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Discussion Starter #1
I wanted to swap tires from my Honda Foreman to my Sportsman. Rather than spend $80 at a shop, I decided to buy a Harbor Freight tire machine. I bolted it on to my trailer as a base. It worked like a charm. I'm actually somewhat impressed. Breaking the bead is always the hardest part, but it had no trouble at all. Hard to beat for $40. I think I would redesign the bar so that it stays hooked on the rim better and doesn't slip off the center post. Otherwise it worked great, and it pays for itself with just a few tire changes.
 

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I have one also. Works pretty damn nice. I've only had trouble breaking one ATV tire. I used my truck and a board and it was still hard.
 

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They have a few in the $40-$50 range. Which one are you guys having good luck with?

Sean
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I bought this one. Portable Tire Changer I was swapping tires and wheels from my Foreman and Sportsman. I did two last night, and 6 today. Took me maybe two hours to do all 6. The only tricky part was getting the second bead on the rim. I think the hook on the end of the tool should be a little longer to better grip the rim and tire. Otherwise it worked pretty good. Hard to beat for less than $40 with a coupon. I don't think I'd use it on really big wheels or expensive mags, but for ATVs, trailers, small car tires etc. it can't be beat.
 

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It will break the bead also? Of did you get a separate bead breaker?

Sean
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Actually it did a really good job breaking the beads. A couple of times I had to move the tire a little bit to find a good spot, or keep moving the bead breaker back in place. Didn't take me more than a minute or to break the beads on each one.
 

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For breaking the beads that are resistant, I would push down with the breaker lever then spray some WD-40 in there and release. Rotate the wheel and do it again. Get about a third of the bead wet then go back to the middle of that area and work it again. Only once have I needed to go the the truck tire and board technique.

robk, I agree that the part of the install handle doesn't hook on the rim good enough. I ended up never using that end. I do all the install with the single lever end. I put my knee on the tire to help hold it in place as I work my way around. Two people would make it real easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That is exactly what I was thinking. An extra pair of hands would make all the difference. I too ended up holding the tire with my knee and using the other end of the bar to pry the bead on.
 

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I went with the Bead Buster through Amazon.com. Works on all tires, only weighs 3lb and fits in my toolbox. Hooks itself to the wheel and breaks the bead with a socket. I used my cordless impact with a 3/4 impact socket. Even the 8 ply Bear Claw HTRs that I just changed went on smoothly with a pair of tire spoons. More expensive at a hundred bucks, but a lot less effort to get the beads broken and takes up no room in my garage. Just my opinion for what it's worth.
 

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Glad to read this! I have been on the fence about buying one of those, nice to know that they work good.
 

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I went with the Bead Buster through Amazon.com. Works on all tires, only weighs 3lb and fits in my toolbox. Hooks itself to the wheel and breaks the bead with a socket. I used my cordless impact with a 3/4 impact socket. Even the 8 ply Bear Claw HTRs that I just changed went on smoothly with a pair of tire spoons. More expensive at a hundred bucks, but a lot less effort to get the beads broken and takes up no room in my garage. Just my opinion for what it's worth.
I use the tire tool for mower, car, trailer, and pickup truck tires as well. The bead breaker works pretty well with modifications to widen the push plate. I added some gussets where the upright pipe meets the base and the plate under the wheel. You can't buy the steel for $40. It'd take me a day to weld one up, so a half hour of rework with a welder was not a big deal.
It stores hanging in the rafters on some hooks when I'm not using it so it's pretty much out of the way. I used the internal threaded flush anchors just like the guy in the video so they are not in the way on the middle of the floor unlike Redhead studs and they don't loosen up like the Redheads either. I do have to blow them out before I set up the changer tho.

You don't have problems with the bead buster bending or marking up the bead area on aluminum wheels?
 

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You don't have problems with the bead buster bending or marking up the bead area on aluminum wheels?[/QUOTE]

I have not used the Bead Buster on Aluminum wheels as yet. However I do not believe it would cause any issues. If you have not seen one, the leg that clamps it to the inside of the wheel is covered in rubber, the foot has a sharp edge that you put between the rim and tire and is pushed straight down. So I do not believe there would be any damage to the rim. The only time the wheel could get scraped up would be with the tire spoons and if you pad them that can be avoided. You can get padded tire spoons too. Pry bars or screwdrivers will work, but I would avoid them on aluminum wheels. Tire spoons are designed with the edges softened and the tips formed to make changing easiest and the chance of damage is minimized.
 

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I'm gonna find out how the BeadBuster works on aluminum wheels before the end of the week. Just ordered a set of Moose wheels for the wife's machine. Dealership wants to charge me their hourly labor rate to change them. Figures 1 hour will do it at $68 per hour. Between the change I did when I got the tires, and this change, the BeadBuster has paid for itself.....And I still need to get tires for my 600 yet.
 

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Mounted up the tires on the new wheels today. No sweat getting the 8ply Bear Claws off the stock wheels with the Bead Buster. Got the first on mounted up then figured out that Moose had sent new valve stems with the lug nuts. Bead Buster popped the outer bead right off the Moose Wheel so I could swap it out. The wheel on these just inside the bead is slanted, not straight in the center so I was wondering how it would work. No Problem! Did not mar the polished aluminum wheel at all.


 

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Is this what y'all are talking about?

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B009XJARD4?pc_redir=1407281266&robot_redir=1[/ame]
 

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Holy freakin' chit that thing costs $100 bucks. Damn!

Anyone with some metal cutting equipment and a welder could easily build that themselves. Probably $15 bucks in material.
 

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Holy freakin' chit that thing costs $100 bucks. Damn!

Anyone with some metal cutting equipment and a welder could easily build that themselves. Probably $15 bucks in material.
Yup, it's a 100 bucks. But IT WORKS as advertised. As I said in a previous post, the dealership where I bought the wheels wanted their hourly labor rate to change the tires. so I was gonna spend at least $70. When I got the tires from Bike Bandit, I would have had to spend the same amount to get them mounted on the stock wheels. So by now it has paid for itself.
 
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