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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2018 570 touring. I last used the machine several weeks ago. Its been sitting in the garage since - have never had any issues like this before, and no indication of any sort of drivetrain problems.

Went to take it out of the garage, put it in reverse and it wouldn't move..almost like the parking brake is on, but that's not the case. When giving it a little throttle, there is some sort of noise which sounds like its coming from the rear axle area. The machine abruptly stops at that point.

I put it in H/L/R - all do the same thing. 2WD or 4WD makes no difference. With the rear wheels off of the ground, in any gear including neutral, the rear wheels wont spin freely at all.

I drained the transmission fluid. There was a very small (i would say normal) amount of very fine metal shavings on the plug. The fluid looks brand new - absolutely no metal in it whatsoever. I last changed it last winter - not too many miles/hours on it since then.

I'm kind of at a loss here as it was totally fine before parking it. All I did was try to back it out of the garage and I've got nothing. It revs freely, seems to run fine, just won't move at all.

Could it be clutch/belt related if it won't spin even in neutral? Where should I begin to look?
 

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The mice have chewed and devoured your belt.
 

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Are the rears wheels locked or they do rotate by hand?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Are the rears wheels locked or they do rotate by hand?
They are locked. They move a couple inches around and then stop. Won't rotate at all by hand.

If it were belt/clutch related, wouldn't the wheels spin freely in neutral by hand?
 

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They are locked. They move a couple inches around and then stop. Won't rotate at all by hand.

If it were belt/clutch related, wouldn't the wheels spin freely in neutral by hand?
Yes the wheels should rotate freely in neutral and with some drag when in gear

Are you certain the brakes are not frozen for some reason? Stuck master cylinder plunger or foot brake pedal not moving on it's pivot?
 

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Did you have the park brake locked while it was sitting?
I've seen a lot of people do that. Not good to leave it sitting for long periods that way.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
So it turned out to be a rear wheel bearing that was seized up. Only ~650 miles on the machine. Got a set of greasers for them and will be using them periodically if that's all the longer they'll last.

Pretty interesting since the bearing had never made any sort of noise indicating failure. I had a fun time getting this one out.

143017
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143019
 

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How in the he!! does Polaris expect that bearing to survive when they ship them out dry?
 
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The bit of metal shavings on drain plug is normal. So are ungreased wheel bearings from factory! Not your fault but you HAVE to buy a wheel bearing greaser. Edit: I see you did 😃
 

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19’ 850SP Camo. MtAiry Maryland
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I hope you’re going to go ahead and replace all 4. It appears you’ve spent some time in the mud, so all of them are on their way out. And please use a good marine grease like Lucas
 

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How in the he!! does Polaris expect that bearing to survive when they ship them out dry?
Agreed, but it appears all brand bearings, new, have very little grease in them.
 

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The amount of grease on a bearing from the manufacturer is not for lubrication - it's for protection to prevent the bearing from rusting prior to installation.

Polaris is not the only manufacturer that has eliminated preparation of bearings and other necessary lubrication during assembly. Typically, sealed bearings are 'permanently' lubricated at the time of manufacture. Take the seals off a sealed bearing and you will discover how much grease the college educated idiots have determined is necessary for lifetime lubrication. They are not concerned with your lifetime or even the vehicle's lifetime - their concern is the bearing's lifetime and the bearing's lifetime is short in comparison to humans and the vehicle.

When I got my 97 Honda XR250R to race in hare scrambles, I bought it from a guy who put less than 100 miles on it and could not deal with learning how to start it. That bike had a specific procedure for starting and it was different for cold vs hot. Anyway, after the first season, the steering head bearings went bad from RUST! That's was when I found out that Honda did not put grease on the bearings during assembly at the factory. I replaced the bearings prior to 1999 and packed them with waterproof wheel bearing grease. At the same time, I disassembled the bike and proceeded to wash the factory grease out of all the bearings that were not sealed and re-lubed all the bearings with waterproof grease. I sold the bike in 04 to a friend of mine who eventually sold it to his son and his son's son is now riding it. None of the bearings have needed replacement since my 'preventative' maintenance, but every few years they bring the bike back to me for preventative maintenance.

When I got my NEW 04 CRF250X, I uncrated it, disassembled it, lubed all the bearings, assembled it making certain modifications to improve reliability and race environment protection. I am still riding that bike and have not had any bearing failures, but I take it apart at the end of the regular race season, wash out the old grease and if there is no obvious damage or excessive wear, re-grease them prior to assembly, but I detect any damage or wear, a new bearing an or pivot shaft or bushing is replaced as a matter of prevention. In 16 years of riding and racing, the suspension on that bike is more precise than the suspension on a brand new unit.

The best thing you can do for a NEW vehicle is to have it 'serviced' before your first excursion with it. Is is either YOU or the DEALER who is the final quality control of a new vehicle.
 

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19’ 850SP Camo. MtAiry Maryland
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The amount of grease on a bearing from the manufacturer is not for lubrication - it's for protection to prevent the bearing from rusting prior to installation.

Polaris is not the only manufacturer that has eliminated preparation of bearings and other necessary lubrication during assembly. Typically, sealed bearings are 'permanently' lubricated at the time of manufacture. Take the seals off a sealed bearing and you will discover how much grease the college educated idiots have determined is necessary for lifetime lubrication. They are not concerned with your lifetime or even the vehicle's lifetime - their concern is the bearing's lifetime and the bearing's lifetime is short in comparison to humans and the vehicle.

When I got my 97 Honda XR250R to race in hare scrambles, I bought it from a guy who put less than 100 miles on it and could not deal with learning how to start it. That bike had a specific procedure for starting and it was different for cold vs hot. Anyway, after the first season, the steering head bearings went bad from RUST! That's was when I found out that Honda did not put grease on the bearings during assembly at the factory. I replaced the bearings prior to 1999 and packed them with waterproof wheel bearing grease. At the same time, I disassembled the bike and proceeded to wash the factory grease out of all the bearings that were not sealed and re-lubed all the bearings with waterproof grease. I sold the bike in 04 to a friend of mine who eventually sold it to his son and his son's son is now riding it. None of the bearings have needed replacement since my 'preventative' maintenance, but every few years they bring the bike back to me for preventative maintenance.

When I got my NEW 04 CRF250X, I uncrated it, disassembled it, lubed all the bearings, assembled it making certain modifications to improve reliability and race environment protection. I am still riding that bike and have not had any bearing failures, but I take it apart at the end of the regular race season, wash out the old grease and if there is no obvious damage or excessive wear, re-grease them prior to assembly, but I detect any damage or wear, a new bearing an or pivot shaft or bushing is replaced as a matter of prevention. In 16 years of riding and racing, the suspension on that bike is more precise than the suspension on a brand new unit.

The best thing you can do for a NEW vehicle is to have it 'serviced' before your first excursion with it. Is is either YOU or the DEALER who is the final quality control of a new vehicle.
Words to live by for sure. I do appreciate all the things the factory workers get right, but things get missed. My 850 came with a couple of grease points empty, had I not caught that quickly it could’ve led to expensive repairs.
 

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OP also anti-sieze the hub. Another factory oversight, possibly. It was funny I greased the 570 at the first complete service the left hubs had anti-sieze and hubs slide right out and the right side was dry and on one of the wheels the race popped out. No biggy as the bearing was in good shape and I just reinstalled it. But hey that's all part of it.
 
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OP also anti-sieze the hub. Another factory oversight, possibly. It was funny I greased the 570 at the first complete service the left hubs had anti-sieze and hubs slide right out and the right side was dry and on one of the wheels the race popped out. No biggy as the bearing was in good shape and I just reinstalled it. But hey that's all part of it.
Same for me^^^ anti-seize only 1 side!
 
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