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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
I'm a newbie to the forum so please forgive my general lack of knowledge about the polaris machines. I've searched here and online in general and can't find anything on my year of machine...a few posts for newer ones but the info I have seen there doesn't seem to jive with what i've got. I have an 88 trail boss 4x4 250. trying to pull the motor and the next step is to get the variable transmission drive pulley off the crankshaft. manual says I need a special polaris puller but I can't seem to find one anywhere that costs less than my first born. My guess is though that if I get a bolt of the right size I can thread it in and it will push against the end of the crankshaft and effectively push the pulley off. From what I can gather thats what the special tool does. anyway...has anyone made a puller for this year machine? If so...which threadpitch and size did you use? Using a pitch gauge I'm thinking its a 9/16 x 18 but can't seem to find a bolt to try. Looking for some sort of assurance that i'm on the right track before I go nuts trying to find either the tool or the bolt. also since I can't actually see the end of the crankshaft..am I going to wreck anything doing it this way. Any information that anyone has on this older machine is much appreciated. Thanks!

- Dahlbug
 

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Welcome to the board!:biglaugh:
 

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5/8 allthread rod, mine is about 8 inches in length, and two nuts One nut is a jam nut against the other. Screw in pulley comes off.

TBS
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I tried a 9/16 x 18 last night and that is too big so 5/8 isn't it either...on mine anyway. could it be that there is something incorrect on my machine?



as for the pullers...I have purchased two already and niether are/were correct even though both places said it was the correct tool for my machine. both were too big. (3/4")

5/8 allthread rod, mine is about 8 inches in length, and two nuts One nut is a jam nut against the other. Screw in pulley comes off.

TBS
 

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That old of a machine may be different. Worked on my 02 Trailblazer
 

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Don't be confused by the retaining bolts threads. The puller uses threads in the drive clutch assembly, NOT the smaller threads of the retaining bolt. (I did the same thing when I went to remove the drive clutch on my wife's Trail Boss.)

IIRC, SC1 should be the puller your needing. Red-sportsman is correct, about 30$ on EBay. I bought a fancy two piece one for working on the cramped XP engines and it was only a bit more.

CW
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Can you explain more? I don't understand. The retaining bolt on mine threads into the end of the crankshaft. When I remove that, there are larger diameter threads on the actuall pulley. In the service manual I have it says to thread the puller in there. So are you saying there are other even larger threads further back? If so how am I supposed to access that when the most exterior threads are of a smaller diameter so I would not be able to get a larger puller through. Thanks.

- Dahlbug

Don't be confused by the retaining bolts threads. The puller uses threads in the drive clutch assembly, NOT the smaller threads of the retaining bolt. (I did the same thing when I went to remove the drive clutch on my wife's Trail Boss.)

IIRC, SC1 should be the puller your needing. Red-sportsman is correct, about 30$ on EBay. I bought a fancy two piece one for working on the cramped XP engines and it was only a bit more.

CW
 

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Can you explain more? I don't understand. The retaining bolt on mine threads into the end of the crankshaft. When I remove that, there are larger diameter threads on the actuall pulley. In the service manual I have it says to thread the puller in there. So are you saying there are other even larger threads further back? If so how am I supposed to access that when the most exterior threads are of a smaller diameter so I would not be able to get a larger puller through. Thanks.

- Dahlbug
You are correct in how to do it. You thread into the Primary clutch as you
say. It's just finding out the correct diam shaft & thread for your `88.

When I needed to take the Primary off a `98 Scrambler, I found a cheat
that uses a 2-1/2" long x 3/4 fine thread bolt and a 6" piece of 5/8" round
stock. My problem was the local hardware store didn't have the bolt in
fine thread just coarse. Ended spotting a trailer ball that had 3/4 fine thread and just cut a longer piece of the 5/8" stock.

Maybe it's that you need to find the correct thread size possibly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Update:

okay so I used a full standard tap set and nothing matches up. I'm thinking it has to be metric but I don't have a metric tap set that goes big enough. Mine goes to 13mm and I think its 14mm which jives with 9/16 being just a hair to big. I finally found a place online that may have a tool that works. they guy on the phone said that it sounds like it may actually be the drive pulley from a snowmobile. Sort of makes sense give the manufacturer and vintage of the machine. Any thoughts on that? Anyway the tool that he thinks might work is Here:
Polaris Clutch Puller

it appears to be 14mm but the shape looks different that all the other atv pullers I've seen. Anyway.. What do folks think about this? I just don't want to pay for it and order it from New York if its not the right thing although at this point I have to admit I'm getting a bit desperate. Thanks!
 

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Can you explain more? I don't understand. The retaining bolt on mine threads into the end of the crankshaft. When I remove that, there are larger diameter threads on the actual pulley. In the service manual I have it says to thread the puller in there. So are you saying there are other even larger threads further back? If so how am I supposed to access that when the most exterior threads are of a smaller diameter so I would not be able to get a larger puller through. Thanks.

- Dahlbug

Don't be confused by the retaining bolts threads. The puller uses threads in the drive clutch assembly, NOT the smaller threads of the retaining bolt. (I did the same thing when I went to remove the drive clutch on my wife's Trail Boss.)

IIRC, SC1 should be the puller your needing. Red-sportsman is correct, about 30$ on EBay. I bought a fancy two piece one for working on the cramped XP engines and it was only a bit more.

CW
YES,
The end of the crank is slightly tapered on the outside and drilled and tapped on the inside. the driven clutch slides on and stops. its held on by a bolt with a thick heavy washer that threads into the end of the crank. As you torque the bolt, it "snugs" up the driven clutch on the taper.

SO, to remove it, the tool engages some threads in the clutch and presses against the end of the crank. Its too large for the hole in the crank and with the fin threads offers a ton of torque to push the driven clutch off the tapered crank.

The only question I have is if your driven clutch has the same thread as the PS1 tool...

CW
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Cwlongshot - Thank you. I think we just didn't understand each other. I knew/know that there are threads in the end of the shaft that is different from the threads that are in the actual pulley. My problem is that the threads in the actual pulley are much smaller than everyone has told me thus far. (almost everyone says that its 3/4) That said... I ordered up what I think is the correct tool from a shop in New York today. its a 14mm and is from the drive pulley on older polaris snowmobiles. (I posted a link to it above) Its seems to reason that they may have used that same pulley on these older machines and the guy at the shop said as much...or someone switched it out on their own at some point. Anyway...I've ordered the tool and it will be here on Thursday. I'll make sure and let everyone know how it turns out. Anyway...thanks for the help thus far folks.
 

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I ordered up what I think is the correct tool from a shop in New York today. its a 14mm and is from the drive pulley on older polaris snowmobiles. (I posted a link to it above) Its seems to reason that they may have used that same pulley on these older machines and the guy at the shop said as much...or someone switched it out on their own at some point. Anyway...I've ordered the tool and it will be here on Thursday. I'll make sure and let everyone know how it turns out. Anyway...thanks for the help thus far folks.
Shit, sorry I didn't get to post this earlier but was having connection problems.

First, I found my note for a self made set-up for pulling the Primary
clutch. It's the use of a 3/4" x 2-1/2" x 16 thread bolt and a 5/8 x 3-1/2"
piece of round stock.

The pic shows my make shift of the "make shift tool" using a ball hitch
that had a 3/4" shaft with 16 thread. I just made the stock longer.

Dahlbug, if you could've found a 14mm fine thread bolt and round stock,
you could have done the same thing. Just put the round stock in the hole
and turn the bolt in. I put a crowbar down through the clutch and caught
the footwell brace to hold the clutch still on the `98 scrambler.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
So the tool came in and it is exactly correct. Now I have a new problem...it won't separate from the crank shaft. Had an absolutely crazy amount of torque on it and it never popped. Tried the hammer as suggested here and elsewhere and nothing. Even tried using my impact. Going to try applying heat and maybe freeze away tonight. If that doesn't work I have no idea what to try next. Also have now noticed that the plastic rear cover behind the clutch (both pulleys) is pretty worked. Haven't seen one on eBay... Anyone have a suggestion as to where to get one affordably?
 

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There are a couple of other ways to remove a stubborn clutch. You can try filling the hole with grease and installing the removal tool and tighten. Then apply heat to the center of the clutch where the belt rides. The grease will expand when heated and push the clutch off, be very careful and wear gloves, coveralls and eye protection, the hot grease can splatter quite a bit. Another method that is very effective is tipping the quad on its side a filling the hole with water, then put a bolt with teflon tape on the treads to seal the hole, take the quad outside and let it freeze, water expands when it freezes and will also push the clutch off. This will obviously only works in the winter months.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
There are few times in my life that I felt as triumphant as the moment that stupid pulley popped loose. Good grief what a night! I'm not entirely sure what was the last straw but some sort of crazy combo between the freeze-off, the torch, the 5lb hammer, and the insanely large breaker bar and I'm home free. Thank you for all of the suggestions. So..in short...those who might read this down the road:

My machine: 1988 Trail boss 250 4x4
- clutch drive pulley is actually from the 80's polaris snowmobiles and so does not take the standard 3/4 inch atv puller but rather uses a 14mm snowmobile puller polaris number 2871855. Do not try to make your own tool. this tool as a two step taper. i'm 100% positive that there is no way we could have applied as much torque as we did with a standard bolt. I did include a link to the site I bought it from in an earlier post.

- semi special tools needed - 5lb hammer, torch for heat, large breaker bar. I would also recomend using an impact socket because as i've said before the torque we applied was down right insane.

Process:
removed all the covers and stuff according to the manual and the retaining bolt. Split the halves of the pulley and remove the outer one as then there is a flat end on the shaft you can use to brace against the frame/footbed to keep from rotating. Use the torch and heat up the shaft all around the base of the pulley...a lot. Then we (probably not smart as this stuff is crazy flamable) shot a buch of the freeze-off down the middle (where you normally insert the puller) for 45 seconds which dramtically cooled things very quickly, then inserted the puller and went nuts with the torque rapping on it repeadedly with the 5lb hammer. Eventually the sound of the hammer turned from a "ping" to a more hollow sound and with a few more turns of the puller it popped off. Then..drink a PBR. (or your barely pop of choice) Your process may vary of course as hopefully yours isn't nearly as stuck as mine was but this is how we did it. :cowboy:
 
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