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Discussion Starter #1
HISTORY
Sorry if this ends up a bit long. Just trying to describe the history of my bike.

2013 Sportsman 500. Only aftermarket electrical accessory is a venom winch was installed immediately after purchasing. The factory battery worked fine from 2013 to 2017. When it quit working last year I attributed it to the batteries age and reached it. I bought an autolight AGM battery it worked okay throughout the summer of 2017 but by spring 2018 it had also given up the ghost. I kept the quad on a battery tender over that winter. After repeated charging it would read 11.5V but would rise to about 14.3V while the quad was running which made me believe the stator was working properly.

Thinking that the Autolight AGM battery was crap I purchased a Yuasa from Summit last spring. It too worked fine over the summer of 2018. This spring I've had the same problems I had with the AGM battery. Is the quad sits more than a day or two without being ran the battery will die.

CURRENT DAY.
I put my charger on the battery overnight. Tested the voltage today and it was 12.5V. I then started the quad and the voltage measured 14.3V and held consistant.

Next I pulled the negative terminal off the battery and checked for parasitic current draw. I get nothing measurable on the 200mA setting which is as low as mine goes.

I then pulled the reg/rec from the quad to bench test. I performed a diode test with the following results:
Forward bias, wire 1, 0.389v
Forward bias, wire 2, 0.390v
Forward bias, wire 3, 0.389v
Reverse bias, wire 1, OL
Reverse bias, wire 2, OL
Reverse bias, wire 3, 1.350v for a split second then OL.

The split second reading across the third wire is consistent every time. I've never seen this happen on a diode test. It's the only wire it happens on.

Does this indicate a faulty Regulator?

I'm kind of at wits end. With no parasitic draws obvious I'm not sure where to go next other than replace the red. But considering the 3 forward readings were all consistent it make me wonder.
 

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I presume you are measuring ohms of resistance through the diode and not avalanche voltage?

The momentary reading on one diode may have to do with the capacitor(s) in the voltage regulator section of the unit.

I suggest you charge the battery and leave it disconnected from the vehicle for a couple of days and recheck it.

When you reference a 'battery tender', what brand of 'tender' are you using and what's the rated amp outputs of the various stages of charge?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I presume you are measuring ohms of resistance through the diode and not avalanche voltage?

The momentary reading on one diode may have to do with the capacitor(s) in the voltage regulator section of the unit.

I suggest you charge the battery and leave it disconnected from the vehicle for a couple of days and recheck it.

When you reference a 'battery tender', what brand of 'tender' are you using and what's the rated amp outputs of the various stages of charge?
I'm measuring voltage drop with the diode setting on my multimeter. At least that is what I assumed I'm measuring when I use the diode setting.

I'm not using a battery tender brand. I'm using a well regarded Schumacher SP1297 shown below. It's an analyzer, charger, and maintainer.

https://www.amazon.com/Schumacher-SP1297-Automatic-Battery-Maintainer/dp/B0756PV96N/ref=mp_s_a_1_4?keywords=schumacher+battery+maintainer&qid=1562426962&s=gateway&sprefix=schumacher+&sr=8-4
 

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The battery maintainer you're using looks to be a good one. Some of these type maintainers put the battery under constant charge which results in an overcharged battery which as we know is not what we want. I would look for less finite measurements. I would test charging (voltage) at the battery terminals but this time @3,000rpm. What do you have then???? If that doesn't exceed 14.5vdc I would start testing the stator.
 

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Also your forward bias #'s look good. BUT #3 with the split second reading the OL may be a sign of the problem. Electronics can be so damn chaotic at times!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the help. I borrowed a multimeter from my BIL to confirm the weird split second reading I was getting. I thought maybe it could be a problem with my own multimeter. The weird spike reading occurred with his meter as well. I removed the battery completely from the ATV and have charge it overnight. It only charged to 12.08V. I believe the Yuasa is trashed. I hate to keep buying batteries until I can figure out what's going on.

I feel like it's not the stator. As mentioned, while running the voltage will hold well over 14v.

I could install a battery disconnect but I feel like that's just a band aid.
 

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What or who's a BIL?
 

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The charger you gave a link to is a 3 amp - the maximum charge rate for the battery you should have (Yuasa YTX14AH-BS 1.26Ah) is 1.2 amps for 5-10 hours

The charger you should use is the SP1295 (1 amp) - the charger is damaging the battery - never charge above 10% of the amp hour rating of the battery for maximum service life.

You might get by with the charger you have if you only turn it on for about 15 minutes at a time.

I charge my batteries with a 750 milliamp to 1.25 amp Battery Tender brand of smart charger - there is nothing wrong with the Schumacher brand - they have an excellent product - you just need to match it with the battery amp hour rating - you can charge at less than 10% of the battery rating, it just takes longer.

I believe your rec/reg is fine. I have several meters. The one I use most frequently has an input voltage of 1.5 volts. When I select ' Diode check', it automatically selects the 200 ohm scale and reads the resistance of the diode. Of course your meter may be different.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The charger you gave a link to is a 3 amp - the maximum charge rate for the battery you should have (Yuasa YTX14AH-BS 1.26Ah) is 1.2 amps for 5-10 hours

The charger you should use is the SP1295 (1 amp) - the charger is damaging the battery - never charge above 10% of the amp hour rating of the battery for maximum service life.

You might get by with the charger you have if you only turn it on for about 15 minutes at a time.

I charge my batteries with a 750 milliamp to 1.25 amp Battery Tender brand of smart charger - there is nothing wrong with the Schumacher brand - they have an excellent product - you just need to match it with the battery amp hour rating - you can charge at less than 10% of the battery rating, it just takes longer.

I believe your rec/reg is fine. I have several meters. The one I use most frequently has an input voltage of 1.5 volts. When I select ' Diode check', it automatically selects the 200 ohm scale and reads the resistance of the diode. Of course your meter may be different.
Never would've thought that the Schumacher charger would damage the battery. Its sold as a motorcycle battery charger maintainer .
 

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The Battery Tender Jr. has been a very good charger/maintainer for me and it has lasted forever so for. In fall of 2000 I bought a new 2001 Honda Rancher and I also bought that Battery Tender Jr then. I kept it hooked up to that Rancher battery 24/7 other than when I was riding the ATV. That original battery that came on the Rancher and I believe it was a Yuasa battery lasted 9 years before it finally pooped out.

I'm still using the Battery Tender Jr to this day, and it's hooked up to my 05 Suzuki Eiger 400 4x4. I bought the Suzuki used in December of 2013 and had to buy a new battery for it with in a week of buying the Suzuki. I believe it was another Yuasa battery that I bought. That Battery Tender Jr. stays connected to it 24/7 other than riding it and that battery now is 5 1/2 years old still going strong. :grin

Tony
 

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Never would've thought that the Schumacher charger would damage the battery. Its sold as a motorcycle battery charger maintainer .
The 3 amp charger might be OK for a Harley, Goldwing or other ATV with a lawn tractor size battery, but I would still plug it into an outlet timer and only turn it on for about an hour at a time even on a large amp hour battery.

The thing I like about the Battery Tender is the Jr. has a 5 year warranty and the Battery Tender Plus has a 10 year warranty. I've had two replaced under warranty and I don't know if it was power surges or normal component failure that caused them to fail, but no questions asked replacement was provided.

I have (1) 6 volt 1.25 amp Tender Jr., (2) 12 volt 750 milliamp Jr., (2) 12 volt Plus 1.25 amp and (1) Jr. Selectable 750 milliamp Lithium/lead acid chargers. I keep one 1.25 amp Plus on my Dodge Dakota RT (which has been drive a total of 25 miles in the last year), the 750ma Jr. is on my CRF with a lithium battery and both are on outlet timers - the one on my Dodge is timed for 3 hours a day and the one on my CFR for 1 hour each day.

The battery in my Dodge is about 11 years old and the lithium battery in my CRF is 3 years old - at this time they both perform like new.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I started from scratch yesterday and pulled the battery from the ATV and put it on a different smart charger with a charge rate of 1.0A. When the battery was finished charging the standing voltage was 12.62V. This morning I checked the battery and it was 12.58V. Went to work and came home this evening and the voltage was 12.56V. I put the battery back in the quad and performed another voltage draw test. Still nothing showing on the multimeter. I started the ATV and watched the voltage. It dropped down in the 10s briefly but quickly rose and stabilized at 14.27v at idle. I increased the rpms up to almost 4000 and it rose to around 14.32v. You can see it in the short video I took. https://youtu.be/-QvEIYt5zOs

I then turned the quad off, pulled the reg/rec out of the 4 wheeler and restarted it. I measured AC voltage across each of the stator legs. It was around 22v at idle and would get up to 52v upon advancing the throttle to 3000+ rpms. This info along with the startup test voltage readings make me think that the stator is okay.

Not sure what my next steps should be. I think I'll actually try taking a long ride and then leave it sit. May need a new battery and if I do I will purchase a battery tender junior to maintain it at a charge amperage that doesn't exceed the recommended charge rating.
 

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Based on your post (13 of 13), I believe the battery is fine, but batteries fail in many ways and while it holds a static charge it's amperage flow could be hindered. Voltage is like water pressure; if you have a garden hose (wire for electricity) and turn on the hydrant, the water pressure in the hose is voltage - open the nozzle and the water that comes out is amperage - put a kink in the hose and close the nozzle and you will still have pressure, but open the nozzle and the kink will obstruct the water that flows through the hose. A battery is a water tower and it has a constant voltage, but if rust has decreased the diameter of the pipe (sulfate or hardening of the material on the anode and cathode of a lead acid battery) the pressure is still the same, but the flow will be decreased. This causes a decrease in pressure at the nozzle (voltage drop across a motor or light bulb) and you do not get the flow needed to do the job. So it could still be a battery issue if the battery was not properly activated when new or if the battery has been completely drained at any time and if the battery has been charged above 1.25 amps for more than 10 hours.

I am curious of the possibility of AC voltage bleeding into the DC circuit. Most typically you would not have much more than battery voltage at idle and when revved to appx. 2500 rpm the voltage across the battery terminals would increase initially one or 2 volts and gradually increase from say 13.5 to 14.8 as the battery charges. At 14.8 volts, the voltage regulator would activate and shunt excess voltage to ground until the battery voltage decreases to appx. 13.2 volts and then allow full voltage to the battery again (regulator cycling on and off).

Put your meter on AC and connect to the battery terminals and see what kind of reading you get.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Just an update. I bought a battery tender junior and left it on the battery for a few days. I also upgraded my multimeter to an auto sensing clamp meter. Everything seems fine right now. I've left the tender off the battery for a few days and the static voltage is holding up. Seems to start easly with plenty of cranking amps. Still no measurable phantom voltages.

Maybe I didn't ruin the battery afterall.
 

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Just an update. I bought a battery tender junior and left it on the battery for a few days. I also upgraded my multimeter to an auto sensing clamp meter. Everything seems fine right now. I've left the tender off the battery for a few days and the static voltage is holding up. Seems to start easly with plenty of cranking amps. Still no measurable phantom voltages.

Maybe I didn't ruin the battery afterall.

Good deal - glad it's working for you
 
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