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Discussion Starter #1
This is an in house trick: We don't use ether starting fluid in the service dept. - it's too flammable - we use contact cleaner as starting fluid - there are cans of contact cleaner every where; carb bench, parts washing area, on or near every lift and several on every work bench. It's ordered by the case and has multiple uses.

Not all contact cleaner is suitable for starting fluid - you have to experiment to find what works and what does not work as well. Currently we have two favorites; #1 is PJ1 Pro contact cleaner product number 40-3 - #2 is BikeMaster part number 531850. We tried a couple of other brands like CRC and Johnsen's from Big R Farm Store and decided to stay with #1 and #2.
 

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Thanks for the information on which cleaners work best.

If you want a good laugh go watch a video on YouTube made by ziptienbiasplies the guy is hilarious. Warning though there will be lots of swearing and derogatory jokes and weird Canadian words. But if you can get over the vulgarity it's actually pretty funny. Search 'ziptiesnbiasplies ether vs hairspray' it should be the first result on youtube.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The only starting fluid I'll ever use is gas. Ether or any other starting fluid never comes near my vehicles.
That's fine - ever used propane to start an engine? Just turn a propane torch without lighting it and stick it in the air filter intake. If the engine is suffering a 'no fuel' starting problem, the propane will allow the engine to start and accelerate some, but the amount of propane is insufficient to allow normal acceleration, but it will verify the absence of fuel as the starting issue.
 

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That's fine - ever used propane to start an engine? Just turn a propane torch without lighting it and stick it in the air filter intake. If the engine is suffering a 'no fuel' starting problem, the propane will allow the engine to start and accelerate some, but the amount of propane is insufficient to allow normal acceleration, but it will verify the absence of fuel as the starting issue.
I only use gas. I just don't like using any spray type starting fluids. I know propane is supposed to be safer, but I just don't see the need. I have a small oil squirt can that I put gas in when I need it.
 

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I only use gas. I just don't like using any spray type starting fluids. I know propane is supposed to be safer, but I just don't see the need. I have a small oil squirt can that I put gas in when I need it.
We use the spray fluids for a few reasons - higher volatility (vaporizes faster and better at cold temperatures), they are less likely to flood the engine and they are safer than gasoline in the case of a spill. Higher volatility fluids may ignite easier, but it's a flash and it's gone. Gasoline just lays there, vaporizing and the fire lasts longer igniting other less volatile materials in the vicinity.

Ignite a pool of gasoline and if you look at it closely you will see the flame is above the liquid - it's only the vapor (aromatics in the gasoline) that burns, but the flame heats the liquid which increases the rate of vaporization which intensifies the flame which increases the vaporization. This means as the pool of gasoline is heated, the flame becomes more intense until the rate of vaporization equals the rate of consumption or until the pool of gas is consumed. If the pool of gas is a metal container, the flame will heat the container. When the gasoline reaches it's boiling point and the aromatics are being released at the maximum rate, the gasoline fueled fire erupts violently until all the gasoline is consumed.

The spray fluids are convenient and readily available in the shop. For starting an engine in sub-zero temperatures, ether is a better choice than contact cleaner and used properly will not damage an engine. Don't spray half a can of either into the air filter box and then try to start the engine. Start cranking the engine and with the engine spinning over, spray the starting fluid into the intake - spray in bursts, do not spray continuously and only spray enough to keep the engine running until it will run without additional high volatility fuel.

We used to use ether to 'blow' tubeless ATV tires onto the rims, but we now have better less risky methods to seat the beads of ATV tires.

This was only a TIP, not a command. If using gasoline works for you, by all means continue to use it, but if you experience a gasoline fueled fire on or around the engine, you might consider this TIP.
 

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We use the spray fluids for a few reasons - higher volatility (vaporizes faster and better at cold temperatures), they are less likely to flood the engine and they are safer than gasoline in the case of a spill. Higher volatility fluids may ignite easier, but it's a flash and it's gone. Gasoline just lays there, vaporizing and the fire lasts longer igniting other less volatile materials in the vicinity.

Ignite a pool of gasoline and if you look at it closely you will see the flame is above the liquid - it's only the vapor (aromatics in the gasoline) that burns, but the flame heats the liquid which increases the rate of vaporization which intensifies the flame which increases the vaporization. This means as the pool of gasoline is heated, the flame becomes more intense until the rate of vaporization equals the rate of consumption or until the pool of gas is consumed. If the pool of gas is a metal container, the flame will heat the container. When the gasoline reaches it's boiling point and the aromatics are being released at the maximum rate, the gasoline fueled fire erupts violently until all the gasoline is consumed.

The spray fluids are convenient and readily available in the shop. For starting an engine in sub-zero temperatures, ether is a better choice than contact cleaner and used properly will not damage an engine. Don't spray half a can of either into the air filter box and then try to start the engine. Start cranking the engine and with the engine spinning over, spray the starting fluid into the intake - spray in bursts, do not spray continuously and only spray enough to keep the engine running until it will run without additional high volatility fuel.

We used to use ether to 'blow' tubeless ATV tires onto the rims, but we now have better less risky methods to seat the beads of ATV tires.

This was only a TIP, not a command. If using gasoline works for you, by all means continue to use it, but if you experience a gasoline fueled fire on or around the engine, you might consider this TIP.
I just figure if it won't run on gasoline from the carb or a little in the plug hole then I need to fix something. I'm not worried about a spill because I use a sealed squirt can. It's just what I've been doing for 40+ years and as you said, just an opinion. We all have them.
 

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Don't spray half a can of either into the air filter box and then try to start the engine. Start cranking the engine and with the engine spinning over, spray the starting fluid into the intake - spray in bursts, do not spray continuously and only spray enough to keep the engine running until it will run without additional high volatility fuel.
OK, maybe don't watch ziptiesnbiasplies vidyas then, if people following proper procedure is important to you. I'm pretty sure he's never followed either of those in his life.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I watched several ziptiesnbiasplies vids - it's for entertainment only and entertain he does pretty well.
 

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Ziptiesnbiasplies is a pretty good product tester. I can't believe that old IDI is still alive.
 
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