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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys I am New to the Polaris Scene. I have been atving for over 30 years but always had hondas and kawasakis until now. I recently bought a 2015 570 sportsman and man what a difference. My first bike with rear independent suspension. Anyway I bought an oil change kit on Amazon that was supposed to be for my bike but when I opened it up and went to change the filter I noticed the new one was a little longer and a different part number. I put it on thinking it was just an updated part but turns out it is not. The original part number was 2521424 and the filter in the kit was 2540086. I believe it will work but just want to make sure before I take it out for a ride. Went on, no leaks yet, but just looking for confirmation. Anyone know f this will cause issues? From what I saw online most people prefer the shorter filter because of damage from objects hitting it, but it looks pretty secure there. Thanks everyone and let me know what you think. Ken
 

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It’s a 10 micron vs 12 and an inch or so longer. It will work, but it may be more prone to damage being that it is longer.
 

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Thanks, that is what I was thinking. I think I might just leave it for now and just do next oil change sooner rather than later. Bike only has 400 miles on it, but the guy I bought it from was in his 70s and I am sure this was the first oil change it ever had.
 

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2521424 and 3089996 were both superseded to 2520799 - both are made with 12 micron media - if you order 2521424 you will get 2520799.

2540086 is made with 10 micron media

The manufacturer (Polaris) determined the engine should be equipped with a 12 micron filter - I suggest you use a filter constructed with the recommended media paper.

HiFlo filter HF199 and K&N KN199 will work nicely as well a Wix, Purolator, NAPA and several other brands. The brand is not as important as the grade length of filter media contained within the canister.

While 10 micron sounds like better filtering and longer engine life, it may in fact cause oil starvation and result in engine damage.

While it may screw on and seal, it is not the correct filter for the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I never thought about it starving the engine. I guess I better do another oil change before I go out for a ride. I does make sense that too much filtration may cause poor oil flow.
 

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I never thought about it starving the engine. I guess I better do another oil change before I go out for a ride. I does make sense that too much filtration may cause poor oil flow.
Although Latebird is correct, the difference between 10 and 12 Micron is negligible and won’t cause your engine to starve of oil. You will be fine with this oil change and on the next one you can install the correct filter.
 

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2521424 and 3089996 were both superseded to 2520799 - both are made with 12 micron media - if you order 2521424 you will get 2520799.

2540086 is made with 10 micron media

The manufacturer (Polaris) determined the engine should be equipped with a 12 micron filter - I suggest you use a filter constructed with the recommended media paper.

HiFlo filter HF199 and K&N KN199 will work nicely as well a Wix, Purolator, NAPA and several other brands. The brand is not as important as the grade length of filter media contained within the canister.

While 10 micron sounds like better filtering and longer engine life, it may in fact cause oil starvation and result in engine damage.

While it may screw on and seal, it is not the correct filter for the engine.
Latebird your post got me wondering on filters I’ve been using. Purolator ML16817 which on their site is a confirmed fitment for 2017 Sportsman 570. I looked but can’t find size of media. Any ideas where to find? This only thing I found:
41D7CD93-9148-477B-B0D3-FD1F8CC16269.jpeg
 

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Key word is MAY - it is not likely as the filter has a flow relief valve built into it to allow oil to bypass the filter if the filter restricts oil flow due to being dirty, media failure and other possibilities, but the pressure relief value may be different for different filter media. If the bypass valve opens at 10 psi and it takes 12 psi to get oil to flow through the media, the filter will be in bypass most of the time. If the bypass valve is set at 40 psi and the filter media needs 20 psi for the oil to flow through and oil pressure is 10 psi at idle, there will be a restricted flow to the engine which will lead to damage. It's just better to have the correct filter as called for by the engineer. NOTE: cheaper oil filters may have less feet of filter media reducing the cost to manufacture, but the media is usually the micron rating specified for the application and FRAM filters are cheapened even more by using paper media end caps vs metal end caps used by all other oil filter manufacturers. Fram filters are well known for deterioration with filter material clogging oil passages and orifices leading to engine damage.

Do not change the oil immediately as warmer temperatures will contribute to oil circulation and as Gmartino states, the difference between 10 and 12 micron is small, but the difference between 5 and 10 micron is 50%. If you are concerned, just change the filter and top off the oil. I recommend simply installing the correct filter at the next change interval.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you guys! I really appreciate all your help! I can't wait to take this sportsman out and see what it can really do.
 

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Latebird your post got me wondering on filters I’ve been using. Purolator ML16817 which on their site is a confirmed fitment for 2017 Sportsman 570. I looked but can’t find size of media. Any ideas where to find?
Almost all filters are designed to meet the minimum requirement of the manufacturer. When the minimum requirement is exceeded and the product is advertised as 'better' than OEM, problems may occur.

Purolator has recently posted this on their web page:
If you're thinking you want to install a PureONE oil filter on your bike, please think again. PureONE oil filters are designed for vehicles, not bikes. Because of PureONE's high efficiency, the motorcycle oil pump may not be able to handle the pressure. The Purolator motorcycle filter line is designed to meet the specific needs of a bike; therefore we highly recommend the use of a Purolator ML filter over a PureONE oil filter.

Now this statement appears to be an attempt to absolve Purolator of liability for those people installing 'superior' filtration on their engines and ultimately suffering engine damage. Example: The old Honda 750/4 and the Triumph 650 Bonneville (dry sump oil systems) produced up to or over 100 psi of oil pressure - the Honda used a gearotor pump and the Triumph used a piston pump and the engines used plain bearings on the crankshaft - the Kawasaki KZ900 has a roller bearing crankshaft that does not have to 'float' the crankshaft in the bearing shells, so the KZ900 had a low pressure high volume pump because the bearings ran metal to metal and only required flow (oil supply) to maintain lubrication. A pressure of 12 to 14 psi was normal for the Kaw. In this example, if the oil filter needs 20 psi of pressure to flow oil through the media and 21 psi to open the relief valve, the engine suffers because the pump has to overcome the restriction of the filter before sufficient oil gets to the moving parts.

In this case we are talking about the Polaris 570 engine which has a roller bearing rod on a crankshaft that is carried on ball bearings - this engine needs flow ahead of pressure which means a restriction in the oil filter could lead to engine damage, so a larger micron filter is better than a small micron filter. In the short term, a small micron filter will not hurt anything, but the filter clogs faster which will restrict flow. If the oil is changed frequently enough, no filter is needed. Oil filters were installed to reduce the frequency of oil changes and extend the oil supply which was a major concern in the early days of the internal combustion engines which were made with fast wearing cast iron. Today's alloy engines do not wear as fast, last longer and the oil stays cleaner longer due to improved ring sealing and slower wearing materials. The old flat head Ford I had needed the engine rebuilt 3 times in 100,000 miles - the 4.6 in my 97 F150 has over 200,000 miles and the only part of the engine that has been replaced is the spark plugs - oil pressure is about the same as when new and with regular maintenance there is no reason the engine will fail between now and 300,000 miles - the rest of the truck will deteriorate into a heap of rust and broken parts, but the engine is fine.

For my money, the HiFlo, Walmart, NAPA or Tractor Supply oil filter are adequate - I change the oil every 3000 miles on cars and trucks, 2000 miles on my road bikes, every 3rd race on my race bike and twice a year on my ATV's whether they get ridden or not. Neither my TRX400EX or LTZ400 has been out of cold storage (an unheated garage) in two years as I currently work 7 days a week, but they get started and the oil changed twice a year.

Hope this is helpful.
 

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Almost all filters are designed to meet the minimum requirement of the manufacturer. When the minimum requirement is exceeded and the product is advertised as 'better' than OEM, problems may occur.

Purolator has recently posted this on their web page:
If you're thinking you want to install a PureONE oil filter on your bike, please think again. PureONE oil filters are designed for vehicles, not bikes. Because of PureONE's high efficiency, the motorcycle oil pump may not be able to handle the pressure. The Purolator motorcycle filter line is designed to meet the specific needs of a bike; therefore we highly recommend the use of a Purolator ML filter over a PureONE oil filter.

Now this statement appears to be an attempt to absolve Purolator of liability for those people installing 'superior' filtration on their engines and ultimately suffering engine damage. Example: The old Honda 750/4 and the Triumph 650 Bonneville (dry sump oil systems) produced up to or over 100 psi of oil pressure - the Honda used a gearotor pump and the Triumph used a piston pump and the engines used plain bearings on the crankshaft - the Kawasaki KZ900 has a roller bearing crankshaft that does not have to 'float' the crankshaft in the bearing shells, so the KZ900 had a low pressure high volume pump because the bearings ran metal to metal and only required flow (oil supply) to maintain lubrication. A pressure of 12 to 14 psi was normal for the Kaw. In this example, if the oil filter needs 20 psi of pressure to flow oil through the media and 21 psi to open the relief valve, the engine suffers because the pump has to overcome the restriction of the filter before sufficient oil gets to the moving parts.

In this case we are talking about the Polaris 570 engine which has a roller bearing rod on a crankshaft that is carried on ball bearings - this engine needs flow ahead of pressure which means a restriction in the oil filter could lead to engine damage, so a larger micron filter is better than a small micron filter. In the short term, a small micron filter will not hurt anything, but the filter clogs faster which will restrict flow. If the oil is changed frequently enough, no filter is needed. Oil filters were installed to reduce the frequency of oil changes and extend the oil supply which was a major concern in the early days of the internal combustion engines which were made with fast wearing cast iron. Today's alloy engines do not wear as fast, last longer and the oil stays cleaner longer due to improved ring sealing and slower wearing materials. The old flat head Ford I had needed the engine rebuilt 3 times in 100,000 miles - the 4.6 in my 97 F150 has over 200,000 miles and the only part of the engine that has been replaced is the spark plugs - oil pressure is about the same as when new and with regular maintenance there is no reason the engine will fail between now and 300,000 miles - the rest of the truck will deteriorate into a heap of rust and broken parts, but the engine is fine.

For my money, the HiFlo, Walmart, NAPA or Tractor Supply oil filter are adequate - I change the oil every 3000 miles on cars and trucks, 2000 miles on my road bikes, every 3rd race on my race bike and twice a year on my ATV's whether they get ridden or not. Neither my TRX400EX or LTZ400 has been out of cold storage (an unheated garage) in two years as I currently work 7 days a week, but they get started and the oil changed twice a year.

Hope this is helpful.
Yes I’ve seen that for the PureOne filters but the Purolator Powersports line is specific for powersports and made for Atv’s and on their site even today confirms ML16817 for a Sportsman 570. I was just wondering the media thickness as I couldn’t find it.
9293C344-FA41-4504-9CCE-D4BF1E389F5D.jpeg
 

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It is probably 12 micron as it meets the specification of the engine design - Purolator does not publish that information - a college student might take one apart and test the media as a lab project and release the findings - just for your info, a coffee filter is about 20 microns and a COVID-19 virus is about .17 microns - the N95 will filter out 95% of particles larger than .7 microns - that means 5 COVID-19 virus particles can pass through the mask side by side unimpeded. The mask will stop 100% of exhaled bodily fluid particles that might carry the virus, but the virus can still penetrate the mask. A double layer of bandana will filter particles larger than 50 microns - saw dust is as small as 30 microns. Are you wearing a mask during the scamdemic we are presently enduring?

Here's what I could find on the ML16817:
140061


It doesn't address the micron size of the paper, but does note the fact that it uses less paper (= shorter life).
 

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It is probably 12 micron as it meets the specification of the engine design - Purolator does not publish that information - a college student might take one apart and test the media as a lab project and release the findings - just for your info, a coffee filter is about 20 microns and a COVID-19 virus is about .17 microns - the N95 will filter out 95% of particles larger than .7 microns - that means 5 COVID-19 virus particles can pass through the mask side by side unimpeded. The mask will stop 100% of exhaled bodily fluid particles that might carry the virus, but the virus can still penetrate the mask. A double layer of bandana will filter particles larger than 50 microns - saw dust is as small as 30 microns. Are you wearing a mask during the scamdemic we are presently enduring?

Here's what I could find on the ML16817:
View attachment 140061

It doesn't address the micron size of the paper, but does note the fact that it uses less paper (= shorter life).
No, I’m not wearing a mask during this scamdemic either! The “Experts” can’t seem to make their minds up on that one. My Sportsman’s runs fine without N95 filters also! Of course our Governor may be considering that next. I do change oil often though.
 

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Every situation is different. I’ve sank an early model sportsman 500 back when I was 16, it was my GF fathers wheeler. WHOOPS. He pulled the plug, pulled the cord instead of using the starter to get the water out, changed the oil and that was IT. Still running fine 15 years later.

Another time deep in the woods a buddy didn’t know how rude his two stroker dirt bike over a narrow bridge and into the water she went. Pulled the plug kicked it over till the water stopped and then ran it. Changed the oil once home. And that bike ran fine for its usual two stroke rebuild duration.

Of course I recommend doing the best you can to make sure you save the engine and follow the previous good suggestions here but what I am saying is these engine can usually take a hit and keep on ticking
 

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I just stuff the cavity of my TRX400EX with wadded up coffee filters at each change and it has not been a problem - it's an 05 model (sic). Just kidding, but it would work as well as the micro-screen filters that Yamaha installed on many of their ATV's - in fact, the micro-screen 1UY-13440-02-00 is interchangeable with the paper media 5D3-13440-09-00 so the owner has a choice of re-usable or disposable filter - the micro-screen is rated about 40 micron and the paper is 10 micron - the racing version is 5 micron. Typically micro-screen is used as a pre-filter or in applications where flow is more important than cleanliness. Crankshafts are typically polished with a 400 grit sanding media (about 25 micron particles).

Edit: Here's an excellent article about oil filters OIL FILTERS 101.
 
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