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Unless you are drag racing it, I don't know why you would want N2O. I can't answer the question, but I think the guys that do sand drags with their ATVs spray them. Maybe one of them could aim you in the right direction. I can't imagine there would be enough demand that any of the companies would make a kit for it, but a phone call can't hurt. I am interested in the answer if you find out something.
 

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N2O can be injected into any engine - it's simply a way to get more air into the combustion chamber. N2O is very cold when released from under pressure.
How much nitrous can I put to a 2018 Polaris sportsman 850 highlifter.
You can put as much Nitrous into the engine as it is capable of utilizing.

Nitrous is not a fuel - it is 1 atom of nitrogen and 2 atoms of oxygen - neither N or O is flammable. The purpose of Nitrous injection is to condense air going into the combustion chamber to get more pressure during the combustion cycle. Somewhat similar to turbo-charging or supercharging at a much lower cost. Not only is the air condensed, but oxygen is added to support the combustion of a larger quantity of fuel.

An engine's power comes from its fuel, which expands with great force when it ignites. The more fuel you can burn, the more power you make. A typical engine's power is not limited by fuel flow, but air flow. Your fuel system can supply more fuel than the combustion process can burn wasting fuel and causing a loss of power. If you want to burn more fuel, you need more oxygen in the combustion chamber to burn all the fuel supplied. When there is not enough oxygen present for the amount of fuel supplied, the excess doesn't burn. The bottleneck is air, or more specifically, oxygen.

To burn and release its energy, gasoline requires enormous amounts of oxygen from the air. It's not so different from a human athlete, who also requires oxygen to keep muscles moving and the brain alert. When there isn't enough air, the inanimate and the human machine falter. Forced induction like turbocharging and supercharging packs more air into the combustion chamber so the engine can burn more fuel and make more power.

Nitrous oxide (which can be combined with those technologies) takes a different approach. Rather than pump air to pack more of it into the engine, nitrous chills the air, making it much denser and greatly increasing the amount of oxygen by volume - the denser the air, the closer together its molecules, the more oxygen one has available. Hood scoops and ram air, etc., are designed to bring in cooler, more oxygen-rich air from beyond the engine compartment and enhance performance.

When drag racers - on the track or within the silver-screen-story of the "Fast and the Furious" movies - hit a nitrous shot, the flammable substance they're cramming into their engine intakes is not the nitrous itself but additional fuel that can be burned because of the huge rush of oxygen the supercooled air contains. All of that oxygen combines with the gas present, which burns to make power. Nitrous adds so much oxygen, in fact, that a nitrous-oxide system will provide supplemental fuel too, to avoid a lean condition. When there is too much oxygen for the fuel available, there will be too much flame and too much heat inside the cylinder, which can scorch pistons and create other problems.

While the compound nitrous oxide is not flammable, it breaks down at around 565 degrees Fahrenheit and the oxygen liberated at that point will help burn fuel like any other oxygen. Nitrous thus adds oxygen two ways - by supercooling the air that accompanies the nitrous-fuel mix, and by freeing oxygen itself when it reaches its dissociation temperature inside the much hotter combustion chamber. There are some complex discussions to be had about nitrous displacing air in the intake but everyone agrees there's a demonstrable gain from nitrous use so that's pretty academic stuff.

You can add nitrous to almost any internal combustion engine. Speed freaks have added it to just about every sort of engine you can name. Proceed with caution, though, because nitrous can damage engines if improperly fitted or used, and can hurt people if the vehicle fails catastrophically or the supercool nitrous gets on your skin. And remember that increased power also means increased stresses on engine components. Power is an addictive thing (human history proves it), and there's a tendency always to want a little more. Push your engine too hard or too often and you'll wear it out or break it.
 
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