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1996 Magnum 425. Was riding this weekend and got into a deep mud hole. No muck got pulled into the air cleaner - verified by visual inspection. It was close - the muck came to within an inch of the air intake.

The clutch housing was filled with muck, which has been cleaned out in the field by dumping a gallon of water over it once the plastic shroud was removed.

I am able to start it and it idles decently. However, if the engine is revved, it bogs down and dies. I cannot even get the RPMs up high enough to engage the clutch. Behind the clutch air intake/breather tube (that comes up by the gas tank) there is another intake that is about 1.5 inches in diameter. (Not the carb air intake). That was also submerged below the water line and I have not cleaned that out.

First question - what is the mystery air intake? It appears to lead down to the lower part of the engine area. Other than getting a hose out and really cleaning the clutch and belt, what else do I need to focus on to get this machine running again?

Thanks in advance for any advice!
 

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Drain the carb to get water out of the float bowl and see if that might be the problem - if the carb was below water and it does not have the vent and drain hoses in place or not routed correctly, then water may have entered the float bowl.
 

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2017 Sportsman 850SP
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I would also confirm that there is no water in your oil that came in through the exhaust. Your exhaust pipe could also be plugged up with muck and water.
 
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I would also confirm that there is no water in your oil that came in through the exhaust. Your exhaust pipe could also be plugged up with muck and water.
Water is not likely to get into the oil through the exhaust - as long as engine rpm is kept sufficiently high to prevent water from plugging the exhaust and high back pressure killing the engine, water will be kept out of the exhaust system - water usually gets into the oil from improper engine venting or a swamped air box.
 

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2017 Sportsman 850SP
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Water is not likely to get into the oil through the exhaust - as long as engine rpm is kept sufficiently high to prevent water from plugging the exhaust and high back pressure killing the engine, water will be kept out of the exhaust system - water usually gets into the oil from improper engine venting or a swamped air box.
I was more thinking if the exhaust was submerged and the engine died. Then just because there is no water in the air box doesn’t necessarily mean that water didn’t get into the engine.
 

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I was more thinking if the exhaust was submerged and the engine died. Then just because there is no water in the air box doesn’t necessarily mean that water didn’t get into the engine.
Correct - if the exhaust is obstructed by being submerged and the engine dies, water can fill the exhaust - if the exhaust valve is open, water may enter the cylinder, however if the engine is cranked over, most of the water in the cylinder is pushed back out the exhaust, but if too much water stays in the cylinder on the next stroke the compression is raised by the liquid and the engine may struggle to go over TDC, however if the engine fires for just a few strokes the liquid will be expelled - if the piston cannot make it over TDC due to excessive compression, remove the spark plug, crank the engine over to expel as much water as possible and try restarting the engine. In any case, water molecules are too large to get past the piston rings - over a long period of time (several months) the water may seep through the ring end gaps and get into the crankcase, but the quantity will be minimal (about a teaspoon) and the oils emulsifiers (detergent) will absorb and trap the water. As the engine is run at operating temperature, the water will be evaporated out of the oil and drawn through the crankcase vent to the air box and the portion that condenses in the air box will be ejected via the air box drain and that which does not condense will be drawn into the combustion chamber and expelled via the exhaust. But getting water into the oil via the exhaust is akin to watching water boil, it takes longer than you anticipate.
 

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19’ 850SP Camo. MtAiry Maryland
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I think if I sunk one, I'd take EVERYTHING apart to clean, flush, clear ALL the junk out before even trying to run it at all... But that's just me.
^^ that has my vote as well, and I’ve had to do it before when one of my dirt bikes was stolen and dumped in a creek.
 

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Water can get into the fuel tank through it’s breather vent tube if it was under water, drain the float bowl as stated earlier, maybe drain the fuel and get some new stuff in there.
 
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