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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm back.. as I promised I would be.. with again some more silly questions..
The battery in my '18 Sportsman 450HO EPS seems pretty weak and has a 10.5 volt reading on the cluster today - although it does charge at an indicated 14.5 volt range when started and idling - so I assume that means the voltage regulator works well, but after sitting a week or so in -5 degree nights, the charge slowly drops off and it barely cranks sufficiently to start.
It's going to get a lot colder very soon and this original battery is 4 years old now and I realize it needs replacement.
Anyone care to comment on what is an expected timeframe for an OEM battery to last in a climate of cold Winters and fairly warm Summers should be? Other than an indicated 53hrs and 430kms of usage, I have no history of what use or abuse it might have been subjected to as second-hand piece to me..
I heard a new larger 'optional or upgraded larger size' of Polaris battery for newer Sportsman models is now available so I could opt for a new one of those I imagine.
Is that the most practical choice or have any of you found that AGM battery types or even regular wet cell versions from jobbers intended for utility equipment, to be just as good or better than Polaris branded ones as long as they are sealed for 'my normal use', which wouldn't be crashing through mud holes or really hard riding on rough trails etc. - just getting firewood and cruising around 'old man' style usage?
Anyone care to comment from experience on what they consider is the best type and/or brand of battery to install in a 450 HO EPS model which will give me the most long term durability and reliability?
I also have a small Battery Tender brand 'Junior' model used to keep my last quad wet cell utility battery perked up - would something like this be a good method of protection for a battery in an unheated Winter storage situation to help protect it - even when temperatures drop to -25 degrees or so occasionally?
In other words - can a battery freeze up or be ruined - despite it being hooked up to a trickle charger?
I don't like the idea of often having to install any battery in the cold or otherwise - considering where Polaris has so conveniently mounted it down so deep in the frame, especially if I choose to use the quad occasionally during mild Winter weather spells - so leaving it on a tender and installed in the quad would obviously be the best route if it would work well..
Additionally, I'd also like to install some LED bulbs in place of the halogen types - the manual doesn't specify what the OEM bulb numbers are - other than just "Halogen and 50 watts" each.
Does anyone know what type by bulb number I should look for as a LED replacement for both the low beam pair and high beam single and correct for this application?
Thanks again for the patience and any help with all of my questions - there will probably be more going forward!
Randy
 

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2004 Sportsman 700, 2004 Scrambler 500, Various Others.
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The reflector housings on your quad were not designed for led bulbs and will protrude light much less far than your halogens. Best to either get a light bar or stick with the halogens. An autozone or equivalent agm battery is just as good and probably better than the Polaris battery. If you are storing during cold weather I would expect a battery to go dead in 4 years. It may last longer if you keep it on the trickle charger, especially in the cold or extended storage (a week or so)
 

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I also have a small Battery Tender brand 'Junior' model used to keep my last quad wet cell utility battery perked up - would something like this be a good method of protection for a battery in an unheated Winter storage situation to help protect it - even when temperatures drop to -25 degrees or so occasionally?
Battery Tender Jr. would be a dramatic help as for maintaining battery voltage.

Do a Community Search input the words "Battery Tender Jr."
 
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Batteries will last longer being kept cold than warm, but have a lower output when cold. CCA (Cold Cranking Amps) is measured at 0 degrees F, so a battery with 330 CCA may have 450 to 500 amps available at 70 degrees. Average life of a battery is determined by the materials and usage of the battery so average is about 3 or 4 years - some will last 5 to 10 and others less than a year just due to neglect.

Now most ATV's will not have a charging voltage until the engine is above about 2500 RPM (some higher and some lower). It's a good idea to determine the RPM required to attain "break even voltage" of your ATV because below that RPM you are using the battery 100% and above that RPM it begins to replenish the charge on the battery. Average break even RPM is around 2400 to 2600 RPM on a permanent magnet alternator driven directly by the crankshaft.

Having over 14 volts at idle, I would test the charging system for a shorted rectifier or stator. I would be suspicious of AC intrusion into the DC circuit and AC will kill a battery.

A discharged battery will freeze more quickly than a fully charged battery, but in extreme cold conditions a battery may require protection from freezing. A lead acid battery in good condition is usually safe to about -30*F, but loses about 20% of it's cold cranking amps. A relatively new fully charged battery may only have some ice crystals at -50*F and lose about 50% of the CCA, but a constant low amperage draw (like a clock, digital radio, alarm system or ECU of an EFI) will help protect the battery to even lower temperatures and at the same time weaken the available CCA for starting.

I'm waiting to see how the electric vehicles fare in sub zero temperatures when running both lights and heaters with cabin heat being the biggest drain on the battery. A new EV rated for 300 miles on a charge may only be good for 150 miles in the dead of winter with heater/defroster, lights, windshield wipers, navigation system and communications (radio) all on at the same time and a year or two old EV may only have a 30 mile range under the same conditions. It will be interesting to see where technology takes us and what will we do with all the diesel-electric locomotives? Electrify the rails and eliminate the fuel tanks and engine? Where will the train be in the dead of winter during a power failure caused by snow on the tracks? Where will we get all the electricity to power all the electric devices? The power companies are already asking us to conserve and we are just adding to the demand. Conundrum?

A battery is not like to freeze when connected to a Battery Tender.

I have no idea about LED replacements, I'm happy with having lights.
 

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Batteries will last longer being kept cold than warm, but have a lower output when cold. CCA (Cold Cranking Amps) is measured at 0 degrees F, so a battery with 330 CCA may have 450 to 500 amps available at 70 degrees. Average life of a battery is determined by the materials and usage of the battery so average is about 3 or 4 years - some will last 5 to 10 and others less than a year just due to neglect.

Now most ATV's will not have a charging voltage until the engine is above about 2500 RPM (some higher and some lower). It's a good idea to determine the RPM required to attain "break even voltage" of your ATV because below that RPM you are using the battery 100% and above that RPM it begins to replenish the charge on the battery. Average break even RPM is around 2400 to 2600 RPM on a permanent magnet alternator driven directly by the crankshaft.

Having over 14 volts at idle, I would test the charging system for a shorted rectifier or stator. I would be suspicious of AC intrusion into the DC circuit and AC will kill a battery.

A discharged battery will freeze more quickly than a fully charged battery, but in extreme cold conditions a battery may require protection from freezing. A lead acid battery in good condition is usually safe to about -30*F, but loses about 20% of it's cold cranking amps. A relatively new fully charged battery may only have some ice crystals at -50*F and lose about 50% of the CCA, but a constant low amperage draw (like a clock, digital radio, alarm system or ECU of an EFI) will help protect the battery to even lower temperatures and at the same time weaken the available CCA for starting.

I'm waiting to see how the electric vehicles fare in sub zero temperatures when running both lights and heaters with cabin heat being the biggest drain on the battery. A new EV rated for 300 miles on a charge may only be good for 150 miles in the dead of winter with heater/defroster, lights, windshield wipers, navigation system and communications (radio) all on at the same time and a year or two old EV may only have a 30 mile range under the same conditions. It will be interesting to see where technology takes us and what will we do with all the diesel-electric locomotives? Electrify the rails and eliminate the fuel tanks and engine? Where will the train be in the dead of winter during a power failure caused by snow on the tracks? Where will we get all the electricity to power all the electric devices? The power companies are already asking us to conserve and we are just adding to the demand. Conundrum?

A battery is not like to freeze when connected to a Battery Tender.

I have no idea about LED replacements, I'm happy with having lights.
Just bought a new Battery Tender Smart Lithium battery I ride very short periods of time 5 minutes to woods 5 minutes back after 3 or 4 hrs of work low speeds had it for a week will let you know more after a year 3 year warranty bit on the expensive side $199.95 + tax
 

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Don't even sound like that's long enough to get the machine up to operating temperature to keep everything charged and flowing. Surprised you're not following spark plugs with that little of use and then shutting it back off
 
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Don't even sound like that's long enough to get the machine up to operating temperature to keep everything charged and flowing. Surprised you're not following spark plugs with that little of use and then shutting it back off
I was worried about keeping the battery charged ( not using my tender ) but have been doing the same thing with our older 2006 450 sportsman for a couple of seasons now. No problems
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
I was going to make up my own battery relocating deal but its too cold to fart around in the garage welding up something now and I'm getting to old and arthritic to play those games in the cold!
I looked at the Quad Logic site and they now have a new 'bigger' battery relocate kit to fit as the name implies a 'bigger' battery - so I ordered one and it is apparently on its way to me now..
Once here, I want to cut out the small bracket intended for the hold down strap mount that is mounted inside the box limiting the size of battery that can go in the tray somewhat, to give me as much room as possible and then with the modified box will go around and try and find the biggest CCA AGM rated battery that I can squeeze into it and call it a day!
I have a friend in the battery business who say he can get me a 350+ rated CCA version for less than a $100 SO WE'LL SEE HOW IT PANS OUT..
Lithium deals are too expensive and flaky right now, considering the price and apparent failure rate for me to take a flyer on one yet - so I'll stick to proven AGM tech and use my Battery Tender Jr. and go from there..
 

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I was going to make up my own battery relocating deal but its too cold to fart around in the garage welding up something now and I'm getting to old and arthritic to play those games in the cold!
I looked at the Quad Logic site and they now have a new 'bigger' battery relocate kit to fit as the name implies a 'bigger' battery - so I ordered one and it is apparently on its way to me now..
Once here, I want to cut out the small bracket intended for the hold down strap mount that is mounted inside the box limiting the size of battery that can go in the tray somewhat, to give me as much room as possible and then with the modified box will go around and try and find the biggest CCA AGM rated battery that I can squeeze into it and call it a day!
I have a friend in the battery business who say he can get me a 350+ rated CCA version for less than a $100 SO WE'LL SEE HOW IT PANS OUT..
Lithium deals are too expensive and flaky right now, considering the price and apparent failure rate for me to take a flyer on one yet - so I'll stick to proven AGM tech and use my Battery Tender Jr. and go from there..
With the Lithium I have 480 cca and it comes with foam spacer pads as it is smaller than original. Have been running lithium battery’s in my Harley & Big Dog chopper for awhile now. The one in my Road Glide is 3 years + never been on a tender & sits for months as I split my time between Florida and N Carolina. It did cost more but didn’t have to buy a new battery box or relocate anything, part # BTL24A480CW 6.89 inches length , 3.425 inches wide, 5.61 inches high. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I did today manage to pick up an AGM battery which I think will do me for a few years going forward.
I took my new battery tray in and found that a 30L-BS battery came closest to fitting it (I may have to cut and weld on one side slightly to get 1/8" clearance - which isn't a big deal, and get out my tools and cut out the bracket inside the tray that is there for the elastic band retainer to attach up) and I'll be good to go!
Rated at 440CCA, it should easily get me by and I can still retain my Battery Tender Jr. for trickle charging and maintaining that charge during the cold weather ahead as well!
 

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The lithium battery in my CRF250 is 6 years old and still works like new - I do put it on a Battery Tender for a day or two twice a year. Was well worth the $169 vs the $60 YTX5L that had to be replaced every 1, 2 or 3 years depending to the brand and amount of abuse I could impose upon it riding off road. I had put $420 worth of AGM batteries in it the first 11 years I owned it and one $169 battery the last 6 years (still going strong on 7). I'm satisfied.
 
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