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Discussion Starter #1
Looking at my 2008 500 HO Service Manual it shows a location of my fuel filter being toward the front of the ATV, I did locate it on mine. Reading through some older threads polman500 posted it's kind of a pain in the donkey to get to that fuel filter. I was wondering because I don't know would it be easier to access that filter if the front storage box was removed?

There again I have not looked into that procedure of removing the front storage whether it's a pain in the rear or not to remove it. Also my mileage is 775 miles on the 500 Sportsman odometer, and I believe the recommended service to replace that fuel filter is around 1000 mile interval.

One other question if your EFI ATV has the external metal fuel filter located where I said does, does that also mean it has a in-tank non serviceable fuel filter also?

Tony
 

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Generally yes - also, I have seen EFI machines with 4000 and more miles on them that the inline filter has never been changed.

If your fuel tank is plastic, it won't rust and if you gas up with a plastic fuel can or right out of the pump, chances are there is no dirt in the fuel to filter out.

Just say'in
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Generally yes - also, I have seen EFI machines with 4000 and more miles on them that the inline filter has never been changed.

If your fuel tank is plastic, it won't rust and if you gas up with a plastic fuel can or right out of the pump, chances are there is no dirt in the fuel to filter out.

Just say'in
Ok thanks latebird, I'm taking that yes as there is no in tank non-serviceable fuel filter since mine has the metal external fuel filter. Maybe 1000 mile fuel filter interval is a bit of over kill since you've witnessed 4000 mile no problem fuel filters not being changed out.

Yes I only fuel my ATV's using plastic fuel containers and 99.9% of the time I'll use a fuel conditioner also in the gas because all I can get arounfd here is the 10% added ethanol crap gas.

Tony
 

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There is a filter on the fuel pump, but as far as I know, it is not serviceable or replaceable - what kind of conditioner do you use? We have one station out of 7 that has one pump of 91 octane non ethanol. Prior to that every gas station in out town had ethanol. I used Liquid Performance Ethanol Equalizer - it was a product that I tested and know it works. When it first appeared on the market, the manufacturer had a video on their website - I duplicated their demonstration and found a flaw in their testing. They did all their testing in the lab - I did my testing in the real world. I informed them of my test results and they agreed their 'lab testing' was flawed. They reformulated the product, sent me a pint bottle and a 'test kit'. I retested the product and it worked. I have a test tube with the original sample of ethanol fuel that I had intentionally contaminated with .4% tinted water to get the ethanol to separate from the fuel. The ethanol in the fuel combined with the tinted water and in over 3 years of stationary storage, the fuel appears to be tinted red as the ethanol/water has not separated from the gasoline. The fuel itself may not be any good for use in an engine, but the failure of the water and ethanol to separate from the gasoline is what I wanted to see. It was proof that the product did indeed prevent phase separation.

There may be other products that work as well, but Ethanol Equlizer is one product that I know works. Consequently, it is the only product I use when putting ethanol fuel in my daily drivers, I never use ethanol fuel in any gasoline engine powered device that is not operated daily and avoid it like the plague in my recreational vehicles, stand by generators, pressure washers, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
latebird all I've used is Seafoam and Star Tron Enzyme fuel treatment. I was able to buy the Star Tron at our local Walmart for awhile, but for some reason they stopped handling it. I just know the ethanol fuel is not a good thing and I have at least a 1/2 dozen well established mechanics will verify that the ethanol fuel really sucks for a fuel system. :eek

Actually I got into a pretty good debate with a guy on the internet a couple years ago, he saying there is nothing wrong with our ethanol type fuel, that he's used it that's a whole year old un-treated gas and never had a problem with it in any of his fuel systems. The gas in my area you let go 1 year un-treated and it smells like varnish to me. My belief is it was possibly already treated from his supplier or he was just lying.

The Seafoam and Star Tron may not be the best out there to be using, but so far I've had very good luck with both products,maybe I just got lucky, I don't know, but I've been using both products for years to treat my fuel containers.

Tony
 

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I ran up on information about K100 last year and watched some videos of testing of the product that looked really good. Like latebird, I got a bottle and did some testing of my own. I've got a small jar of 10% alcohol fuel to which water was added to bind with the alcohol sitting on a shelf in my garage. It was treated with K100 about a year ago and I've seen no separation so far.
 

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Tony - there's plenty wrong with ethanol blended fuel, but there's problems with gasoline and pure ethanol too.

Partial oxidation of ethanol can produce harmful acetaldehyde. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has listed acetaldehyde as a Group 1 carcinogen. Acetaldehyde is "one of the most frequently found air toxins with cancer risk greater than one in a million".

Oxidation of ethanol in an internal combustion engine is more complete than in open air, but neither gasoline or ethanol is completely oxidized in an engine using atmospheric air. Introduction of an oxidizing agent is required for complete combustion.

From a memo to the EPA:

MEMORANDUM
SUBJECT: Water Phase Separation in Oxygenated Gasoline - Corrected version of Kevin Krause memo

FROM: David Korotney, Chemical Engineer Fuels Studies and Standards Branch

TO: Susan Willis, Manager Fuels Studies and Standards Group

On May 26, 1995, Kevin Krause finalized a memorandum describing the conditions under which water phase separation will occur in oxygenated gasolines. Recently, several errors were discovered in that memorandum. I have made the necessary corrections, and now resubmit the complete text of Kevin's memo for your review and approval.

Excerpt: "at 60 degrees F, water can be absorbed by a blend of 90% gasoline and 10% ethanol up to a content of 0.5 volume percent before it will phase separate. This means that approximately 3.8 teaspoons of water can be dissolved per gallon of the fuel before the water will begin to phase separate." A chart included in the memo shows that at zero degrees F .3% of water causes phase separation and at -20 the amount of water needed to separate alcohol from the gasoline is about .2%. The entire memo can be accessed here Alcohol Phase Separation.

Each gallon of gasoline contains appx. 12 ounces of ethanol. Therefore, fuel line deicers are not needed or recommended when using ethanol blended fuels. HEET fuel line deicer is sold in 12 ounce bottles to treat 20 gallons of gas. 12 oz in 20 gal (2560 oz in a gallon) is putting .47% ethanol into the fuel. If .47% of ethanol in gasoline will melt ice in the fuel line, how much ice will 10% ethanol melt?

I'm done rambling now - I got to get back to work.

Steve
 
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