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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys. I just picked up a 2004 Sportsman 600. It needed some work and still needs more, but it runs great.
I put four new cv/axles in, but when I went to press in the new front wheel bearings I found they were the wrong ones. All the listings show the sealed bearings that I bought (All balls 25-1424), but my atv bearings are sealed on one side and open on the other. The hub acts as the race.
Any help in identifying what's up, I'd appreciate.

2004 Polaris Sportsman 600 4x4.
 

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What you have is the old bearing race is stuck to the hub, seen it before.
its not easy to get the old race off the hub. What I do is take the old bearing out of the strut , push the race that still in the bearing out of the old bearing.
Slip that race on the hub, tack weld the two races in about 4 spots, then use a puller to remove the welded races off the wheel hub.
 

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Hey guys. I just picked up a 2004 Sportsman 600. It needed some work and still needs more, but it runs great.
I put four new cv/axles in, but when I went to press in the new front wheel bearings I found they were the wrong ones. All the listings show the sealed bearings that I bought (All balls 25-1424), but my atv bearings are sealed on one side and open on the other. The hub acts as the race.
Any help in identifying what's up, I'd appreciate.

2004 Polaris Sportsman 600 4x4.
LOL... NO!! The inner race from the old bearing is still stuck on your hub. Knock it off and then your new bearings will fit. I have seen some old ones that the stuck inner race had to be cut with a Dremel cutoff wheel and split to get them off. Most times it will just knock loose.
 

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If you'd like you can pop one of the inner races out of a new bearing to see the part you need to remove from your hub. The hub is aluminum. The race is hardened steel.

LOL, you're not the first one that's made that mistake. :grin
 

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I will add this, I just installed All balls bearings in my 600, one of the bearings fit the wheel hub just right, the other one did not.
The corner radius on the inner race was to small to fit the wheel hub. it slid on just fine, but the corner radius being to small made it lock to the wheel hub.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
All fixed. The broken race slid right off the hub. I was able to change out the bearing without anymore drama... Swapped out the speed sensor at the same time. Nice to have the speedo working.
Thanks again for the help.
 

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Yep, the race isn't really "broken". Those double row ball bearings have a split, two-piece inner race. Sometimes one of them will stick on the hub or axle and you can't really tell unless you know what to look for. It just looks like part of the hub. You aren't the first one to make that mistake.
I had a RZR come in the shop last year with a front wheel locked up. The owner said a friend of his just put new wheel bearings in a couple months before and he couldn't figure out why it had failed so soon. When I took the wheel off it was obvious to me that his friend had tried to force the thing back together with one of the old races still stuck on the hub. He'd spacered the brake caliper up so it would align with the disc and it had all come apart locking the wheel... VERY DANGEROUS!! The guy was lucky it didn't happen at high speed or it could have been a disaster.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yep, the race isn't really "broken". Those double row ball bearings have a split, two-piece inner race. Sometimes one of them will stick on the hub or axle and you can't really tell unless you know what to look for. It just looks like part of the hub. You aren't the first one to make that mistake.
I had a RZR come in the shop last year with a front wheel locked up. The owner said a friend of his just put new wheel bearings in a couple months before and he couldn't figure out why it had failed so soon. When I took the wheel off it was obvious to me that his friend had tried to force the thing back together with one of the old races still stuck on the hub. He'd spacered the brake caliper up so it would align with the disc and it had all come apart locking the wheel... VERY DANGEROUS!! The guy was lucky it didn't happen at high speed or it could have been a disaster.
Holy crap! That's scary and sad... When I tried to put it back together without noticing the race was stuck, it was obvious that something was wrong. In today's day and age of the information highway and knowledgeable guys like you willing to help, there's not much of an excuse for that one.
As far as my situation went, you nailed it. You can't really tell unless you've seen it before or know what to look for. The grease makes it just look like part of the hub. Even without grease you'd be hard pressed to tell. I've done a ton of bearings in everything from my 69 Camaro to my F350 and several Harleys. Even Minis and a Benz. I've never run across the split race before though. I have seen bearings weld themselves to an axle on a trailer once or twice though when not greased.
 

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Yep, the race isn't really "broken". Those double row ball bearings have a split, two-piece inner race. Sometimes one of them will stick on the hub or axle and you can't really tell unless you know what to look for. It just looks like part of the hub. You aren't the first one to make that mistake.
I had a RZR come in the shop last year with a front wheel locked up. The owner said a friend of his just put new wheel bearings in a couple months before and he couldn't figure out why it had failed so soon. When I took the wheel off it was obvious to me that his friend had tried to force the thing back together with one of the old races still stuck on the hub. He'd spacered the brake caliper up so it would align with the disc and it had all come apart locking the wheel... VERY DANGEROUS!! The guy was lucky it didn't happen at high speed or it could have been a disaster.
Holy crap! That's scary and sad... When I tried to put it back together without noticing the race was stuck, it was obvious that something was wrong. In today's day and age of the information highway and knowledgeable guys like you willing to help, there's not much of an excuse for that one.
As far as my situation went, you nailed it. You can't really tell unless you've seen it before or know what to look for. The grease makes it just look like part of the hub. Even without grease you'd be hard pressed to tell. I've done a ton of bearings in everything from my 69 Camaro to my F350 and several Harleys. Even Minis and a Benz. I've never run across the split race before though. I have seen bearings weld themselves to an axle on a trailer once or twice though when not greased.
Most all atv's use a double row ball bearing with a split inner race nowadays Hawk. You can get bearing greasers that slip over the axle and into the bearing so it doesn't have to be removed from the machine. They seal around the outside and pump grease through the split between the inner races to force out water and dirt and make your wheel bearings last way longer. I pump them full when new and then give them a few pumps anytime I have the wheels off doing something else. That's one of the first things I did to my new 1000 Sportsman when I got it home. New wheel bearings only have barely enough grease in them to prevent rust while in storage. Before I started greasing them, my machines would need new wheel bearings about every year. Now I do put a LOT of miles on in some really rough and often wet terrain, but according to where you ride, if you grease them a couple times per season you'll hardly ever need to replace them anymore. If you ride a lot and especially if its wet, the bearing greasers will pay for themselves within the first year.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yep, the race isn't really "broken". Those double row ball bearings have a split, two-piece inner race. Sometimes one of them will stick on the hub or axle and you can't really tell unless you know what to look for. It just looks like part of the hub. You aren't the first one to make that mistake.
I had a RZR come in the shop last year with a front wheel locked up. The owner said a friend of his just put new wheel bearings in a couple months before and he couldn't figure out why it had failed so soon. When I took the wheel off it was obvious to me that his friend had tried to force the thing back together with one of the old races still stuck on the hub. He'd spacered the brake caliper up so it would align with the disc and it had all come apart locking the wheel... VERY DANGEROUS!! The guy was lucky it didn't happen at high speed or it could have been a disaster.
Holy crap! That's scary and sad... When I tried to put it back together without noticing the race was stuck, it was obvious that something was wrong. In today's day and age of the information highway and knowledgeable guys like you willing to help, there's not much of an excuse for that one.
As far as my situation went, you nailed it. You can't really tell unless you've seen it before or know what to look for. The grease makes it just look like part of the hub. Even without grease you'd be hard pressed to tell. I've done a ton of bearings in everything from my 69 Camaro to my F350 and several Harleys. Even Minis and a Benz. I've never run across the split race before though. I have seen bearings weld themselves to an axle on a trailer once or twice though when not greased.
Most all atv's use a double row ball bearing with a split inner race nowadays Hawk. You can get bearing greasers that slip over the axle and into the bearing so it doesn't have to be removed from the machine. They seal around the outside and pump grease through the split between the inner races to force out water and dirt and make your wheel bearings last way longer. I pump them full when new and then give them a few pumps anytime I have the wheels off doing something else. That's one of the first things I did to my new 1000 Sportsman when I got it home. New wheel bearings only have barely enough grease in them to prevent rust while in storage. Before I started greasing them, my machines would need new wheel bearings about every year. Now I do put a LOT of miles on in some really rough and often wet terrain, but according to where you ride, if you grease them a couple times per season you'll hardly ever need to replace them anymore. If you ride a lot and especially if its wet, the bearing greasers will pay for themselves within the first year.
Great advice to deal with maybe a not so great design. They're 35mm and 44mm front and back right? What do you think about a cheap kit like this: https://www.ebay.com/i/223455430363?chn=ps
I know the prices on them are all over the place, but it doesn't look like there's much to them. Would something like this be good for a backyard guy?
 

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Yeah, the cheap ones work just fine. The more expensive ones have more grease ports. The cheaper ones only have one. You just need to put it in... give a few pumps... turn it about 1/8 turn... few more pumps... turn again... etc. etc....
The more pricey ones have multiple ports so you don't need to turn it to thoroughly grease the whole bearing. They grease all parts of the bearing at once. I have both types for different machines and its just a matter of knowing how to use the particular tool you have. They both will do the job if used correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yeah, the cheap ones work just fine. The more expensive ones have more grease ports. The cheaper ones only have one. You just need to put it in... give a few pumps... turn it about 1/8 turn... few more pumps... turn again... etc. etc....
The more pricey ones have multiple ports so you don't need to turn it to thoroughly grease the whole bearing. They grease all parts of the bearing at once. I have both types for different machines and its just a matter of knowing how to use the particular tool you have. They both will do the job if used correctly.
I bet I can machine a few more ports into it. Might not be worth the trouble though. Thanks again for the info.
 
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