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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm quickly realizing that there is a torque spec for every bolt on my Sportsman. Most everything seems to be low torque aside from the wheel nuts. Since I plan on doing mist of the servicing I want to get a couple of decent torque wrenches without going broke.

I found this on Amazon TEKTON 24320 1/4-Inch Drive Click Torque Wrench, 20-200-Inch/Pound:Amazon:Home Improvement Do I really need to spend $100+ for a wrench? What do you guys recommend?

Any other tools I need? I figure I need some hex sockets, sizes? What about torx sockets?


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I use the $12 ones from horrible freight and haven't had an issue yet. They look very similar to the one you are looking at.


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You could get a beam style like this - 3/8-in Dr Beam Style Torque Wrench: Classic Craftsman Tools at Sears

They are the kind I use now. I used to have an expensive click type that broke. The parts were no longer available to repair it and that pissed me off enough that I switched to the old style. No they are not near as accurate, but for an ATV I believe its close enough. I have done full motor builds using them with success. (Note: you have to know how the handle works on the beam style to be using it correctly)
 

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Torque Wrenches.... I use a couple of "Husky" brand ones ("Click" type 3/8" & 1/2" Drives) from Home Depot. I believe the 1/2" drive is ft/lbs and the 3/8" is in/lbs.

Other Tools..... Not sure what you've already got, but your basic "Mechanics Set" is a great place to start.

I personally have mainly Craftsman hand tools along with some other "decent" brands, including.... 3/8" & 1/2" drive SAE / Metric sockets, 3/8" & 1/2" Rachets, SAE / Metric combination end wrenches, SAE / Metric combination ratcheting end wrenches, long/short / philips/ std screw drivers, pry bars, SAE / Metric nut drivers, SAE / Metric Hex ey (allen) wrenches, tin snips and the list goes on and on.......

A couple things I recently purchased and wondered how I lived without are..... hex & torx bit sockets.

I'd saw a must have are the "ratcheting combination wrenches"..... they are awsome!!!

ANYTIME I THINK OR TALK ABOUT TOOLS, I CAN"T HELP BUT THINK OF THIS CLASSIC LINE AS WELL.......

 

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go to lowes and look at the cobalt one...I just bought one..they have 1/2" and 3/8ths also...I think they are good quaility....just remember to do the conversion from foot pounds to inch pounds when needed....my buddies kid was putting new head gasket in his lawn tractor...will it was like 90 inch pounds to torgue heads..he did 90 foot pounds..snapped the bolt in the block...loll

look at sears they have tool kits on sale alot....like 70 piece sets....need sockets...rachet wrenches..allen wrenches...torx...screwdriver set...vise grips...pliers...a meter....
 

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I also use the harbor freight torque wrenches. They work great and both my 1/2 and 3/8 drive are in ft lbs. Also I love my Allen head sockets. The tekton stuff I think is the same as the harbor freight stuff just re branded.

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Discussion Starter #8
I have a fairly decent set of craftsman mechanics tools, sockets, ratchets, screwdrivers, nut drivers, and Allen wrenches. Really just need Allen and torx bits maybe some extensions and some deep well sockets. Oh and obviously need the torque wrenches.

I would love to be able to drop money into high quality tools, but I would rather spend it on add ons vs a tool I use every once in a blue moon. One thing I've learned is not to skimp on tools that you constantly use. The last thing you want is a bit rounding off and then damaging an Allen head.

Growing up I always had access to my dad's high quality stuff which I didn't realize how nice it was until I lived 10 hours away! Slowly but surely I'm getting what I need one at a time.


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Oh and ALWAYS use a torque wrench. I got lazy one time and stripped out the aluminum threads on my oil plug. If I'm tightening something I get the torque spec. Lol

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I use the torgue wrench alot...when I take wheels off monthly to grease I retorgue them on....if you ever need to replace axels ..you need to torgue the axel nuts....or they wear fast...the 3/8ths at lowes is 100 ft pounds..its 39.00...should be good for almost every thing....not much takes over 100 lbs if any
 

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I have 3 different craftsmen torque wrenches. They are the "click" style or manual dialed type. They are calculated using SAE and metric denominations. When I was coming up in the automotive repair business I would spend every paycheck on tools and bought the three torque wrenches. In reality I only use them for precise work on motors or differentials and the like. Other wise 90% of my work is done by feel. I have seen that torque wrench get many people in trouble. With the wrong calculated specs, improperly prepped surfaces, wet/dry torque values and the list goes on. Just something to think about.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Oh and ALWAYS use a torque wrench. I got lazy one time and stripped out the aluminum threads on my oil plug. If I'm tightening something I get the torque spec. Lol

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That's exactly why I was asking what people were using. This thing cost more than a lot of people's cars so I feel like I need to treat it like a lady, lol.


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I have 3 different craftsmen torque wrenches. They are the "click" style or manual dialed type. They are calculated using SAE and metric denominations. When I was coming up in the automotive repair business I would spend every paycheck on tools and bought the three torque wrenches. In reality I only use them for precise work on motors or differentials and the like. Other wise 90% of my work is done by feel. I have seen that torque wrench get many people in trouble. With the wrong calculated specs, improperly prepped surfaces, wet/dry torque values and the list goes on. Just something to think about.
Can you explain how the torque values change with wet/dry? I'd love to know so I don't mess anything up! Lol

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Discussion Starter #14
I have 3 different craftsmen torque wrenches. They are the "click" style or manual dialed type. They are calculated using SAE and metric denominations. When I was coming up in the automotive repair business I would spend every paycheck on tools and bought the three torque wrenches. In reality I only use them for precise work on motors or differentials and the like. Other wise 90% of my work is done by feel. I have seen that torque wrench get many people in trouble. With the wrong calculated specs, improperly prepped surfaces, wet/dry torque values and the list goes on. Just something to think about.

You got me thinking. I was reading about wet and dry torque never realized there was a difference.

What all is considered wet torque?
If I have oil on the drain plug, anti-seize, loctite?

How much should you reduce the torque? I heard 40-45%

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https://www.google.com/search?q=derating+torque+for+anti+seize
There's lots of information out there...
There aren't hard and fast rules about derating for thread lubes. The only real rule is you should not torque wet threads to dry values because you'll overstress the fasteners. Read up on it.

I derate my wheel lugs 35-40%, to keep from snapping them off, with Anti-Sieze applied to the threads. I may be too conservative but I don't have my wheels driving by me on the highway and the lugs stay on...

Cheap beam torque wrenches are fine for the occasional user. I'd steer clear of the super cheap micrometer torque wrenches, sockets, etc.
I have a couple Craftsman micrometer torque wrenches. Husky and Kobalt actually make some pretty reasonable medium cost tools too. Shop around. You get what pay for. Shelling out a little more to have quality tools you can pass along isn't a bad idea.

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Al53's the man he beat me to it. So in wet applications the torque values get reduced. It may be out side of the scope of the thread question but another overlooked scenario is bolt stretch. In high pressure applications the faster will elongate due to tightening torque and the applications internal stresses. So in scenarios like this the fasteners cannot be re-used if they are failure is almost certain due to the wrong calculated torque.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Well this post kind of evolved, but my question is are the values they give on the oil drain plug and other fluid plugs wet or dry? Do they assume you have oil on your oil plug?


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Dry unless otherwise stated.
 
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