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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2022 1000xp, how much power does the stator have to run what accessories at one time?? I have a rigid 10" sr light bar, Polaris hand and thumb warmers, also plan on plugging in my phone and or GPS. Can I run all three of these at once? Would I have to shut them off if I were to user the winch? Thought of doing colored LED lights underneath at some point, in laymens terms where is max before I would need a bigger stator or be concerned about frying something because I have too much sh*t plugged in? I am not much of a mechanic, more of a wrench turner and fluid change guy. Electrical to me mine as well be outer space.
Going on week #4 it has been build sitting at the factory waiting for a delivery truck :mad:
 

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No problem with them 3 on at the same time
 

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Well, it has a 32 amp rectifier which equates to about 384 watts of available power - the factory head lights are 50 watts each, the tail light is .26 watt, the brake light is intermittent and a battery consumes appx 20 watts when charging the battery leaving about 200 watts for heated grips, extra lights, the winch and other junk. Since the winch is intermittent, it is not much of a consideration unless it is used frequently (like raising and lowering a snow blade). If the winch is being used frequently for 1/2 hour, it will require about 4 hours of continuous engine operation for the battery to fully recharge. Even if the engine is running above 3000 RPM the electrical accessories are drawing off the off the battery more so than the charging system. ATV batteries need to be charged with a Battery Tender for up to 10 hours (or until fully charged) after each heavy draw usage.

The alternator is rated at 630 peak watts at 5000 RPM - the alternator is 3 phase AC and the vehicle electrical system is single phase DC (all DC circuits are single phase). 630 watts peak is about 500 watts continuous and AC watts drop when rectified into DC. If the rectifier is operating at peak output (which it rarely does) you have sufficient capacity for about about 6 to 10 hours of operation with typical varying engine RPM with all DC accessories in operation before the battery voltage drops low enough for the ignition to quit making spark.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, it has a 32 amp rectifier which equates to about 384 watts of available power - the factory head lights are 50 watts each, the tail light is .26 watt, the brake light is intermittent and a battery consumes appx 20 watts when charging the battery leaving about 200 watts for heated grips, extra lights, the winch and other junk. Since the winch is intermittent, it is not much of a consideration unless it is used frequently (like raising and lowering a snow blade). If the winch is being used frequently for 1/2 hour, it will require about 4 hours of continuous engine operation for the battery to fully recharge. Even if the engine is running above 3000 RPM the electrical accessories are drawing off the off the battery more so than the charging system. ATV batteries need to be charged with a Battery Tender for up to 10 hours (or until fully charged) after each heavy draw usage.

The alternator is rated at 630 peak watts at 5000 RPM - the alternator is 3 phase AC and the vehicle electrical system is single phase DC (all DC circuits are single phase). 630 watts peak is about 500 watts continuous and AC watts drop when rectified into DC. If the rectifier is operating at peak output (which it rarely does) you have sufficient capacity for about about 6 to 10 hours of operation with typical varying engine RPM with all DC accessories in operation before the battery voltage drops low enough for the ignition to quit making spark.
:oops: could you be a little more specific :LOL: great info, Thanks!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
:oops: could you be a little more specific :LOL: great info, Thanks!!!
Well, it has a 32 amp rectifier which equates to about 384 watts of available power - the factory head lights are 50 watts each, the tail light is .26 watt, the brake light is intermittent and a battery consumes appx 20 watts when charging the battery leaving about 200 watts for heated grips, extra lights, the winch and other junk. Since the winch is intermittent, it is not much of a consideration unless it is used frequently (like raising and lowering a snow blade). If the winch is being used frequently for 1/2 hour, it will require about 4 hours of continuous engine operation for the battery to fully recharge. Even if the engine is running above 3000 RPM the electrical accessories are drawing off the off the battery more so than the charging system. ATV batteries need to be charged with a Battery Tender for up to 10 hours (or until fully charged) after each heavy draw usage.

The alternator is rated at 630 peak watts at 5000 RPM - the alternator is 3 phase AC and the vehicle electrical system is single phase DC (all DC circuits are single phase). 630 watts peak is about 500 watts continuous and AC watts drop when rectified into DC. If the rectifier is operating at peak output (which it rarely does) you have sufficient capacity for about about 6 to 10 hours of operation with typical varying engine RPM with all DC accessories in operation before the battery voltage drops low enough for the ignition to quit making spark.
Sometimes my quad will sit unused for a few months at a time. Do you recommend I leave a battery tender on it, or disconnect it and bring it inside?
 

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Why would you want to bring the battery inside; because it's warmer? The charge on a battery decays naturally. It discharges more slowly when cold than warm, so a cold battery need recharging less often than a warm battery, but as you warm a battery, the chemical reaction that occurs during charging is activated by the heat. Warm a battery sufficiently and it will start charging in an uncontrolled chemical reaction (run away charging) and could explode or burst in to flames (neither is desirable).

Best way to store a battery in in a cool (45 degrees F is almost ideal) dry place. A conventional flooded cell lead acid battery in storage should be charged at no more than 1.5 amps until fully charged about every 30 days. An AGM battery stored under the same conditions only need to be recharged about every 60 days in the same fashion. A Battery Tender (registered trademark) will charge at 1.25 amps or less for the initial charge period (to about 80% of full charge), switch to (to the best of my knowledge) to appx. 0.25 amps until the battery is fully charged and then switch into a 'float' state of 0.1 amp and remain there. It has to charge continuously in order to monitor the state of charge. Well 0.1 amp over a long enough period of time will damage a battery (overcharge it). It is best if the Tender is turned off or disconnected for periods longer than it is connected. Cycling through the charging cycle is better for the battery than a continuous low current charge. I recommend connecting a Battery Tender (an automatic charger with less than 1.25 amp output) and control it with an outlet timer or use a solar charger. Only charge the battery until fully charged and turn off the charger repeating the cycle each day. A solar charger only charges during periods of sufficient sunlight so cycling is automatic.
 

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I've had excellent luck with BatteryMinder chargers over the years. They have a temperature sensor on them, so they'll charge based on that temp reading - higher charge rate for cold, and lower for hot. That makes a WORLD of difference! I've brought batteries back from what I thought was the point of no return with both of mine countless times. Pretty amazing units. They're supposed to use "pulse" technology that's supposed to break down sulfation. Not sure if it's that or just the sensor, but if you leave it on for a couple weeks on a completely spanked battery, 9 times out of 10, you can reuse the battery normally again. I was able to get an extra year out of the OE battery in my '07 Silverado thanks to it. Not possible with any other charger. They also have specific AGM and Odyssey PLT settings, too. A bit pricey, but the first battery you save will pay for it these days.
 
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