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Discussion Starter #1
I will most likely do it but my friends say "NO"

I have owned over 13 bikes and never replaced any bearing. But we do not mud and go around the mud puddles and water if at all posable. Bikes have all had 6000 to 7000 miles and the Honda had 9984 miles.

My question is just how many grease there bearing and or have had a bearing go bad that need replaced.


Reply from friend:


I really question the need and or value of greasing the bearings. In all the years you have ridden ATV's how many wheel bearings have you replaced? George probably has 15,000 miles on his, has he replaced any wheel bearings?

Those bearing come sealed and factory packed with grease from the bearing factory, not from Can Am or Polaris. The bearing manufacturing knows how much grease to put in the bearings. Filling a sealed bearing completely full of grease until the grease starts coming out can be hard on the bearing. A sealed bearing completely filled with grease can overheat when operating because there is not adequate space for the grease to move around so friction is increased. Pumping grease into the bearing until it comes out typically damages the seals, which defeats the purpose of having a sealed bearing. Just because a new bearing will hold more grease, doesn't mean filling that bearing full makes it better.

For the guys that run in mud and water all the time where the water is up over the top of the tires, greasing the bearings might be worth while to flush the water out. Their seals are going to be ruined very quickly because of the mud and water.

We don't ride that way, and I don't think pumping more grease into the bearing is going to help in our situation.

Just my 2 cents.

XXXXX
 

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If you are in a dry climate and concerned about heat maybe try a few pumps per bearing. Maybe experiment with doing only one front and one rear. They are not that expensive or difficult to replace. This argument can go both directions, but to me I'd rather minimize the space that could be occupied by water. Not just driving deep, but condensation.

I have never done mine. I have been running deep in mud and water for close to 20 years now. Less now in my older years, but I still do. I've definitely had bearings crap out on my SP 700. The 500 HO was a oil bearing. I ordered a greaser and intend to do the bearings on my Touring. I just haven't decided between Red n Tacky or a marine grease.
 

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PoPo I agree with him and you. I have had a number of machines over the years and never had a bearing problem. Never added grease to any of them. With that said, I asked the service expert at the dealership where I work his opinion since I have seen lots of talk about doing it as a part of yearly maintenance. We don't specifically do any bearing greasing as a maintenance item on any ATV or UTV. However they do add a couple squirts of grease to the new bearings when they are replacing a set.

I just ordered the bearing greasers that will cover most of my machines. As your friend said, I don't think blowing out the sealed bearing is a good idea, but maybe a couple extra squirts won't hurt. Like you we don't go mudding or into deep water.
 

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I'll put it to you this way PoPo. I have a 2006 Sportsman 800 that used to be my primary ride. I don't intentionally get it mud and water but it is necessary many times to get where I'm going and at certain times of the year mud and water is unavoidable where I ride here in the Eastern mountains. Out west you guys don't have as much and many places out there are semi-arid.
For the first few years I rode the 800, wheel bearing replacement was at least an annual requirement... Sometimes less than a year! Most years we'll ride 2000 to 3000 miles. When you'd press the old bearing out many times they'd just fall apart. The insides would be dry and worn and usually there was no grease at all left or any that was would just be a dried out hard paste.
You can open up a new Polaris or any other replacement bearing by popping one of the inner races out and they barely have a light film of grease in them. Just enough grease in it to keep the ball bearings from rusting while sitting in the package on the shelf in storage.
Once I started greasing them I don't think I EVER replaced a wheel bearing again! That machine now has 20,000+ miles on it!
Now I don't pump them up till grease runs out the seals and every crack. For a brand new bearing, once installed, I just insert the greaser and give a couple little pumps of good quality high-moly grease. Rotate the greaser about 1/8 turn give a couple more pumps etc. till I've gone all the way around the bearing. I think some of the more expensive greasers lube the whole circumference at once. Mine does not. I greased the wheel bearings this way along with everything else first thing on my new 2018 Sportsman 1000 as soon as I got it home. I've got a little over 2000 miles on it within a year.
After that initial greasing, usually about once a year at least, I will hit them a little the same way when I have the wheels off doing some other maintenance. I don't follow any regular schedule or particular amount of miles or hours. If I have the wheels off doing something else and its been a while since the last time I'll hit them a few pumps.
Given the climate you ride in and if you trade machines every other year as you say you do, then it may not be worth the bother for you to grease them. It WILL make the bearings last MUCH longer and the guy that gets your trade-in won't have to replace wheel bearings first thing lol. :grin
 

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I’m in agreement with Polman. I just greased my bearings for the first time at 500 miles. 3 bearings were in good shape but took a good amount of grease. I pumped until I could just see the seal expanding, a couple pumps each at noon, 3, 6 and 9 o’clock. By the time I got all the way around it was good. My 4th bearing, rear left was gone and had to be replaced. Why one out of four, I couldn’t tell you. Maybe it had less factory grease, maybe that wheel got wet more, who knows.

My dad has a 2002 Arctic Cat with over 10,000 miles and he greased his bearings after he saw me grease mine. His were all still good!

So the argument can go both ways forever. For $15 for a greaser and little trouble once a year, it’s worth it in my books. Gives you a chance to look other things over as well such as brakes, axle boots, suspension components, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'll put it to you this way PoPo. I have a 2006 Sportsman 800 that used to be my primary ride. I don't intentionally get it mud and water but it is necessary many times to get where I'm going and at certain times of the year mud and water is unavoidable where I ride here in the Eastern mountains. Out west you guys don't have as much and many places out there are semi-arid.
For the first few years I rode the 800, wheel bearing replacement was at least an annual requirement... Sometimes less than a year! Most years we'll ride 2000 to 3000 miles. When you'd press the old bearing out many times they'd just fall apart. The insides would be dry and worn and usually there was no grease at all left or any that was would just be a dried out hard paste.
You can open up a new Polaris or any other replacement bearing by popping one of the inner races out and they barely have a light film of grease in them. Just enough grease in it to keep the ball bearings from rusting while sitting in the package on the shelf in storage.
Once I started greasing them I don't think I EVER replaced a wheel bearing again! That machine now has 20,000+ miles on it!
Now I don't pump them up till grease runs out the seals and every crack. For a brand new bearing, once installed, I just insert the greaser and give a couple little pumps of good quality high-moly grease. Rotate the greaser about 1/8 turn give a couple more pumps etc. till I've gone all the way around the bearing. I think some of the more expensive greasers lube the whole circumference at once. Mine does not. I greased the wheel bearings this way along with everything else first thing on my new 2018 Sportsman 1000 as soon as I got it home. I've got a little over 2000 miles on it within a year.
After that initial greasing, usually about once a year at least, I will hit them a little the same way when I have the wheels off doing some other maintenance. I don't follow any regular schedule or particular amount of miles or hours. If I have the wheels off doing something else and its been a while since the last time I'll hit them a few pumps.
Given the climate you ride in and if you trade machines every other year as you say you do, then it may not be worth the bother for you to grease them. It WILL make the bearings last MUCH longer and the guy that gets your trade-in won't have to replace wheel bearings first thing lol. :grin

I just ordered the 44mm for my bike. I agree add a little but not enough to bulge the seal.
 

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Certain riding conditions and styles don't require the bearings to be greased. If I don't grease my bearing won't last 500 miles. So obviously I have to. Hell I'd love to not have to do anything to my wheelers except gas and go.
 

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My bearings have been lasting an average of 1000 miles.

I just bought another set of OEM bearings and some greasers. I put over 20 pumps in each rear bearing, brand new. I go till the grease just starts to escape the seals. Wipe off the excess and make sure the seals are pushed into place

Curious to see how long these ones last.

Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
 

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My bearings have been lasting an average of 1000 miles.

I just bought another set of OEM bearings and some greasers. I put over 20 pumps in each rear bearing, brand new. I go till the grease just starts to escape the seals. Wipe off the excess and make sure the seals are pushed into place

Curious to see how long these ones last.

Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
Mike I grease every 50hrs. I do this every service which is at 50hr intervals. Motor, transaxle, and front diff oils. I also suspension and steering component grease. I willing to bet you double your wheel bearing life by greasing every 50hrs!!!
 

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So why grease car,trucks,trailer,Ferris wheels..... just not Atv wheel bearings?

On the road very little water and dust get into them. Polaris could place a additional seal or use old fashioned "coned" bearing with grease fittings, but that would cost money and people need to maintain them.
 

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The pair of greasers I ordered came yesterday. They should cover all my machines. Something I will be adding to the maintenance list. I think I am in the couple pumps but don't bulge the seal camp on this.
 

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The pair of greasers I ordered came yesterday. They should cover all my machines. Something I will be adding to the maintenance list. I think I am in the couple pumps but don't bulge the seal camp on this.
I agree!! 3-5 pumps done at regular intervals should get'er done.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The pair of greasers I ordered came yesterday. They should cover all my machines. Something I will be adding to the maintenance list. I think I am in the couple pumps but don't bulge the seal camp on this.

All the people I ride with took the feeling NO. But they were getting this from the movies that you pump till the water and grease comes out. Like you, I will only grease a small amount to keep the bearings at minimum grease.
 

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Ordered this bearing greaser on E-Bay for $11.00 https://www.ebay.com/itm/Axle-In-Wheel-Bearing-Greaser-Tool-For-Front-Rear-2014-2018-Polaris-RZR-XP-1000/302738268071?ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649

to be here Thuesday.

Also have brake shoes coming from Amazon on Monday. For 18 850SP; price was $28.45 w/free ship


So this is the first time I’ve seen one of these, yes I don’t get out much, but how exactly does this thing work? do you have to take the hub apart? Anyone have a video they would like to share?


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