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Discussion Starter #1
I had a torn boot on a rear CV axle on my Wife's 2007. The joint was clicking so I ordered up a new axle and swapped them out. I decided to rebuild the axle just to throw on the parts shelf for a spare in case I have trouble in the future.

I see a lot of questions on here about cv axles, so I thought I would share the experience with the Forum. I was going to do a How To on getting the axle out, but that went horribly awry. So that is a whole other story.

So here is the axle (Ok 2 of them. I still had the last one I changed out too) that I plan to rebuild. The onein the back. You can see how the outer joint has a torn boot, in fact the whole joint is separated from trying to get the axle out of the differential. Also, the inner joint, which was fine, has a torn boot from trying to beat the joint out of the differential. Guess I'll rebuild both joints.



I ordered cv boot kits from Home | ATV Parts Connection - Buy Aftermarket CV Joints, U-Joints, and ATV Boot Kits I have done business there before and never been disappointed. I have his banding tool and find his generic bands to work well.

Since I don't have to worry about reusing bands, I simply cut the existing bands with a dremel tool and a cutoff wheel.



Then I cut the old boot off with some snips. I happened to have my wire cutters handy at the time.



You will notice that the joint I am working on is already separated. Yours will hopefully not come apart as easily. You should have to, after removing the boot, turn the joint to a pretty severe ankgle and pull a bearing out, then rotate the joint another direction to get another bearing out. Working your way around you should be able to remove all 6 bearings and have the joint come apart.

Once apart I clean my parts with Brake Cleaner. I make my own solvent tank by cutting a panel out of a milk jug. I hold the part inside the jig and spray it off. After a few sprays, the extra builds up in the jug and you can actually dip and clean the parts. Using this ghetto solvent tank I was able to clean and rebuild 3 joints with one and a half cans of brake cleaner.



Now that the grease is off, you can see a very important part, the retaining ring on the inner race. (At the tip of the yellow thumb) This retaining ring causes a lot of problems for those who don't know that it is there. If you are trying to change a boot with the joint still in the diff, it is this retaining ring that will let you get the axle shaft out of the joint in order to slide the new boot over the axle.



To get the shaft out of the joint, or the inner race off the shaft, simply spread the tabs on the retaining ring and the shaft will pull easily out. The retaining ring stays inside the groove on the race, not on the shaft. I used needle nose pliers, but snap ring pliers probably work better.



With both joints off the shaft, and the shaft cleaned it is important not to forget which end is which. The outer joint goes on the end that still has the retaining ring on it. This ring is a pressure ony ring. It has no tabs and has to be pulled pretty hard to get it out of the joint. If the retianing ring comes off or is removed, note that the splines on the outer end are shorter and the groove is closer to the end. On the inner joint (plunging joint) side the splines are longer and the groove is closer to the middle of the shaft.



Back to the joints. There is entirely too much grease in the joint (hopefully) to just spray it out with brake cleaner. I use papertowels to scoop out the majority of it. Then I finish cleaning with the brake cleaner in the ghetto solvent tank.



So with all the parts disassembled and cleaned, it's time to inspect for wear, sand off any burrs, and reassemble.



One of the most important things I can say is when you disassemble the joints take note of which end of the outer and inner races faces out of the joint. You can spend hours and a large part of your vocabulary trying to put it back together upside down. This shot shows that the inner race has the divot where the retaining ring sits. That should face outward of course. And the larger end of the outer race, sits down in the cup. The smaller end points outward. This is true for the plunging joint only. I'll show the outer joint later.



To reassemble, once you have the races back together properly, set them in the joint cup. You can then tilt far to one side and set a bearing in through the outside of the outer race. Settle the races back to the bottom of the cup and bring them up so it tilts away from the bearing you just placed in. Insert the opposite bearing.



Work your way around until all 6 bearings are in the race and the races are inside the cup. The last bearing will be very difficult. You may have to experiment with the order you in which you replace the bearings so that the last one will fit in. Getting down to the last bearing and finding that it wont fit is another thing to test your vocabulary. Just take one out, put the other one in and see if you can then fit the new "last one" in. Eventually you will find the right combo. :wtf:



With all the bearings in you have 2 choices. You can fill it with grease and then put the shaft in. Or you can put the shaft in and then coat it with grease. I prefer to put the shaft in first. I have encountered in the past where the races tilt while trying to insert the shaft. Tilted races at the bottom of the cup, coated in grease are hard to see, and messy to realign. On the other hand pushing grease down through the joint is messy as well. No matter which method you choose, be sure to place your new boot over the shaft before inserting the shaft. The shaft should just slide in with a little pushing, no need to spread the tabs on the retaining ring.



Once you have all the grease from the boot kit in/on the joint slide the boot down and seat it over the joint. The cup of the joint has a groove to hold the boot, as does the shaft of the joint. So you should know when it is in the right spot.



Next comes the banding. My instructions and photos will only work for the strap type bands, not the eared or earless type bands. For the strap type wrap the long band around the boot and cup settling it in the groove.



Use your banding tool to pull the strap tight and crimp it over on itself.



Then tap the bent over portion with a hammer to smash it as flat as possible. This is most important with the large band on the outer joint because it goes around and around inside the bearing carrier, or on the front inside the hubstrut. Those places have tight tolerances so you want the fold here to be as flat as possible.



Lastly, bend the little retaining arms over and tap those flat with the hammer as well. Your plunging joint should now be all rebuilt. :fest30:

Now for the outer joint. It requires the exact same process except:
1. The retaining ring does not have tabs. It is a pressure ring and will close itself far enough to come out of the groove in the race IF you pull hard enough. I find it helpful to put the shaft in a vice and tap the joint with a hammer to popit off.
2. The inner race goes with the groove for the retaining ring away from the shaft, down inside the cup of the joint. This ensures the most engagement between the splines of the shaft and the race.
3. The outer race goes with the larger end facing out of the cup. Remember this cup it tapered away from the shaft and so should the outer race be.



A photo of how the races fit back into the cup of the outer joint.



The bearings go in the same as the outer joint. Again with the same frustration about the last bearing.

On this joint the races don't plunge down into the cup so I fill the joint with grease before inserting the shaft. Again ensure you put your boot on the shaft before inserting, or you will be pulling it apart again to put the boot on. (Done that before) The shaft may take a good whack to sit itself into the inner race. I set mine on a hard surface and use a hammer to pound it in. Then seat the boot and band as above. Again, flatten the fold as much as possible. This is the one place where the tolerance of the band is very important.

Now you have disassembled, cleaned, inspected, and rebuilt and entire half shaft. I did two that day. So I guess I rebuilt a whole shaft.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you JJ. Hopefully it will help a few people do it themselves and save some money.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys.
 

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Thanks kicker, great write up!


Rather be riding, instead I'm using Tapatalk
 

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Kicker, a thought, I have rebuilt a few of my RZR CV's and the inner housing holds all the bearings in by a wire spring tha runs along the inner, outer edge. If you know it is there you can locate the two ends, there is a gap, Pry it out with a knife and the whole inner parts pull out. You won't have to assemble and get that last ball in,
John
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the thought JohnPeg. Unfortunately with these axles, the only retaining spring is the one holding the shaft into the inner race. There is no wire spring anywhere else in the joint. I wish it was that simple for me.
 

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yep, the newer axles have the big spring loaded clip holding the balls in. ALso, the newer axles you cant get to the circlip holding the knuckle on...cant get in there to use pliers or snap ring pliers to get it out...I had to beat mine off with a dead blow hammer
 

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Thanks for the thought JohnPeg. Unfortunately with these axles, the only retaining spring is the one holding the shaft into the inner race. There is no wire spring anywhere else in the joint. I wish it was that simple for me.
This write up is exactly what I was looking for. I got the new inboard CV joint rebuild kit for the rear shaft. I was reading the directions for re-installing the race with bearings in the plunging housing. It says the race should be held on with a retaining ring or retained by staking the metal. I didn't see a ring and I'm not sure how to re-stake the metal. I had to rebuild the joint because the bearing race shattered into pieces some how and it was pretty easy removing it from the plunging house. Did you re-stake the metal to hold the bearing in? How far in do you need to insert the bearings back into the plunging house? Since mine was so bad I didn't have a reference point.

Thanks!!

RFW
 

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Discussion Starter #13
RFW,
I have never restaked the metal on the cup of the plunging joint. Not even sure how you would go about that. I would think you would have to take it to a machinist to have that done, at which point you may as well save yourself some money and get a new joint or at least an intact used one. I have tossed a couple of joints out that the staking had become so sloppy that the race just wouldn't stay in the cup. But for the most part, once everything is reassembled, it all fits closely enough that the factory staking still holds. That is the reason that finding the proper order for putting the bearings back in is so frusterating. The staking makes for an almost impossible fit.

As far as how far into the housing do the bearings go, I say all the way. As you add bearings to the race, run the race to the bottom of the cup and back up to put another bearing in. This ensures that things are in line and moving freely. When all 6 bearings are in, just run the race to the bottom of the cup. That makes it nice and stable for putting the shaft back through the inner race.
 

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Thanks for the input. When I finally got the bearings inside the cage and the grease in the plunging joint I ended up find the ring that holds it all in place. Didn't need to re-stake it after all.

Thanks again for the photos, they did help with me putting everything back together!

RFW
 

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I need to replace the outer cv boot on my 01 scrambler 500. How does that knuckle end come off the axle? Once the old boot is cut off it should just pull off?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I've never worked on a scrambler but if the follow the same pattern as the sportsman then there is just a tension circlip on the end of the axle shaft. It should just pop off it I've often had to put the axle in a vice and hit the knuckle with a hammer to pop it. Or use a pickle fork and hammer.
 

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Where can you get replacement outer race and bearings for a 2012 sportsman 850? that is all that broke and destroyed. the inner race is just fine. all i need to make these axles good again in the outer race and bearings. where can i get these?
 

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Don't bother replacing individual parts. Buy some better axles. The cost will be likely the same when all is said and done.
 

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I already have done that, but i want to fix these that are laying around collecting dust to have incase one of these have to be sent off for warranty work or have to be fixed. so i can still ride in the mean time.
 
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