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About 6 months ago I replaced the fuel pump and regulator in my 2007 sportsman 700. At that time I didn't notice and corrosion. After replacing everything worked great. I drive it fairly regularly but it might have sat for a few weeks 1 or 2 times. I have used about 90% ethanol gas since. A few days ago it wouldn't start and I realized the fuel filter was clogged (also new). I took out the fuel pump again and noticed that this time everything was pretty severely corroded.
So I have 2 questions. First what would cause this?
Second, what should I use to clean the fuel pump parts?
Thanks
 

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I take it the corrosion was inside the fuel tank?

If you are using 90% ethanol fuel, the fuel would be responsible for the corrosion. If the fuel is 10% ethanol, then water absorbed by the alcohol is responsible for the corrosion, but the corrosion is caused by oxygen. If the fuel tank was not full, then atmospheric moisture probably condensed on the exposed ferrous parts and caused the corrosion. Bottom line is oxygen caused the corrosion whether carried in by the atmosphere or water. Air, water and alcohol all contain oxygen (pure gas (C8H18) does not contain oxygen but, combustion is the process of combining 2 molecules
of gasoline C8H18 with 25 O2 molecules results in the production of 16 molecules of CO2 and 18 molecules of H2O (carbon dioxide and water) - today's gasoline is not a pure hydrocarbon, but a mixture of hydrocarbons, aromatics, oxidizers, dyes, lubricants, detergents, anti-foaming agents, anti-corrosives and other compounds so the byproducts of combustion include carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons, carbon and other components unknown to me.

To clean the corrosion, use a mild acid like vinegar (acetic acid), diluted muriatic acid (toilet bowl cleaner) or electrolysis.

To prevent corrosion from reoccurring - keep the fuel tank full of non-oxygenated fuel or mix a small amount of two stroke oil (100:1 ratio is about right) with the fuel so when the fuel level is low, exposed metal parts have a film of oil on them to retard oxidation. If using ethanol blended fuel use an oil that will mix with alcohol (some synthetics and most vegetable oils) (castor bean oil is a vegetable oil) - the downside of vegetable oil? It can support the growth of mold - even when mixed with alcohol - byproducts of mold growth will corrode ferrous and non-ferrous metals.

Bottom line - keep the tank full of non-ethanol fuel and prevent atmospheric air from entering the tank while in storage.

Note: sloshing fuel will wash the parts clean and remove rust over time with continuous operation.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I take it the corrosion was inside the fuel tank?

If you are using 90% ethanol fuel, the fuel would be responsible for the corrosion. If the fuel is 10% ethanol, then water absorbed by the alcohol is responsible for the corrosion, but the corrosion is caused by oxygen. If the fuel tank was not full, then atmospheric moisture probably condensed on the exposed ferrous parts and caused the corrosion. Bottom line is oxygen caused the corrosion whether carried in by the atmosphere or water. Air, water and alcohol all contain oxygen (pure gas (C8H18) does not contain oxygen but, combustion is the process of combining 2 molecules
of gasoline C8H18 with 25 O2 molecules results in the production of 16 molecules of CO2 and 18 molecules of H2O (carbon dioxide and water) - today's gasoline is not a pure hydrocarbon, but a mixture of hydrocarbons, aromatics, oxidizers, dyes, lubricants, detergents, anti-foaming agents, anti-corrosives and other compounds so the byproducts of combustion include carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons, carbon and other components unknown to me.

To clean the corrosion, use a mild acid like vinegar (acetic acid), diluted muriatic acid (toilet bowl cleaner) or electrolysis.

To prevent corrosion from reoccurring - keep the fuel tank full of non-oxygenated fuel or mix a small amount of two stroke oil (100:1 ratio is about right) with the fuel so when the fuel level is low, exposed metal parts have a film of oil on them to retard oxidation. If using ethanol blended fuel use an oil that will mix with alcohol (some synthetics and most vegetable oils) (castor bean oil is a vegetable oil) - the downside of vegetable oil? It can support the growth of mold - even when mixed with alcohol - byproducts of mold growth will corrode ferrous and non-ferrous metals.

Bottom line - keep the tank full of non-ethanol fuel and prevent atmospheric air from entering the tank while in storage.

Note: sloshing fuel will wash the parts clean and remove rust over time with continuous operation.
Thank you for the info, very helpful. I must have worded it wrong, but I meant to say that I use ethanol free gas 90% of time.
I will follow instructions to remove corrosion.
 
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