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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I decided to be a stickler about using anti-seize on my lugs when I read somehwere that people were popping studs on the trails. So I got some and las night I took off my wheel to inspect the breaks and figured it would be a good time to put the anti-seize on. I ended up snapping the first lug I tried to torque, and now I'm trying to figure out what went wrong.

With the wheel off I put a thing coating of ant-seize on all the studs.
Then I put the wheel on and ran the lugs up with my fingers a few turns.
From there I used the impact to snug them up, giving each one a second or two of sinching with the impact.
Finally I set my torque wrench to 75 lb. and got after it.

On the first one it never felt "snug" and eventually snapped the lug.

I'm running two inch spacers, and these studs are the ones that came with the spacers. So could it be that they're just junk studs? Any ideas why I snapped the stud?

Thanks!
 

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Well I never use an impact on an ATV for wheels, but at 75lbs it's sounds like the studs are junk.
 

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75 ft/lb will break and/or strip the OEM studs, so I'm not surprised the studs on the spacers break also. Speaking from experience on this matter. I will not go more than 65 ft/lb anymore, and have never had a wheel come loose.
 

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75lbs WOW!!!! I don't use anti seize and torque mine to 35ft lbs. I wouldn't use an impact on an ATV but alot of people do. I don't know what rims you are running but you better check makers recomendations for torque. I have a set of Maxxis 8 Spokes and they recommend 32.5ft lbs is all. With anti seize it is a new ball game when it comes to torque specs. I think you have to lighten up your torque to keep from breaking studs.

Ronnie
 

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Yeah I thought 75 sounded a little high lol
 

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Although it looks like that's what the manual for his atv specs...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I was told once that published torque specs are typically spec'd for lubed threads. The idea is that torquing dry allows for the friction in the threads to impeed the ability for the torque to transfer all the way through the bolt. So after a certain point all you're doing is twisting the bolt, weakening it.

So this was why I tried to torque to 75 lbs with anti-seize.

After some more reading I'm of the belief that the specs given are for dry threads. One test showed that calculated torques for the same application (when compared between wet and dry) were cut in HALF (or more) for lubed threads.

So I think 35 with anti-seize is what I'll try.
 

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when torquing wheel nuts the studs need to be clean and free of any lubes like anti seize.. torque specs only work with clean dry threads once you add a film of any kind oil / grease / anti seize you don't get a true torque the wrench might say 75 ft lb but you were most likely well over 100 ft lb where the threads were not clean and dry..
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The 75 dry is a true 35 (approx) wet. "Torque" in this application is essentially stretching the bolt. If you have dry threads, they bind up, and when you turn the head of the bolt, the bottom of it doesn't turn as much, so you end up twisting the bolt. When the threads are lubed the friction between the threads is reduced, which allows the entire bolt rotate properly.

So I never got to 75 true pounds. The studs were not designed to withstand 75 true pounds. They're designed for about 35 or 40, which is what you get if you torque dry to 75.

I think you have it backwards Ice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Bottom line is anti-seize is best practice, but you need to half the torque... or get better studs lol.
 

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The tapper lug nuts let you torque them as they start to tapper into the rim grooves. Alum lug nuts are flat so once they are tight thats it dont go any further. I would never put anti seize on lugs if anything while running spacers apply med strength locktite

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The crowning example of this is head studs. Manuals specifically tell you to use oil on the threads. That's because their torque requirement is much more precise than anywhere else.
 

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The reason to use anti seize is because brake temperatures reach upwards of 1000 degrees. Which will rust and corrode lug studs especially aluminum components.

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What wheels are you running. The Polaris manual is for Polaris wheels and nothing else That is why I said find out from the maker what the recommended torque is for their wheel. My maxxis 8 spokes don't even come close to what Polaris says to torque wheels.

Ronnie
 

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1/2 " drive ratchet with short ext. Had my wheels off and on many times. Never had one fall off OR wrecked one

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
According to my dealer, my 2" spacers are STI Slashers. The studs are threaded through the spacer. They are the black steel 3/8" 24- 1/2" socket cap screws. The dealer wanted $3+, I got them at Ace for $1.10.

Also, I removed all four studs (well, three plus the new one) and the spacer itself and put everything back together using anti-seize. I torqued to 50 ft lbs. and it felt solid, both on the bike lugs (holding the spacer on) and the spacer lugs (holding the wheel on). I'll let you know if anything ever falls off! If I survive it.
 
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