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Discussion Starter #1
ok, I've seen a lot of people say to drink to Koolaid and buy the pure Polaris belts, and stay away from the aftermarket belts. What are you opinions.

it's been VERY wet out here and the last couple times I've ridden the belt has gotten wet. and slipped pretty bad. This slipping was part of the reason for a roll over incident that happened last weekend. I'm pulling the clutch cover off this weekend to remove some weights from the clutch, but since I'm in there and inspecting everything, I might as well take a long look at the belt. I know there is belt dust in the housing because the drain plug is covered in it. So it may be time to replace the belt while I'm in there. The machine has about 2600-2700 miles on what I can only assume is the original belt. so the belt is 7 yrs old now. Plus with the addition of larger tires it is probably time to replace it.
 

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Carlise Hypermax is just as good as OEM (which is not made by Polaris anyway so it could be a Carlise (who knows???)). My original belt is still going strong so whatever Polaris puts on there is a good belt, but I have the Carlise in the cargo box just in case.
 

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I still have the original belt in my 2011 as well. I am careful never to idle in gear as I have learned it will hourglass the belt. I have never had any issues with it. A buddy of mine is going to inspect it this spring, and I may change it out and keep the original as a spare if it is warranted. He believes that my less aggressive driving habits will have been kind to it, but we shall see. I will update.
 

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I am running the Gates on my 850's. I run stock on the two 500's only because I have them and never had to change them.
 

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I believe both my 500 and 700 have the original belts and both machines have just over 2000 hours. Seems to me the OEM belts are pretty decent quality.
 

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I have run them all over the years. In the long run the Polaris belts seem to be a little better over all. However, at sometimes double the price of aftermarket its hard to justify the price sometimes. In some cases the Polaris belts are over $80 and a comparable dayco or gates is $45. In fact I can get the dayco hp2002, which is a direct replacement for Polaris 3211069 for $35 ($50 retail) thorough one of my distributors instead of $80. And they are making them up by $15!
 

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The polaris belts have a great rep for their reliability only neg is price. When OEM has good feed back I stick with OEM. now when OEM is crap I go to the aftermarket for the upgrade. Example of this is last year I did bearings, ball joints, tie-rod ends, and bushings. I went with OEM on everything except I used jccapri bushings because polaris bushings are junk.
 

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ok, I've seen a lot of people say to drink to Koolaid and buy the pure Polaris belts, and stay away from the aftermarket belts. What are you opinions.

it's been VERY wet out here and the last couple times I've ridden the belt has gotten wet. and slipped pretty bad. This slipping was part of the reason for a roll over incident that happened last weekend. I'm pulling the clutch cover off this weekend to remove some weights from the clutch, but since I'm in there and inspecting everything, I might as well take a long look at the belt. I know there is belt dust in the housing because the drain plug is covered in it. So it may be time to replace the belt while I'm in there. The machine has about 2600-2700 miles on what I can only assume is the original belt. so the belt is 7 yrs old now. Plus with the addition of larger tires it is probably time to replace it.
I run the Gates C12 belt, its cords are carbon-fiber and has been great so far! It goes for about $90 shipped. Most will stick with the OEM because it is indeed a great belt as well, just not worth the money. My dealer charges $120 for example. Also there was rumor that Gates makes the Polaris belt, but I have not seen any good evidence of that yet.

I still have the original belt in my 2011 as well. I am careful never to idle in gear as I have learned it will hourglass the belt. I have never had any issues with it. A buddy of mine is going to inspect it this spring, and I may change it out and keep the original as a spare if it is warranted. He believes that my less aggressive driving habits will have been kind to it, but we shall see. I will update.
If you're belt is hourglassing in idle, you have a clutch issue and that problem exists whether its in gear or in park. The primary clutch is always spinning (connected to the crankshaft) and is not affected by what gear you have the bike in at idle. The secondary will always free spin in neutral and park, only in the other gears will it actually try to drive something. So if your belt is moving/rotating at idle in neutral or park, you have a problem.
 

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I'm still running the original on the 800. And I've replaced the belt on the 400, with an OE Polaris belt. I kept the belt I removed (OE Polaris) as a spare/backup.

When I need to replace either one of them I will likely go OE Polaris, or maybe a Gates. On my mahines (Non-XP) the OE vs. Dayco / Gates are within a few dollars of each other locally..... so I may as well go with the "known" belt at replacement time.

Note: On the 400 the OE was @ $55 vs. Gates @ $45-50, priced locally. The OE was available in stock at the Polaris Dealer and the Gates was 1-2 days delivery to local parts store. With the machine tore down in the garage, I gladly payed the $5-10 difference to "wrap the project up today".
 

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Not to completely derail, but I'm curious as to how the belt slipping led to a roll-over. Also, hope everyone's ok (which I'm assuming they are otherwise you prob would have stated it.)
 

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Not to completely derail, but I'm curious as to how the belt slipping led to a roll-over. Also, hope everyone's ok (which I'm assuming they are otherwise you prob would have stated it.)
Happened to one of the can am guys I have ridden with. Basically due to the fact he was running oversized tires with 3,000 miles on the original belt. To compound the situation he haden't done any clutch work to the bike. He was doing a slick moderate hill climb lost momentum due to lack of wheel speed from the belt slipping. Almost made it up then the belt blows apart sending him sliding (brakes locked) backwards into the tree line. Luckily for the tress and the fact that the trail was curved. If it wasn't for those two factors it would have been a lot more damage then a bent rear rack and busted chainsaw mount.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
we were headed up a short steep section. My step son was driving. His first time driving that machine (he has a 110cc kid quad) on the trails. I was on the back. heading up the steep spot the belt slipped and we lost momentum and forward progress. as we started to roll backwards my step son gunned it (instead of letting it roll back and taking a second shot) and the belt caught. and over we went. I acted as a roll cage for him as I'd grabbed onto the handle bars the second we lost momentum. and everything was fine. I attempted the hill climb again and couldn't even get enough momentum/speed going to start up the hill because the belt was slipping so bad. Pulled the clutch cover drain plug and let it drain/dry for a bit. once that was done we were back in business, but this time with my step son riding behind a friend of mine and me on my machine alone.

there were two factors that caused us to go over. 1 the slipping belt. and 2 my fat ass on the back. 1/3 of the weight of the machine up high and on the back on a steep section just isn't a good combination. Had he been going up on his own (granted it was short, like I could stand at the bottom and be taller than it) I doubt it would have gone over.
 

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If you're belt is hourglassing in idle, you have a clutch issue and that problem exists whether its in gear or in park. The primary clutch is always spinning (connected to the crankshaft) and is not affected by what gear you have the bike in at idle. The secondary will always free spin in neutral and park, only in the other gears will it actually try to drive something. So if your belt is moving/rotating at idle in neutral or park, you have a problem.
Wouldn't the primary always have a "grip" on the belt, causing the belt to rotate with the primary all the time? Isn't that why everyone says not to idle in gear? Because the primary is always gripping, therefore spinning the belt?
 

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If you're belt is hourglassing in idle, you have a clutch issue and that problem exists whether its in gear or in park. The primary clutch is always spinning (connected to the crankshaft) and is not affected by what gear you have the bike in at idle. The secondary will always free spin in neutral and park, only in the other gears will it actually try to drive something. So if your belt is moving/rotating at idle in neutral or park, you have a problem.
Wouldn't the primary always have a "grip" on the belt, causing the belt to rotate with the primary all the time? Isn't that why everyone says not to idle in gear? Because the primary is always gripping, therefore spinning the belt?
Nope. The primary should always release the belt at idle. If it were always gripping the belt then that would mean the secondary is always turning, thus making it hard as hell to get into gear ;)

When I installed my QSC clutch kit, due to the weight setup and spring config for mine and my type of riding, the weights were already pushing on the spider at idle, causing the belt to rotate and creating the problems I just mentioned above. I had to add one of their shims just to get it to stop doing that at idle.
 
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