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Just experienced this myself on the weekend. I hit the water hole slow and it was way deeper then i expected but still should have been manageable. Bike was doing great but then started to loose power and ended up quiting on me right in the middle of the hole. My exhaust was under water and i did not dare try to start it again. Thankfully my wife had her bike and used my winch to pull me out. After i got out i let it drain out a bit then attempt a start and it started right up no problem.
1) I heard about these bikes pulling vapor (steam) from the engine compartment and bogging them out (only remedy here is a snorkel I guess)
2) A possible leak in my air box. I have not opened the air box to check it yet but will be doing so tonight or tomorrow. If its dirty water stained its safe to safe its leaking.
 

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Just experienced this myself on the weekend. I hit the water hole slow and it was way deeper then i expected but still should have been manageable. Bike was doing great but then started to loose power and ended up quiting on me right in the middle of the hole. My exhaust was under water and i did not dare try to start it again. Thankfully my wife had her bike and used my winch to pull me out. After i got out i let it drain out a bit then attempt a start and it started right up no problem.
1) I heard about these bikes pulling vapor (steam) from the engine compartment and bogging them out (only remedy here is a snorkel I guess)
2) A possible leak in my air box. I have not opened the air box to check it yet but will be doing so tonight or tomorrow. If its dirty water stained its safe to safe its leaking.
What machine??
 

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2017 Sportsman 850SP
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You are lucky you didn’t blow the motor. If your machine stalls in water you should never try restarting until you have checked the air box for water, oil for water and pulled the plugs and cranked over the engine a couple times to clear the cylinders.

If your exhaust was under, chances are you had water over your air box which is under the seat and water could have gotten in. But it could have also stalled due to the exhaust being under and not enough throttle. These aren’t Honda’s which will idle under water all day long.
 
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You are lucky you didn’t blow the motor. If your machine stalls in water you should never try restarting until you have checked the air box for water, oil for water and pulled the plugs and cranked over the engine a couple times to clear the cylinders.

If your exhaust was under, chances are you had water over your air box which is under the seat and water could have gotten in. But it could have also stalled due to the exhaust being under and not enough throttle. These aren’t Honda’s which will idle under water all day long.
It was full throttle when it died cause I was losing power and trying to get thru. Also we were extremely far away from home I was taking the chance it wouldn't get damaged. Its not the first time it shut off due to vapor I know that for sure. Water in the intake though at a slow water crawl is new.
 

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I don't understand, how could you be going through the water hole slow at full throttle. You either were going slow at no where near high RPM's which could have choked your exhaust or you hit it hard and water got everywhere.
 
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19’ 850SP Camo. MtAiry Maryland
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I don't understand, how could you be going through the water hole slow at full throttle. You either were going slow at no where near high RPM's which could have choked your exhaust or you hit it hard and water got everywhere.
^^yep, you got some splainn to do Lucy!
 

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I don't understand, how could you be going through the water hole slow at full throttle. You either were going slow at no where near high RPM's which could have choked your exhaust or you hit it hard and water got everywhere.
Again it was bogging out (aka engine was dying down , no vroom vroom no wheels make spinnie motion)
 

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Again it was bogging out (aka engine was dying down , no vroom vroom no wheels make spinnie motion)
So then you weren't full throttle... as you suggested. Maybe you had the throttle pinned, but the RPM's weren't up there to keep the exhaust free and clear which likely choked your engine. As you said "no vroom vroom no wheels make spinnie motion" means no RPM's.
 

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So then you weren't full throttle... as you suggested. Maybe you had the throttle pinned, but the RPM's weren't up there to keep the exhaust free and clear which likely choked your engine. As you said "no vroom vroom no wheels make spinnie motion" means no RPM's.
Ugh....I know how it works why are you fighting me with this? Went in hole slow, low range , 4wd on. Starting getting deeper so gave it all the beans to get thru, was going good but started to bog down. Lots of steam was present but so was lots of deep water. It obviously sucked something in to choke the engine. If your trying to defend the Polaris name you can quit.
 

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2008 800 ho efi, 2019 850 SP premium
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I measured the above statement with the Fluke Model 570 meter and display says water in the spark plug boots, no dielectric grease detected.
 
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Ugh....I know how it works why are you fighting me with this? Went in hole slow, low range , 4wd on. Starting getting deeper so gave it all the beans to get thru, was going good but started to bog down. Lots of steam was present but so was lots of deep water. It obviously sucked something in to choke the engine. If your trying to defend the Polaris name you can quit.
Not defending the Polaris name at all and not fighting you on anything. Just trying to help you figure out what happened so that you can avoid it in the future. Was the water deep enough to get into your air box and somehow you fluked out when starting it without hydro locking and blowing your engine, or did it simply die because the exhaust was plugged with water and there wasn't enough back flow? Steam has nothing to do with nothing, that's just your engine cooling off because of the cold water, never heard of your engine intake sucking in enough steam to shut down, but if that was the case, again, you got lucky that you didn't hydro lock and blow your engine.

On that note, I'm done with this conversation. Good luck with your machine and with future water crossings.

Cheers
 
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What he described is water vapor in place of air - when the engine and exhaust get wet at low speed the water vaporizes and if there is sufficient water vapor in the air being sucked into the intake, it displaces air and the effectively runs over rich with fuel and opening the throttle fully just does not help in this situation - once the vapor disperses into the air, it will start and run normally again.

It's one of the reasons car engines were equipped with an exhaust manifold shroud and a duct to the air cleaner. Warm air is dry and thin. Cold moist air is dense. Old cars with carburetors (my 63 Ford Galaxie and 65 Mustang were among them) without a heat riser installed could experience icing in the carb venturi when driving in a fog. As the velocity of air is increased through a small opening, the temperature of the air is lowered. At a high velocity, the temp of the air may drop below freezing and moisture in the air will freeze to the throttle butterfly. As the ice builds up, it restricts the venturi size increasing the velocity of the air that passes through lowering the temp even more and increasing the ice build up - the engine can't draw air and the fuel consumption increases to appx 3 fold over normal and the engine loses power, will not accelerate and eventually dies. When the heat from the engine melts the ice, the carburetor works normally and the engine starts and runs fine - until it happens again. The exhaust shroud allowed air heated by the exhaust to be drawn into the intake to help combat carburetor icing.

When steam is produced in warm air, the water vapor still displaces air and a similar loss of performance is experienced.
 
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