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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 92 Big Boss 250 6 wheeler. Just picked up a 92 Big Boss 350 4 wheeler for parts. In my conversation with the guy, he said I'd be able to swap the middle 22" wheels with the 25" from the 350 and run on 4 wheels until weight in the box pushed it down to run on 6 again. Didn't work. Rear shock just keeps pushing the backs farther down. In retrospect, I'm thinking that this might put too much strain on the bearings in the shaft of the centers. Would it work to move the 25" to the rears and put the 22" in the center or will my weight push those centers down when I get on? There are a lot of sharp turns in my trail and dragging rears tears it up a lot, which is the reason behind this attempt.
 

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You can't run different sized wheels, because there diameters are different. You understand why, correct? To improve steering on ours, I maxed the rear springs and minimized the center ones. That did help.

Nice to have you here with us Nick. There are darn few 6x6 owners here.
 

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Thanks! Makes perfect sense to me... pi*D means one set or the other would be chewing things up... trail, gears, tires, etc. After being told to do this by someone who was presented to me as "THE 6 wheeler wizard" it seemed kinda off... I didn't want to offend a wizard and get turned into a frog or something.:eek::ROFLMAO:

That's why I came here with the ?, to see if this could/should be done. I haven't had to do much wrenching on this thing even though I've had it 14 years, so I wasn't sure. Thought there might be some sort of "slip" built in somehow somewhere...
 

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When we do a corner on our 6x6 or a 4x4 for that matter, all the wheels are going different speeds. That's why they need to have differential axles built into them. In the case of a 6x6, one set of them will need to slide sideways a bit. Our machines not being all that heavy, this doesn't cause very much wear on the tires but does reduce our ability to steer the machine. I also reduced the PSI in the center tires to help them side. What do you do with your machine?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have them all at 5-8 PSI per the sidewall info. Mine is actually 4x6. The trails go from high land through hills with woods, lots of turns and soft ground; then over boardwalks (again with turns) through wetlands; to higher ground again by a flowage (still very soft). That side slide on the turns really dig ruts in the trail which we also try to mow. We haul gas cans, batteries & fishing equipment mostly - it's close to 1/4 mile by trail. Right now I have a couple cords worth of cherry logs stacked up down close to the water to haul up too. Steering definitely sucks loaded down or with a passenger. The lawn tractor and garden trailer can only make it up the hills if it's not too wet or too loaded down. Lots of roots in the trails too. I fill them but it tends to washout.
 

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I'd suggest modifying your machines suspension and tire PSI as earlier suggested. We also sometimes run a weight on the front. I'm not certian it makes any difference if its 4x6 or 6x6 or not.
 
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