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that's not worth the effort, that fuel when burned will leave a shellac in the motor. we had a guy do this to a remanned engine and he destroyed it in 2 hours every piston was covered in black tar. I still talk to that guy every week and this was before ethanol fuel it was 1999. Chrysler 318 in a luhrs.
 

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If you have a car that you only rarely drive or even one you keep in storage for months at a time, you should add fuel stabilizer. If you find the best fuel stabilizer, you must read this on best fuel stabilizer. I hope you will like this.
 

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I was trained and worked in a marina as a mechanic. There they taught us that Seafoam keeps the fuel good and they used in all there engines. Today it goes in all my fuel tanks that are "occasional" use. Ya, It works.
 

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So many different opinions on how to do this..... I've never done anything other than keep the tank full and run my machine occasionally as needed. When I lived in Colorado, I used it to plow my driveway, and when the weather was better, not so much snow, I'd go riding. When the weather was bad, it sat. I just kept the tank full. Now that I'm in Florida (def not going to stay here, moving back to Colorado as soon as I can), with the high humidity, I just keep it in my shop! It's air conditioned and insulated, and I ride it about one a week or so around my property and area......

Now, if you intend to store it for several months without starting it up or anything like that, then your best options are to install a battery tender to maintain the battery, and top it off with fuel! Non-ethanol fuel is preferred, but if the tank is full it's not really going to make that much difference....I haven't seen it....don't make it harder than it really is. A little water in the fuel will get picked up and ran through the engine by the fuel system...unless you have a gallon or so at the bottom of the tank, your machine will never know the difference.......
 

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Discussion Starter #46
So many different opinions on how to do this..... I've never done anything other than keep the tank full and run my machine occasionally as needed. When I lived in Colorado, I used it to plow my driveway, and when the weather was better, not so much snow, I'd go riding. When the weather was bad, it sat. I just kept the tank full. Now that I'm in Florida (def not going to stay here, moving back to Colorado as soon as I can), with the high humidity, I just keep it in my shop! It's air conditioned and insulated, and I ride it about one a week or so around my property and area......

Now, if you intend to store it for several months without starting it up or anything like that, then your best options are to install a battery tender to maintain the battery, and top it off with fuel! Non-ethanol fuel is preferred, but if the tank is full it's not really going to make that much difference....I haven't seen it....don't make it harder than it really is. A little water in the fuel will get picked up and ran through the engine by the fuel system...unless you have a gallon or so at the bottom of the tank, your machine will never know the difference.......
Good answer...keep it simple. Just to clarify: keeping the tank full reduces the amount of space water can build up in, right?

I too keep a Battery Tender on 24/7. I also use on on my emergency back-up generator.

Scott
 

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Good answer...keep it simple. Just to clarify: keeping the tank full reduces the amount of space water can build up in, right?
Keeps air out of the tank...the water comes from moisture in the air....condenses inside the tank and separates to the bottom since it weighs more than the fuel.
 

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Just to clarify. Gasoline fuels are made as an expendable commodity and begin to degrade as soon as they leave the refinery. It cross-links with oxygen so less of that, is better and in the pipelines, they see little to no O2 while in them. This is why people say a full tank is better. Nonetheless, heat makes all chemical reactions go faster and another enemy. Seafoam is a sure shot to make feuls last a long, long time while in tanks and carburetors.
 

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Discussion Starter #50
Just to clarify. Gasoline fuels are made as an expendable commodity and begin to degrade as soon as they leave the refinery. It cross-links with oxygen so less of that, is better and in the pipelines, they see little to no O2 while in them. This is why people say a full tank is better. Nonetheless, heat makes all chemical reactions go faster and another enemy. Seafoam is a sure shot to make feuls last a long, long time while in tanks and carburetors.
does seafoam last longer than stabl?
 

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I've used stabl and then had fuel the system gummed up, then I paid a small engine shop $100 to get it operable again. Not again. Seafoam has been around since the 40's and it works, while the company spends far less on marketing. I get it by the case while its on sale and use it in all our seasonal use engines. I can't tell you how long it might keep a fuel stabilized but I for one, do trust it.
 

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I've used SeaFoam and wasn't really impressed with it either. Didn't make much of a difference...

Now BG44K on the other hand.....that's good stuff right there.....
 

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Yeah, after some testing I've switched to K100 when I do use a stabilizer occasionally. A friend of mine owns a station nearby and now keeps good quality real gas so I don't worry about it much anymore. My machines never sit very long anyway.
 
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