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Poll on A-arm guards

  • Ricochett

    Votes: 23 88.5%
  • Stick stoppers

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Home Made

    Votes: 1 3.8%
  • None

    Votes: 2 7.7%

  • Total voters
    26
  • Poll closed .
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Discussion Starter #1
I am willing to spend the 180+ dollare BUT do I really need them for running on logging roads in the Michigan U.P.?
 

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$180?!

not sure if 13 and 14 are the same but if they are

Ricochet Front & Rear A-Arm Guards Sportsman 500 2010-2011

i know CV boots for mt 850 are $33 from the dealer plus time and aggrivation. nevermind the fact that if you tear one on a long ride and dont realize it, you could really comprimise the joint or, it could fail. i go tthem for insurance. small price to pay to ride all day!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
$180?!

not sure if 13 and 14 are the same but if they are

Ricochet Front & Rear A-Arm Guards Sportsman 500 2010-2011

i know CV boots for mt 850 are $33 from the dealer plus time and aggrivation. nevermind the fact that if you tear one on a long ride and dont realize it, you could really comprimise the joint or, it could fail. i go tthem for insurance. small price to pay to ride all day!
If I want them colored and with shipping at 16 bucks it is over 180 bucks.
 

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if you know someone with a vertical bandsaw and can get the sheets of Ali for cheap, you can build them for WAY cheaper than $180, but they won't be colored. Got my sheet for free. so I spent less than $30 for full skids/guards.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Man I wish I still worked in a metal shop!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just ordered the Ricochet!:cowboy:
 

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I'll tell you the ricochet ones are worth it. Maximum protection.
 

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colored ones are nice but if they do what they are suppose to they will be scratched in no time.
 

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hmmm, I guess if I paid myself for my time it would be cost prohibitive, but man I can't stand spending money to buy something i can build myself. guess thats why I'm the only one that voted for home made.
 

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Would love to have the resources to fabricate my own guards and armor.
 

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Would love to have the resources to fabricate my own guards and armor.
you don't need much, Aluminum can be cut with a jig saw, and you can do the bending with a heavy work bench/table/deck/wall and a large peice of angle Iron to clamp over the metal for bending. If you buy a full sheet of Aluminum you don't need to worry about welding unless you put some crazy bends in the guards. It's nice to have a die grinder with a good bur to clean up the edges, but you can do it all with a file or sand paper if you have too.
 

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Would love to have the resources to fabricate my own guards and armor.
Who give a rats A$$ about A-arm guards...tell me more about your new AVATAR faawrenchbndr!...she is a babe......lol....
 

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I got my Ricochet's anodized orange and I have drove over rocks, trees, through miles of weeds and brush and they still look like new. They can really take some abuse. I had the same fear with the anodizing but I think they look great and can't complain about the durability of the anodizing.

That being said, I would have loved to make my own but I would have needed a large metal break, welder, etc...and it would have taken me several tries to get it right and try to find aluminum plate at a reasonable price. Thorshammer made an awesome set but he had the skills and the equipment.
 

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...... Thorshammer made an awesome set but he had the skills and the equipment.

Don't forget about the free material he received.
 

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...... Thorshammer made an awesome set but he had the skills and the equipment.

Don't forget about the free material he received.
Some people have all the luck!!!!! :fest06: I tried to procure some decent aluminum plate for cheap and had no luck myself. It was going to cost dang near as much as the ricochet guards. Not sure what grade of aluminum the ricochet is but it is some tough stuff. They obviously not only use metal breaks but also use tooling to create some of the radiuses that wrap around the tubing so perfectly. They also TIG weld so there is another thing I don't have access too. Hopefully when I retire I can have all the fun tools.
 

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1, you don't need Tig to weld Aluminum. You can do it with both Mig and Stick, though stick is VERY difficult. and Mig just isn't as pretty.

2. all you need to bend Aluminum is a decently sturdy table top or even just a wall, with a section of large (2"x2"x1/4" or bigger) angle iron clamped over the metal (note; you want the clamps as close to the center of the work as possible). Then bend with either your weight, or a hammer.

3. Nothing I did to mine couldn't be done in a garage at home. with a jig saw and a circular saw. yes a circular saw with just a regular wood blade will cut 1/8" aluminum like going through butter.

4. a full sheet of aluminum should only cost about $150-$200 thats 4'x8' or larger. Still less than a full set of Ricochets, and you could easily do full skids for one, possibly two Atvs if you set up the cuts properly.

5. You don't need to do ANY welding if you've got a full sheet to work with. I was working with scrap so I had to make due with the sizes of pieces I had available to me.

you guys need to stop acting like building something is rocket science. I sat down with a pair of scissors, about 5 sheets or poster board and a roll of tape to come up with the templates for my skids. Remember, Your templates don't need to be cut from a single sheet of poster board. My a arm templates were cut into 3 peices. The bottom, the front, and the back. I than transfered those (still taped together) to a single sheet of paper, but that wasn't needed. You can do it off the taped together templates. Mark where you want the bends, cut out the blanks, dress the cuts (smooth out), and bend away. You don't need a brake because 1, you don't want a tight bed, you want a radiused bend anyway so the method mentioned above is perfectly adiquate for bending skids. If you need more complecated bends to fit your design, a vice can be used to help with those bends. and 2 aluminum is plyable enough to do a lot of your bending by hand. with just body weight. You don't need the mechanical advantage that a break offers you.

I'm nothing special. I sit at a desk and sell insurance all day. It's not like I work with metal on a daily basis. Yes I enjoy working with metal, and have done so for more than 15 yrs, but that doesn't mean this project isn't something even a novice could accomplish to some degree of professionalism.
 

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...... Thorshammer made an awesome set but he had the skills and the equipment.

Don't forget about the free material he received.
Some people have all the luck!!!!! :fest06: I tried to procure some decent aluminum plate for cheap and had no luck myself. It was going to cost dang near as much as the ricochet guards. Not sure what grade of aluminum the ricochet is but it is some tough stuff. They obviously not only use metal breaks but also use tooling to create some of the radiuses that wrap around the tubing so perfectly. They also TIG weld so there is another thing I don't have access too. Hopefully when I retire I can have all the fun tools.
The anodizing process hardens the surface of the aluminum. It's almost like hardfacing a bulldozer blade or wear surface on a piece of machinery. though not as strong as true hardfacing.
 

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That is not entirely true. I do not know if they use hard anno or not. Regular anno is just a chemical process that changes the color of the AL on the surface and actually removes a few microns of material. HARD ANNO adds material and DOES make the surface tougher. But just the surface. More scratch resistant if you will.

Sent from my MB886 using Tapatalk 2
 

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The anodizing process hardens the surface of the aluminum. It's almost like hardfacing a bulldozer blade or wear surface on a piece of machinery. though not as strong as true hardfacing.
That is not entirely true. I do not know if they use hard anno or not. Regular anno is just a chemical process that changes the color of the AL on the surface and actually removes a few microns of material. HARD ANNO adds material and DOES make the surface tougher. But just the surface. More scratch resistant if you will.

Sent from my MB886 using Tapatalk 2
with all due respect, you pretty much just restated exactly what I said. except you stated you weren't sure if they used hard anno on the Ricochet products. Hard faceing on steel is the essentially the same as hard facing anno. You're making the surface harder and more resistant to wear and abrasion. You're adding a small amount of material, and only the surface is getting harder. Not the whole piece of material. You'll also note, that the hard Anno goes into the material the same amount as it adds to the thickness of the material. Similar to hard face welding were the hardfacing rod penetrates into the material comingling with the base metal to create a solid bond. yes, hard facing steel is a much much harder surface than hard anno aluminum, but they essentially do the exact same to the base materal. Create a harder surface to reduce wear on the base material.
 

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Note that generous bends will require more material than a square corner after taping posterboard together. I would suggest using a scrap piece and measuring before/after bending to see how much allowance you will need for bends and where your angle should be clamped to nail the corner where you want it the first time.
 
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