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Discussion Starter #1
Wondering if someone could clarify, I have a 2007 sportsman 800, I took apart one of the front strut assemblies and the shock rod pushes in easy and comes back out on it’s own very slowly but it won’t come back out all the way, it has resistance when I pull it out but not when I push it in, is this normal or should it have resistance when pushing in as well? Just wondering if they need replacing, not sure what they are like new.
 

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like latebird said! as long as there is resistance in both directions, no leaks, or physical signs of damage to the rod call it good.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
like latebird said! as long as there is resistance in both directions, no leaks, or physical signs of damage to the rod call it good.
That’s just it though, there is very little to no resistance going in(compression)but lots pulling out(extension), a normal shock has resistance both ways, mine does not, but when I research for these, some say they should have no resistance pushing in and some say they should have resistance, just trying to clear this up.
 

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That’s just it though, there is very little to no resistance going in(compression)but lots pulling out(extension), a normal shock has resistance both ways, mine does not, but when I research for these, some say they should have no resistance pushing in and some say they should have resistance, just trying to clear this up.
I am of the ilk that the resistance to compression is low (some but little) as the spring provides the resistance to compression - it's just that 'undampened' spring rebound would launch the vehicle upward and inertia would launch the vehicle off the ground. In use, the shock compresses rapidly and restricts the spring from rebounding violently. What you need to do is get a new shock and compare the action of the old to the new.

On my race bike (CRF250X) Honda provided external adjusters so I could tune the action of the damper to my weight, riding style, terrain conditions, tire pressures and un-sprung weight. Un-sprung weight is the weight of all components not carried by the springs. This includes (on the front) tires, tubes, rims, spokes, rim locks, wheel hubs, wheel bearings, axles, brake rotor, brake caliper, Rotor guard, a portion of the brake line and fluid, the lower fork tubes, the fork springs and some components of the internal damper assembly. On the rear, all the wheel parts, brake caliper, caliper mount (and on my bike the rear brake rotor guard and caliper guard) plus a portion of the brake line, swing arm, lower portion of the shock absorber and shock linkage attachments.

Adjustable shocks are expensive and most quads are limited to adjustment of the spring rate only. In addition to having external adjusters that control the flow of oil through a valve orifice, I can change the weight of the oil in the damper, the amount of oil and or air in the unit and the spring rate and spring preload. An unloaded spring is a spring at rest off the vehicle. If the spring has to be compressed any amount to install either the shock or the spring, the spring is preloaded. You may be able to adjust the preload on a quad's suspension by compressing the spring with an adjustable collar.

Finally there is sag - how much suspension travel is required the support the weight of the vehicle when the rider and normal gear is on board. If the suspension sags more than 10% of the full travel of the suspension when loaded, the springs need to be stiffened up, but it may be a personal preference as to how much sag is acceptable. My bike has 12 inches of travel front and rear - I am 6 ft tall & I weigh 200 lbs - I race off road natural terrain - I set my sag at about 3 inches. My friend who races primarily motocross id 5' 4" & weighs 160 - he sets his sag at 1.25 inches. He needs the extra travel landing from the big jumps - I need the extra plushness to absorb the obstacles I drive over. I stay on the ground and he flies.

Like I said - you need to compare a new cartridge to the old cartridge to determine it's usefulness.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I am of the ilk that the resistance to compression is low (some but little) as the spring provides the resistance to compression - it's just that 'undampened' spring rebound would launch the vehicle upward and inertia would launch the vehicle off the ground. In use, the shock compresses rapidly and restricts the spring from rebounding violently. What you need to do is get a new shock and compare the action of the old to the new.

On my race bike (CRF250X) Honda provided external adjusters so I could tune the action of the damper to my weight, riding style, terrain conditions, tire pressures and un-sprung weight. Un-sprung weight is the weight of all components not carried by the springs. This includes (on the front) tires, tubes, rims, spokes, rim locks, wheel hubs, wheel bearings, axles, brake rotor, brake caliper, Rotor guard, a portion of the brake line and fluid, the lower fork tubes, the fork springs and some components of the internal damper assembly. On the rear, all the wheel parts, brake caliper, caliper mount (and on my bike the rear brake rotor guard and caliper guard) plus a portion of the brake line, swing arm, lower portion of the shock absorber and shock linkage attachments.

Adjustable shocks are expensive and most quads are limited to adjustment of the spring rate only. In addition to having external adjusters that control the flow of oil through a valve orifice, I can change the weight of the oil in the damper, the amount of oil and or air in the unit and the spring rate and spring preload. An unloaded spring is a spring at rest off the vehicle. If the spring has to be compressed any amount to install either the shock or the spring, the spring is preloaded. You may be able to adjust the preload on a quad's suspension by compressing the spring with an adjustable collar.

Finally there is sag - how much suspension travel is required the support the weight of the vehicle when the rider and normal gear is on board. If the suspension sags more than 10% of the full travel of the suspension when loaded, the springs need to be stiffened up, but it may be a personal preference as to how much sag is acceptable. My bike has 12 inches of travel front and rear - I am 6 ft tall & I weigh 200 lbs - I race off road natural terrain - I set my sag at about 3 inches. My friend who races primarily motocross id 5' 4" & weighs 160 - he sets his sag at 1.25 inches. He needs the extra travel landing from the big jumps - I need the extra plushness to absorb the obstacles I drive over. I stay on the ground and he flies.

Like I said - you need to compare a new cartridge to the old cartridge to determine it's usefulness.
Agreed, its not that I noticed it rode any different, (although this winter I took it for a ride and it seemed like the front shocks were frozen as it was really stiff when hit a bump) I just like to keep my machine in the best shape possible, even though I have been hard on it and it’s getting old, so I’ve got it apart checking things over and noticed no compression resistance on the shocks, thought they were maybe shot from all the jumping over the years, hoping someone that has had a brand new one could chime in to confirm one way or the other. Thanks.
 
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