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Discussion Starter #1
Although I do mostly gravel or dirt road driving with my 570 Touring, there is the odd time I head off into the bush where clearance can be an issue.

What is the benefit of Aluminum bottom plates VS Plastic plates?
I'm assuming the plastic variation are quite hard so whats the real difference?

I'm fairly handy so am curious if these can be mounted in the garage (by me) or does it have to be a service person?
 

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Either one will work for you. I've had both, and they both do their job well. I'm using the HDPE plastic skids plates now, from Iron Baltic, just to your south across the Baltic Sea. I really like their 100% coverage and protection on the bottom side, vs the not as good of coverage you get with other brand aluminum skids. IB does offer an aluminum skid with the same coverage as their HDPE which I wouldn't mind trying sometime as well. Maybe for the wife's 570 T.
The aluminum will deform the more it gets used, which makes it difficult to put back on if you have to remove it, and you get aluminum slivers as well. The aluminum is a little thinner, so you maybe save 1/4" of ground clearance.
So far the HDPE is working as well as expected, and I have no complaints. My plates always get a work out, and I have yet to have any damage to my atv. I definitely recommend them, but any skid plates are better than no skid plates. You can install them yourself with no problem. They just take a little time.



 

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if you're handy you can make your own at a fraction of the cost of buying aluminium plates. and you can get all the coverage you desire by doing them yourself. And it can be done with the basic tools that most people should have. Jig saw, hammer, drill, and some clamps. Below is a link to my build. We had to weld mine because the aluminum I was using was scrap that was given to me. but if you buy a full sheet of Aluminum, you won't need to do that. I'd put my skid plates up for comparison to Ricochet any day of the week.

http://www.polarisatvforums.com/forums/atv-visual-body-modifications/39166-home-made-skid-plates.html
 

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Those are some awesome skids you built. However, in the 8 months it took for you to figure it out, and then build them, I would have torn the bottom side off of my machine. :biglaugh: Great job!
 
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lol. nothing happens quickly when there are a wife and kids eating up your time. the actual build took two nights.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thanks for the replies!!

will look into the plastic IB plates for sure, thanks!
and impressed they hold up to the punishment!
doubt i'll ever 'punish' them but like you said, better to have then to not have.
should be a factory install from the beginning i think.

looked at the plans to build my own but i'm afraid the time involved to doing this just once would be too much (family man, house, training blah blah blah).

thanks again!!
 

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to each their own. it's the family, house, job, etc. that caused the delay in production but total build time was less than 6 hrs total.
 

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Aluminum is very good and can be hammered out straight again if you bang it up over the years. It's much more rigid than the plastics. It makes for the best a-arm guards because it don't flex like plastics. The vertical part in the front will deflect much more while plastic will let let's say a piece of sharp wood or rebar hit it, bend it back, and pass on over. It also acts as a safety net if you get high centered on off-camber hills. Imagine having a steep hill on your side in that situation. You don't want to slide over too far to the side and go over the hill. I've seen it. We also offer color anodizing on our aluminum.

HDPE is more prone to cracking in the corners if you have cold winters. It is also much softer than UHMW which makes it score much easier. We won't use HDPE for these reasons. While HDPE may hold up well for some, we'd rather spend almost 10 times more for the UHMW material because it's just that much better. HDPE is a great choice to make your own skids out of though if you are on a budget. It's $50 for a 4x8 sheet. How some companies can get the prices they do for skids made out of HDPE is beyond me.

UHMW is the top choice of plastics because it is very hard to score and absorbs impacts better than any other plastic.

We have aluminum for your Polaris ATVs now and will soon be offering (popular Polaris ATV models) our hybrid sets for the ultimate protection. They consist of aluminum with an UHMW overlay that is fastened to the aluminum centers and floorboards. We will offer those in sets and also the UHMW overlay as an add-on for those if you who already have Ricochet skids. Our hybrid sets are the best of both worlds. No other skids will absorb impact as well.

Here is the hybrid set we just finished for the Yamaha Grizzly:
 

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Aluminum is very good and can be hammered out straight again if you bang it up over the years. It's much more rigid than the plastics. It makes for the best a-arm guards because it don't flex like plastics. The vertical part in the front will deflect much more while plastic will let let's say a piece of sharp wood or rebar hit it, bend it back, and pass on over. It also acts as a safety net if you get high centered on off-camber hills. Imagine having a steep hill on your side in that situation. You don't want to slide over too far to the side and go over the hill. I've seen it. We also offer color anodizing on our aluminum.


UHMW is the top choice of plastics because it is very hard to score and absorbs impacts better than any other plastic.

We have aluminum for your Polaris ATVs now and will soon be offering (popular Polaris ATV models) our hybrid sets for the ultimate protection. They consist of aluminum with an UHMW overlay that is fastened to the aluminum centers and floorboards. We will offer those in sets and also the UHMW overlay as an add-on for those if you who already have Ricochet skids. Our hybrid sets are the best of both worlds. No other skids will absorb impact as well.
I've highlighted a couple of things just so my question will make sense. What is the purpose of the hybrid, and where is the advantage over just aluminum or just plastic? Seems to contradict a couple things.
I also don't buy into the whole cracking when cold theory either, based on personal experience, but no need to get that argument started. Just want to know, why a hybrid?
 
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We've been selling hybrid sets on UTVs for a while now. They outsell our full UHMW by far and for good reason. UHMW has superior impact absorbing capabilities. Don't take my word for it, Google it up. UHMW and the far cheaper HDPE both flex. Having the aluminum behind (center skids) it eliminates that. Also, the way the UHMW overlays mount to the aluminum via multiple mounting points allows for a small bit of lateral shift upon impact. This ever so slight shift or side to side movement dampens the hit even more.

Most of the stuff that hangs us up is on the centers or floorboards while moving forward. Having aluminum on the outsides and a-arm guards come more into play when your riding off-camber technical stuff. Sometimes you can't afford to just slide sideways off a rock to far causing you to go just far enough to the downhill side of a tight trail where you start to tip. I have seen 4 quads tip and roll down the hills from this...three of which were running full plastic. Most without the full plastic made it right by. The aluminum a-arm guards also come into play when anything long and sharp hits the front it. You have less chance of the object bending that vertical part resulting in it sliding up and over and damaging something. Even worse...getting a piece of wood or rebar stuck in your leg or something.

While these things may seem like little things to you, they are not to us. There are more of our skids out there than any other brand. We've been doing it since 1976. Our main priorities are offering you the best protection and durability at the best price. We gather tons of customer feedback and factor that into all of our decisions. We started doing long term tests on HDPE and UHMW long before and even after many other companies started selling them. We just don't dive into something. We owe it to our customers to not cheap out on materials and make sure that they get the most for their hard earned money. We're located in Utah and give great shipping deals to our customers. We also offer color anodizing for even more bling bling.

There will be some reviews out on these Grizzly sets soon. We just introduced them. I promise you...there is no better protection than our hybrid sets for all around and also technical riding.

I wish you the best with your skids. Good times and happy riding.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
all good info to read.
if and when i buy, it will have to be locally here in sweden and at the moment am leaning towards the Iron Baltic set of plastic under protection.
 

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all good info to read.
if and when i buy, it will have to be locally here in sweden and at the moment am leaning towards the Iron Baltic set of plastic under protection.
what did you end up getting?

Ricochet doesn't make hybrid for my Touring so I am looking at options...and didn't think a new thread was warranted.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I haven't bought any yet as we have not been home much the party summers so not too much touring either :(
Hopefully this summer can get back into it more...
 
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