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Discussion Starter #1
I have tried, unsuccessfully, to find a thread describing how to access the one way clutch in my 2004.5 Sportsman 400. From what I have learned, the center of the drive clutch should turn freely in one direction when the sheaves are fully separated at idle or when engine is not running. Mine is not turning at all making it difficult to shift. The parts blowups do not even show this bearing, which the service manual calls the one way clutch. However, the service manual does not detail how to access the part. Can anyone tell me me how to get at it? I assume that you have to remove the whole clutch with the removal tool but what then? Do I need a press to remove the one way clutch? Is it possible to free it up without completely removing it? Thanks for any advice. Larry
 

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What's your VIN?
According to the parts diagram a 2004-2005 400 doesn't have EBS clutches and therefore no one-way bearing. You may have alignment problems or spacers (7) and other parts worn.
To disassemble a drive clutch it has to come off the machine, be secured in a clutch holding fixture, the cover plate and spring removed and then the spider is turned off using a special clutch spider tool. Sometimes heat must be applied to the threads to soften any thread locking agent used during assembly.
Check youtube for videos.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Vin #

I copied the vin # as best I could but it came up as invalid. Looks like the frame might have been broken and welded, poorly, and some of the weld bled onto the vin #. What it looks like is 4XACH2A94B(or H?)78(or maybe 3)6451(or 4). there is no EBS decal anywhere that I can see. Does the center of the non EBS clutch not turn at all except when the whole unit turns? Also, I guess the frame break could cause a mis alignment in the clutches. Is there a way to align clutches without special tools?
 

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If the 10th digit is a B or H then it is either a; B=1981 or 2011 H=1987 or 2017
If you are sure it's a 2004, then the 10th digit would be a 4

The VIN should start 4XACH42A - after the A is the check digit (alpha or numeric) followed by the year '4' - after the year is the assembly plant code (I know Polaris has plant codes of A, B and C) and all the 400's I have worked on had a plant code A so I believe your VIN should be 4XACH42A?4A?????? (the last 6 digits are the production sequence)

Could you attach a pic of the VIN?
 

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The non-EBS clutch is just a solid shaft in the center.
What belt does it have on it?
It needs a 3211077. Non-EBS belts are much looser on the clutches than an EBS belt.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Vin#

If the 10th digit is a B or H then it is either a; B=1981 or 2011 H=1987 or 2017
If you are sure it's a 2004, then the 10th digit would be a 4

The VIN should start 4XACH42A - after the A is the check digit (alpha or numeric) followed by the year '4' - after the year is the assembly plant code (I know Polaris has plant codes of A, B and C) and all the 400's I have worked on had a plant code A so I believe your VIN should be 4XACH42A?4A?????? (the last 6 digits are the production sequence)

Could you attach a pic of the VIN?
new best guess is 4XACH42A94B386454, 11th place sure looks like a B to me. I don't remember how I came to it but I think it is a 2004.5. I plugged that # into a vin search and came up with:

Vehicle Information
Model Name
SPORTSMAN 400 YELLOW '04.5
Model Year
2004
Model Number
A04CH42AR
Purchase Date
3/18/2004
VIN
4XACH42A94B386454
Engine Serial Number
D006360409645
 

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I agree with what you found and I agree with polman, it's not an EBS model - check the belt number - I don't think the frame was repaired, its just a rusty weld - needs cleaned and repainted (IMO, looks like it has been repainted at least once already)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The non-EBS clutch is just a solid shaft in the center.
What belt does it have on it?
It needs a 3211077. Non-EBS belts are much looser on the clutches than an EBS belt.
It had the 077 belt. It was pretty worn and partly mouse chewed. I did not see how the belt could be part of the problem since the wear would make it looser but i bought a new aftermarket belt to be sure and it made no difference. The belt seems quite loose but driven pulley turns when engine is running and shifter is in neutral. I assumed that the driven pulley moving was what was making it shift hard. It shifts easily with engine off. I have the idle at about 1250 RPM. Is that too fast?
 

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Your idle seems about right. Ususally 1100 +/- a couple hundred RPM. You can always turn it down a bit and see if it helps. When was the last time the primary was serviced? The go a long time but do need attention. The weights and weight shafts get worn and need to be replaced after a while. Rollers where they ride can get stuck too.
 

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Idle is a little high for that particular machine. Set it down to around 1050-1150 and see what it does.
You can pretty much "eyeball" the alignment with the cover off by winding it up in N and then let it idle back down while watching down from the top to see were the belt runs in the clutches. Is it toward the inside or to the outside sheave? You add or subtract shim washers from behind the secondary clutch to fine tune were the belt runs (centered is what you want) in the primary.
If the primary sheaves are just too close and it rubs BOTH sheaves, then the primary needs to come apart and shims added to the inside of the primary to get some clearance.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The machine only has 850 miles and 250 hours. The last 11 years it was owned by an elderly couple so I'm sure it was treated gently at least for that time. The sheaves seem to move in and out freely and when engine is off the drive sheaves are fully open. At idle the outside sheave might be in 1/16"-3/32". Can the (main) shaft or the rollers and weight shafts be lubricated with anything without worrying about the belt getting fouled? The relevant question I guess is should the driven pulley be still with engine idling and trans in neutral. I will definitely try turning the idle down a bit more. Taking the drive clutch apart is beyond my pay grade though I think there is enough clearance there.
 

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The machine only has 850 miles and 250 hours. The last 11 years it was owned by an elderly couple so I'm sure it was treated gently at least for that time. The sheaves seem to move in and out freely and when engine is off the drive sheaves are fully open. At idle the outside sheave might be in 1/16"-3/32". Can the (main) shaft or the rollers and weight shafts be lubricated with anything without worrying about the belt getting fouled? The relevant question I guess is should the driven pulley be still with engine idling and trans in neutral. I will definitely try turning the idle down a bit more. Taking the drive clutch apart is beyond my pay grade though I think there is enough clearance there.
If the belt is running toward the outside sheave try taking out one of the shim washers behind the secondary(number 1 in the pic) along with lowering idle speed. It should have 2 or 3 washers behind it. 3 is max. The secondary just slides off the shaft once you remove the bolt. That's a trial and error adjustment... you take one out or add one at a time and then run it to see what you got.
No lube on the clutches.
The driven clutch will usually turn some at idle. When it turns too fast is what causes the problem.
Also, if you have a new belt it takes a little break in time for it to limber up and get worn in smooth. Engagement will also be smoother after it warms some too.
 

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Mileage and hours don't necessarily mean anything as far as clutch alignment/engagement issues. Sometimes brand new machines have problems and need adjusted.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
I turned down the idle and noticed some improvement but not a totally smooth and easy shift. in looking through the service manual it looks as if I would not need any special tools other than the puller to get at the main spring. If that is true I think it would be worth checking the spec on the spring as a possible cause of the outer sheave not separating quite all the way out except when engine is turned off. Once engine has revved enough for outer sheave to go in a bit, it only comes back out within about 3/32" of all the way out. Is my assumption about getting at the spring correct? And thanks to all who have contributed to this thread. Larry
 

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Yeah, you can change the spring and weights without removing the clutch. Just remove the six 10mm bolts holding the drive clutch outer cover on.
I'd first take a washer out from behind the secondary clutch to see if that helps. It costs nothing and takes about 5 minutes to try. No special tools required.
As I said before, a new stiff belt will be make gear selection a little hard and a cold belt is even stiffer. They all shift smoother after the belt is broken in and you should always let the machine warm up before shifting into gear. Its just a good practice to let the machine warm before taking off.
 

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Oh, its VERY rare to find a Polaris that shifts "totally smooth and easy"! That's just not the nature of how a Polaris shifts. Even more so when cold. You shift them with a quick deliberate motion to the desired gear. Not a slow easy push. That's just not how they are designed to be shifted.
 
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