
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